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Nine Pints: A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood

Nine Pints: A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood

Écrit par Rose George

Raconté par Karen Cass


Nine Pints: A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood

Écrit par Rose George

Raconté par Karen Cass

évaluations:
4.5/5 (42 évaluations)
Longueur:
12 heures
Sortie:
Dec 4, 2018
ISBN:
9781721335961
Format:
Livre audio

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Note de l'éditeur

Bloody Valentine…

Deepen your appreciation for blood, our vital bodily fluid, by listening to Rose George’s fascinating microhistory exploring everything from ancient bloodletting to menstruation taboos to innovations in medical technology.

Description

An eye-opening exploration of blood, the lifegiving substance with the power of taboo, the value of diamonds and the promise of breakthrough science

Blood carries life, yet the sight of it makes people faint. It is a waste product and a commodity pricier than oil. It can save lives and transmit deadly infections. Each one of us has roughly nine pints of it, yet many don't even know their own blood type. And for all its ubiquitousness, the few tablespoons of blood discharged by 800 million women are still regarded as taboo: menstruation is perhaps the single most demonized biological event.

Rose George, author of The Big Necessity, is renowned for her intrepid work on topics that are invisible but vitally important. In Nine Pints, she takes us from ancient practices of bloodletting to modern "hemovigilance" teams that track blood-borne diseases. She introduces Janet Vaughan, who set up the world's first system of mass blood donation during the Blitz, and Arunachalam Muruganantham, known as "Menstrual Man" for his work on sanitary pads for developing countries. She probes the lucrative business of plasma transfusions, in which the US is known as the "OPEC of plasma." And she looks to the future, as researchers seek to bring synthetic blood to a hospital near you.

Spanning science and politics, stories and global epidemics, Nine Pints reveals our life's blood in an entirely new light.

Sortie:
Dec 4, 2018
ISBN:
9781721335961
Format:
Livre audio

Également disponible en tant que...

Également disponible en tant que livreLivre

À propos de l'auteur

Rose George is the author of Nine Pints, The Big Necessity and Ninety Percent of Everything. A freelance journalist, she has written for The New York Times, The Guardian, and many other publications. She lives in Yorkshire.


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4.3
42 évaluations / 15 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    Chapter 1 was a bit rambling and seemed more like an Introduction, but the following chapters were tighter focused and absolutely fascinating. Get a glass of wine, sit in your comfiest chair, and enjoy this fact-packed, easily-readable, leisurely tome. There are memorable images and colorful characters, abundant trivia, and sparkly-eyed humor if you take the time to savor what you are reading. The author writes in a way that made it hard for me to put the book down. Around any corner there could be, at turns, a poignant moment offset by a blunt, even brutal, statement. I learned, I was entertained, I delighted, and was repulsed. I was recommending this to my friends and acquaintances before I reached the end of Ch. 2. This is the best kind of reading experience and, admittedly, I enjoy these types of non-fiction works over fiction any day. Will be checking out other topics from this author, and obtaining the official published version.[My honest review comes as a result of winning a free ARC from LibraryThing Early Reviewers].
  • (4/5)
    Rose George’s Nine Pints: A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood is exactly the type of book I tend to love. It has everything – medicine, history, public health, science, culture, and… leeches! I learned a lot from this book and found it to be an enjoyable read. Now I want to read Rose George’s The Big Necessity.
  • (4/5)
    Nine pints refers to the amount of blood an average human has in their body. This book covers the past, present, and future of blood. Leeches, both past and present use, blood transfusions, blood typing, blood banks, menstruation, Aids, hemophilia, DNA sequencing, and synthetic blood are all covered. Did I mention vampires? I really enjoyed the history and science part of the book. The start of blood banks was very interesting. I felt the chapters on menstruation and the "Menstrual Man" needed tighter editing. They felt like they were very personal to the author and a bit like a rant. I understand the implications but felt too much of the book was spent on this. This was an interesting read and recommended to anyone who enjoys science and medical writings.
  • (4/5)
    Nine Pints is all about blood. The author, Rose George, writes in much detail about every aspect of this marvelous substance which flows through our bodies. She covers in depth the history of its use, how it works in the body, the use of transfusions, menstruation, HIV and other diseases, and the various components such as plasma. Interestingly, she starts out with an in-depth study of leeches and bloodletting. It is a very thorough discussion, somewhat compartmentalized in the discrete chapters. I had previously read the author’s "The Big Necessity" and found it excellent, and this book is just as complete and comprehensive in its coverage of another important public health issue.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. It definitely covered a wide-range of topics about blood and the history, but was interesting throughout. I really liked the chapter about Muruga and how he developed affordable sanitary napkins in India (and his machines are now being shipped throughout the developing world). I had seen a news story about him a few years ago, but it was nice to have a more in-depth look at what he has done. The author, Rose George did a fantastic job of giving real-life observations (including the top trauma center in Europe) and how things have progressed. I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Nine Pints: A Journey Through the Money, Medicine, and Mysteries of Blood is an exciting look into the history and uses of blood. I found the blood very informative and I learned a lot of new facts about blood. The book is not too technical and breaks down things into laymans terms that are easy to understand. I found the writing style to be engaging and enjoyable. If you enjoy Mary Roach's books, this would be a book for you. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys learning about biology, medicine, and history.
  • (5/5)
    cultural-exploration, historical-figures, historical-places-events, historical-research, medical, war-is-hell I have been an RN since forever and have worked in an assortment of acute, rehab, and chronic care settings, so my views are not unbiased nor uninformed. Perhaps if I give one example from each chapter it might be useful to those who speak medicalese and those who don't. 1. The changing understanding of blood though millennia including the relatively recent divisions of typing, and the development of blood storage and accessibility. 2. The medical use of leeches from antiquity to the present well past the time of blades or scarification such as brought about the demise of former President Washington.3. The incredible contributions of Dame Janet Maria Vaughan of the women's college at Oxford in the mid twentieth century. 4. The greatest cause of HIV/AIDS around the world is donating blood in Africa and Southeast Asia. 5. The treatment perils for hemophilia. I value the people mentioned, but am very unhappy that Arthur Ashe went unmentioned even though he came from the country whose pharmaceutical companies denied culpability in the deaths of so many unique people. 6. The practices of derision and blame placed upon women in many countries which also have almost no clean water or sanitary facilities simply because the women are having menstrual bleeding. 7. Beginning with the man who endured verbal abuse from nearly everyone while researching the manufacture and distribution of affordable sanitary napkins and tampons in India and developing nations where women could not afford them and were forced to use some methods from antiquity. 8. Trauma Medicine in civilian hospitals and in war areas and the changes in the use of blood and blood products. 9. The history of vampirism and the search for synthetic products as well as blood as a fountain of youth. There is an extensive bibliography following these chapters. I found it to be well written, educational, and enjoyable. I requested and received a free ebook copy from Metropolitan Books courtesy of NetGalley. Thank you!
  • (4/5)
    The first chapter of Nine Pints jumps about quite a bit: donating blood, Odysseus in Hades, Lance Armstrong’s blood doping, Medusa, blood libel, heart rate and blood types. A visit to a blood processing facility reveals some odd facts such as women’s plasma, because of hormones, is often green rather than yellow like men’s. Then it’s off to a hospital in India where relatives are expected to donate blood to replace blood given to family members. The second chapter settles down with everything you ever wanted to know about a single slimy subject—leeches. George covers their historic use in medicine, how they used to be gathered and visits a modern leech supplier. The next chapter presents a discussion of voluntary versus paid blood donation and the beginning of the Emergency Blood Transfusion Service during World War II. All sorts of things were in short supply so modified milk bottles were used for storage and converted ice cream vans were used to transport the blood to hospitals. George also discusses hemophilia and Factor VIII and the efforts to prevent transmission of hepatitis, HIV and CJD (mad cow disease).Just over half the population has an intimate connection with blood but menstruation taboos are almost universal. Women in Nepal must spend part of each month in a cramped menstrual hut because they are considered untouchable. The huts are worse than animal sheds and dangerous: snake attacks can be fatal and there are the “drunken men who conveniently forget about untouchability when it comes to rape.” It is well known that many girls in underdeveloped countries drop out of school when they reach puberty because they don’t have access to feminine hygiene supplies. I did not know that at this age some of those girls turn to prostitution, not to support a drug habit, but just to be able to afford sanitary napkins. Women in developed countries, of course, can afford to purchase such necessities but they are often taxed, sometimes at the luxury level (20% in the UK). George also mentions that many women’s prisons restrict access to sufficient feminine hygiene products forcing inmates to freebleed. While George covers the money and medicine of the subtitle I would have liked to have learned more about blood itself and how it functions in the body. She does, however, in the last chapter, include vampires, young blood treatment to combat aging, Jehovah’s Witnesses and their objection to transfusions and the possibility of creating synthetic blood. The book has many interesting facts and is written for the layperson. When finished it will include Notes and an Index.
  • (3/5)
    This book touches on history, science, medicine & culture all in the interest of blood. The author writes in a casual, easily understood style and some of the topics are quite interesting. It lacks cohesion as a book as the topics seem rather random. And coming in at just under 300 pages with over 600 footnotes, I wonder if a book such as this is relevant? How much is already available on the intranet?I received Galley Proof from Library Thing Early Reviewers Program
  • (3/5)
    For fans of Mary Roach and Sam Kean. Nine Pints opens our eyes to the many wonders of blood. While interesting, I struggled with this one a bit. While the subject matter was clearly extensively researched, I found myself bored at times.
  • (5/5)
    Chapter 1 - My Pint Chapter 2 - That Most Singular and Valuable ReptileChapter 3 - Janet and PercyChapter 4 - Blood BorneChapter 5 - The Yellow StuffChapter 6 - Rotting PicklesChapter 7 - Nasty ClothsChapter 8 - Code RedChapter 9 - Blood Like Guinness: The FutureThis book talks about the nine pints of human blood we have in each of us, adults at least. Though most of the content is focused around the medical uses of blood, it also takes the cultural perspective on how blood, in certain contexts, can be either sacred or profane. For example, chapters 6 and 7 are centered around cultural views of menstruation. The author focuses mostly on the views of it in India, where due to long-standing religious tradition and poor education, is seen as taboo. Due to this stance, women and girls do not get adequate reproductive education nor easy access to feminine hygiene products. Here, due to context, blood is seen as wrong. The first three chapters are on the history and processes of blood transfusions, voluntary and paid blood donation, the use of donated blood to save lives, and how all of that got started, both from the historical and medical side. Also leeches. That's a fun chapter.Chapters 4 and 5 are about blood-transmitted diseases like HIV and the problems that occur with blood that has not been screened for pathogens that gets used on people anyway.Chapter 8 takes place for the most part in an emergency room. It talks about how vital blood is to our bodies, what it does to our bodies when it's there and when it isn't. Chapter 9 is a bit of a catch-all. Yes, there are vampires in this one. But she also mentions experiments with blood revitalization (injecting blood from a younger person into an older one), the Jehovah's Witnesses rule of not getting transfusions, blood experiments and the possible new blood technologies of the (hopefully near) future.I very briefly summarized the chapters, there's a lot more to each. Overall this was a great read, I highly recommend it. It was very, very informative about blood in a non-technical, layman's style way, as well as rather funny at times, similar to the style of author Mary Roach (Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers). I ended up finding this book a lot more interesting that I thought I would, I learned a lot. Thank you Rose George, great book.
  • (4/5)
    A history of a fascinating substance. An organ that does seem like an organ. Necessary as air. Still with unknown mechanisms and properties. A history of our dealings with it--love, like, fear, disgust--it evokes them all.
  • (5/5)
    Like all of her books, Rose George has illuminated the subject of blood and it commerce with depth of detail along with humor and personality.
  • (4/5)
    The average adult human has 9 pints of blood, and in this book Rose George has 9 different chapters exploring the history, science, and industry of blood. She looks at bleeding and leeches (historical and modern leech raising and use), the development of England's blood bank system during WWII, blood borne diseases (especially HIV/AIDS and Hep C), menstruation practices around the world, the Indian man who who invented a cheap pad-making machine to make women's lives easier and more pleasant, trauma practices, and the potential and possibility of artificial blood.This book is interesting and well-written, it is also dense. At least it was dense for me, with no medical or scientific background. Most of this was new--though this book is not written for doctors or scientists, who may feel they know a lot of it already. Basically, it is FULL of information, most of which was new to me.————Thank you to NetGalley and Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt for providing me with an uncorrected proof in exchange for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this one. The topics covered in each chapter did feel somewhat random - verging more on individual essays than one cohesive book - but I didn’t feel this took away from the overall narrative. Recommended if you are looking for a more casual nonfiction read.