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Extra Yarn

Extra Yarn

Écrit par Mac Barnett et Jon Klassen

Raconté par Nicola Barber


Extra Yarn

Écrit par Mac Barnett et Jon Klassen

Raconté par Nicola Barber

évaluations:
4.5/5 (52 évaluations)
Longueur:
7 minutes
Sortie:
Oct 1, 2014
ISBN:
9780545798747
Format:
Livre audio

Description

This is the story of how a young girl and her box of magical yarn transform a community. This modern fairy tale has the feel of a new classic.
Sortie:
Oct 1, 2014
ISBN:
9780545798747
Format:
Livre audio

À propos de l'auteur

Mac Barnett is a New York Times bestselling author whose books have been translated into more than thirty languages. His picture books include two Caldecott Honor–winning collaborations with Jon Klassen: Sam & Dave Dig a Hole and Extra Yarn. Among his other popular books are I Love You Like a Pig, illustrated by Greg Pizzoli, and The Magic Word, illustrated by Elise Parsley. He lives in Oakland, California. You can visit him online at www.macbarnett.com.


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4.5
52 évaluations / 48 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    This is a great little story! I love the sound effects and the music. Also, the narrator is very talented!
  • (5/5)
    "Extra Yarn" is a story of a small, cold, colorless town and Annabelle who finds a box filled with colorful yarn. This box of yarn seems endless as she makes colorful sweaters for everyone and everything in town, even animals, houses, and trucks. I loved the illustrations in this story. The town and people appear colorless and are placed against a white background. But, they quickly gain color as Annabelle knits everyone and everything a sweater. The change in color completely transforms the town and the mood of the story. I also liked the character of Annabelle. She is kind and giving to everyone, even those who make fun of her. For example, Nate makes fun of her and her dog's sweater by laughing "you two look ridiculous." But instead of getting upset or angry, Annabelle knits Nate a sweater anyway and he likes it. People around the world begin to hear of this box full of endless, colorful yarn, so the archduke tries to buy it from Annabelle. But Annabelle, politely denies his offer. So, the archduke steals the yarn. But once he gets it, he finds the box is empty and tosses it into the water. Eventually, it flows back to Annabelle who surprisingly finds the box isn't empty and continues to knit. From this ending, I found the big idea is you get what you give. Annabelle gave and gave, and in return she continued to receive an endless amount of yarn. On the other hand, the archduke took what did not belong to him and in the end received no yarn at all.
  • (5/5)
    A delightfully entertaining yarn!
  • (4/5)
    Pretty fun!
  • (3/5)
    In her cold and drab town, Annabelle one day discovers a box full of yarn, so she decides to knit herself a sweater. But it turns out there's extra yarn, so she knits a sweater for her dog also. As the magical box keeps producing extra yarn, Annabelle keeps knitting away ... until the day an archduke looks at her box with envy. What will Annabelle do then?This is an interesting picture book, with a fairy tale feel to it, even though it's not based on one (as far as I'm aware). The illustrations are really great, with the gray, dreary town slowly growing more colorful as Annabelle knits for everyone and everything. Although it's understated, I like how Annabelle chooses to use this magical gift to show kindness to others rather than hoarding up materials for herself (or selling them for lots of money). I could see this book working well for kids in elementary school, as either a readaloud or for them to read on their own.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this book! The illustrations were simple and worked extremely well with the story. The story was simply about a little girl who never ran out of yarn. She made sweaters and hats for everyone, even houses and animals! The Archduke offered her millions of dollars for her box, but she refused. The best part is when Annabelle has the box everything and everyone is happy and colorful in the illustrations and when the Archduke steals the box from her everything turns black and gray and grim. The text and illustrations work in harmony together to create the tone for the story. This book was a great find!
  • (5/5)
    The illustrations were really what kept this book so alive and moving along. Everything at the start of the book is dark and bland in colors. But because of the young girls love for knitting and kind heart, the pages slowly start to be filled with more and more color. It reminds me of someone who is cold hearted, and when they start to become alive and caring, their heart sparks with some red and starts to beat again (sort of like in "the Grinch").This story is about a girl who knits a sweater for her dog, and herself, and her family, and still has extra yarn. So she keeps knitting for people in her town, houses, cats, etc. and keeps going because she STILL has extra yarn. When a man from over seas offers her an insane amount of money she denies him. He sends men over to steal her box with the yarn in it, brings it all the way back, and finds an empty surprise. Really enjoyed the moral to keep giving even if it's something simple as a home-made sweater.
  • (4/5)
    This story could almost be classified as folktale. It was a great story about a little girl helping everyone by giving every person in her black and white town a colorful sweater. The archduke wants the yarn but the yarn does not work for him because he is using it for selfish reasons. There is an underlying message of you can't always get what you want, and selfishness will get you no where fast.
  • (4/5)
    What's not to love about this quietly charming book about a girl who generously gives of her time and yarn to almost literally knit the townspeople together? The Archduke who lusts after her yarn just doesn't get it.
  • (4/5)
    Gorgeous design and message, beautifully, subtly, and magically told. Artists will love it. Will children?
  • (5/5)
    Extra Yarn by Mac Barnett is illustrated by Jon Klassen, the author of I Want My Hat Back and This is Not My Hat (review coming). For fans of Klassen's books, there's a cameo tucked inside.Annabelle finds a box of yarn. It's the most colorful thing in her dreary village — a place that reminds me of the painting Jagers in de Sneeuw (1565) by Pieter Bruegel. Just imagine that snowy landscape filled with Klassen's characters, being slowly but surely covered in knitted sweaters and blankets and whatnot.Presented with a box full of yarn, Annabelle sits down and knits herself a sweater. When the box remains full of yarn she knits sweaters for all her friends and family, neighbors, and the local wildlife and pets. When she still has yarn, she yarn bombs the village and the forest until everything is colorful.It's here that her knitting draws the attention of a jealous duke. He steals the box but the yarn isn't there. It doesn't matter if you have the tools and supplies if you don't have the drive to create.
  • (5/5)
    Annabelle is a young girl who stumbles across a box of colorful yarn. She begins by knitting herself a sweater. Her generous spirit leads to her knitting sweaters for the entire town. She changes the dull, black and white town into a colorful environment. Her box of yarn is endless, that is until the mean Archduke steal it from Annabelle.
  • (4/5)
    A girl is given a box which contains an unending supply of colorful yarn. She knits for everyone in town, including inanimate objects which brighten up and beautifies her colorless town. A man hears of this and steals the box and which for him, produces nothing. The box is returned to her and she knits once again.Klassen What a beautiful story. The text describes Annabelle’s discovery of a box with a seamlessly endless supply of yarn in which she beautifies her colorless world with woven gifts. The story is wonderful and the illustrations, using an interesting pattern, become more colorful as the story and gifts progress.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, I found this accidentally because I was searching out Caldecott honor books. It is just a delight and reminiscent of "Something from Nothing" but also could be paired quite successfully with "The Three Billy Goats Fluff" by Rachael Mortimer.
  • (5/5)
    I'm hesitant to give 5 stars to books, but this one charmed the socks off of me! Wow. This story about Annabelle and her generous spirit, which comes out through her knitting, is so sweet, but so simple that it's not syrupy. It's just so adorable, it makes me want to learn to knit even more! Love the illustrations in this one, too. Bravo!

    [Speaking of knitting, RIP cousin Papatya, a talented knitter and generous spirit who passed away a week ago today. This one's for you. I bet you would've enjoyed this book too!]
  • (4/5)
    This book of course has amazing illustraions. It's about a girl who find a box full of bright,colorful yarn and begins knitting things for the entire town. The town started off extremely dark and dull until this creative little girl started to make it a colorful, happy place with her magic yarn. The archduke wanted Annabelle's magic yarn and ended up stealing it. You have to read and find out whatever happened to the yarn when it's in the hands of the villan.
  • (5/5)
    A creative cumulative tale, a colorful example of a kind of Zeno's paradox or the miracle of the loaves and fishes -- where it seems impossible, but there's always something left over and it's always enough. In this case it's Annabelle's box of yarn which allows her to spread warmth via sweaters in a cold little town on a cold afternoon. It's also an emotional warmth -- the generosity of a home-made gift. In the beginning of the book Nate's jealousy and ridicule of Annabelle is overcome by a sweater. When the remarkable girl and her infinite knitting eventually become famous, a greedy archduke (fond of clothing) attempts to buy the box. Annabelle steadfastly refuses. His subsequent midnight theft of the magic box is bested by the box itself -- which proves to be empty in his hands. And his curse on Annabelle and her future happiness, as he throws the box out the window into the sea, is reversed by it simply floating back to her. We don't actually see Annabelle opening the box at the end, so it is left to the reader to decide if the box is really empty or not. Dogs and cats are sprinkled throughout - all in colorful sweaters, of course.

    The brown blockcuts on the homemade-looking (scratchy) sepia paper backgrounds are slowly stamped with the warmth of (mainly) red, orange, and yellow pearl/knit stitches. The evil archduke is portrayed in dark browns, while the night he steals the box is washed in dark grey-green, bled to the edges.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book. It is older book, I know, but this is the first time I've read it. Such a sweet book about love and kindness. I'm looking forward to reading it on a chilly day with my elementary students. Maybe I'll read it at my 3rd-5th grade knitting club!
  • (3/5)
    Extra Yarn is a simple, but good book. The illustrations drastically enhanced the book. The town was described as “a cold little town, where everywhere you looked was either the white of snow or the black of soot from the chimneys” (pg.1). The main character then found a box that was described as “filled with yarn of every color” (pg.1). This concept of the town being black and white and dreary and the yarn being colorful was so important to the main idea of the book, and it showed in the pictures. Consistently throughout the book, everything was black and white except for this never ending colorful yarn. The illustrations did a magnificent job emphasizing the written text. I also liked the repetition. Multiple characters would sporadically comment on how Annabelle was soon going to run out of yarn, but she never did. It kept the reader wondering if she really would run out eventually while creating a nice rhythm to the book. After a few times of being questioned, the reader was able to pick up on the pattern. The big message of the book was how one person can single handedly have a positive effect on their community.
  • (3/5)
    Sweet, well-illustrated parable :)
  • (4/5)
    This book was very creative book elementary students. It was about a girl you got a magic ball of yarn that never ran out. She makes yarn sweater for everyone she meets and even some yarn art. This is a very good fiction book for students especially if you want to do a creative writing activity afterwards. The illustrations really make the book and make it easy to follow the story.
  • (5/5)
    In a cold and snowy undisclosed location, a young girl finds a box of yarn of every color and begins knitting. The yarn never runs out. If I were sharing this with children, I'd probably also compare this to the Biblical miracle of the feeding of the 5000. It's a cute story and made me laugh in a couple of places.
  • (5/5)
    This book takes the reader on a journey to a very dull town that comes alive when a girl breathes color into it using colored yarn from a magic box. She is told at first that she cannot do it but she does not give up and transforms all of the townspeople with her generosity. A rich man offers the girl millions for her magic box and even tries to steal it, but finds the magic does not work for him and the box finds its way back to its rightful owner.
  • (4/5)
    A little girls box of yarn never runs out so she creates sweaters for everyone and everything in town. Someone tries to steal the box but doesn't get very far. Love the contrast of the dark gloom juxtaposed with the gorgeous yarn colors.
  • (4/5)
    When one reads this book, you are captivated by how the town Annabelle resides in is completely gloomy. she on days comes across a box of colorful yarn. I was thoroughly engaged when reading this book because it shows how when things seem gloomy and distressing, the most out of ordinary thing can bring brightness to the world. No one would've thought that a little girl can bring such a light to the town that she lives in. The trials and tribulations allow Annabelle to be creative with how she uses the yarn. I would use this picture book in reading to a group of first graders because I feel as though they will be able to understand now being happy all of the time. They will understand the concept of being unhappy. I feel as though this book teaches everyone to find their creative side during hard times.
  • (5/5)
    Extra Yarn, written by Mac Barnett and illustrated by Jon Klassen (2012) is a Caldecott Honor book, winner of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, and is a New York Times bestseller. It tells the story of how a young girl and her box of magical yarn brings a community together. The illustrations get more colorful as the town grows more connected, and they make you fall in love this clever and thoughtful girl. In the classroom, I would use this to teach metaphor in illustrations -- Klassen shows how the townspeople are connected by "connecting" them with a piece of the colorful yarn. Also, it could be used in a unit about folklore. And, it would be a fun book to use to talk about conjunctions "and" & "but" because the author starts many of his sentences with them, and kids can decide about the effectiveness of his choice. Grades 2-5.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful illustrations with a simple but fantastic story. Love the details and texture of the illustrations.
  • (4/5)
    With very deadpan humor, this isn't going to appeal universally, but I definitely found it to be fun. There's a folkloric aspect to the text with the repetition of the knitting and the box of yarn only working for those with appropriate motives. The art is very typical of Klassen (in fact some familiar characters pop up), but I'm particularly impressed with the soot effect. I think I like that the soot doesn't go away at the end just because the town has been brightened up by Annabelle's sweaters. I also found the choices for when and which sweaters would stay connected by a thread to be thought provoking. I don't have a good guess for how this might work in preschool storytime. My inclination is that it would really work best for an older audience than preschool (K-2nd maybe?), but I would love to hear from someone who's tried it with the young ones with success.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful for all ages, particularly knitters from young to old. I laughed out loud and cheered for Annabelle and her box of endless yarn!
  • (3/5)
    A sweet story about changing a dreary place one colorful piece at a time. Annabelle lives in a cold,dismal where everything is grey. She finds a box of colorful yarn and knits herself a sweater. When she finishes, there is still more yarn, so she knits a sweater for her dog, for a bully and his dog. Annabelle's box of yarn never empties and soon everyone has a colorful sweater. This attracts the attention of an archduke, who visits and asks Annabelle to buy the box of yarn. She will not sell it, so at night, three robbers hired by the archduke steal the yarn box from Annabelle. When he arrives home the box is empty!