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Momo

Momo

Écrit par Michael Ende

Raconté par Gert Heidenreich


Momo

Écrit par Michael Ende

Raconté par Gert Heidenreich

évaluations:
4.5/5 (27 évaluations)
Longueur:
8 heures
Sortie:
May 1, 2013
ISBN:
9783844907698
Format:
Livre audio

Description

Momos Welt ist eine Großstadt, irgendwo im Süden Europas. Ein gespenstisches Heer grauer Herren ist am Werk und veranlasst immer mehr Menschen, Zeit zu sparen. Aber in Wirklichkeit betrügen sie die Menschen um diese ersparte Zeit und nehmen ihnen alle Lebensfreude. Je mehr die Menschen an Zeit sparen, desto ärmer, hastiger und kälter wird ihr Dasein. Am meisten bekommen die Kinder diese Lieblosigkeit zu spüren. Als die Not am größten ist, greift Meister Hora ein, der geheimnisvolle Verwalter der Zeit. Doch braucht er dazu die Hilfe eines Menschenkindes. Momo, die kleine struppige Heldin der Geschichte, übernimmt die schwierige Aufgabe und kämpft ganz allein, mit nichts als einer Blume in der Hand und einer Schildkröte unter dem Arm, gegen das riesige Heer der grauen Herren – und siegt auf wunderbare Weise.  
Hier geht es um die Fragen unserer Wirklichkeit, die sich in den Figuren und Schicksalen widerspiegeln – deswegen ist Michael Endes Märchen-Roman voller Poesie und Herzenswärme über den Zauber der Zeit heute immer noch und wieder aktuell und hat von seinem Reiz nach 45 Jahren nichts eingebüßt.
Sortie:
May 1, 2013
ISBN:
9783844907698
Format:
Livre audio


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4.4
27 évaluations / 25 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    I think this book is better than The Neverending Story... ignore the terrible cover that Puffin still use on the book (makes it look like something dreary/worthy about a starving orphan)and step inside.It is a wonderful, touching and imaginative tale that I can easily imagine as a very Guillermo Del Toro style fantasy. If Del Toro ever decided to do a childrens film...
  • (4/5)
    An unusually structured novel about enjoying the time you have. Momo is a waif who resists the efforts of mysterious grey men who are stealing time. The story seems oddly disjointed in places, which may be an artifact of the transation. This is nevertheless a compelling tale with interesting and well drawn characters.
  • (4/5)
    An allegorical fairy tale by the author of The Neverending Story. Momo, an orphan girl living in the ruined amphitheatre, outwits the time thieves who have persuaded the townsfolk to think only of work, money and 'saving time', with the help of Professor Hora and his prescient tortoise.
  • (5/5)
    Momo is the endearing girl with large, dark eyes who sets out to save her friends from the sinister time devourers. The book has a lovely hidden message that will hold true for many years to come - that we do not find the time to enjoy the little pleasures of life. Although intended for a younger readership, the book will appeal more to adults who will love Momo for her simplicity and courage, and love Michael Ende for his parable.
  • (4/5)
    A lot of people are preoccupied with time: How it should be spent, how it can be saved, and how to make sure it isn't wasted. Have you ever accused someone of stealing your time? Momo is the only person who is able to resist the allure of the grey men who are time thieves. An already unique child, Momo, is abandoned by all of her friends who have fallen prey to these menaces (and they really do sound menacing + the illustrations are delightfully creepy). Much like The Neverending Story, the city that Michael Ende has created feels tangible and real...actually it sounds like Rome. The characters leap off of the page. Fantasy is done right when your imagination is allowed to run rampant and a talking turtle is as ordinary as a gorilla that learns sign language (I still think that's amazing). Momo is all about making the most of your time by spending it with those that you love. I think this is an especially poignant message for adults who are bombarded with deadlines and to-do lists and children who often feel neglected by those same adults. The message is clear but the delivery is what makes Ende's writing so special and why I believe he is an underrated children's author in our country (but not in his home country of Germany!).
  • (4/5)
    A wonderful little story.
  • (4/5)
    I can see how this book would be powerful to a 4th-6th grader but I think it would have been more powerful to me, as an adult, as a short story in a science fiction collection (cut out about 150 pages). There are some excellent quotes by loveable characters like when Beppo Roadsweeper talks about sweeping "the road" and taking time to enjoy it. I had a very hard time finishing it just because there are so many more interesting reads available right now.  
  • (3/5)
    Although I had trouble getting into the story and there were times when I thought it was going on for a bit too long, it was a mostly enjoyable read. I think it would make a good novel to read out loud (perhaps to 4th/5th graders) in short bursts. I did like that Ende didn't write down to his readers, assuming that they would all be able to understand the story (no matter the age). A decent read, but not a favorite nor anything I'd want to reread.
  • (4/5)
    One of the book's central themes is the subject of time. Or rather how we choose to spend the time we have. The character Momo is a humble orphan girl who has a rare talent for patience and listening. The townsfolk find that if they share their problems with her, they gain a new understanding of them. In contrast, her adversaries (and really, everyone's adversaries) are the men in gray. These are the covert phantoms who steal and thrive on the misspent time of daily living.
  • (5/5)
    I just love this book. The only thing about it that I maybe don't like is that as a reader I can't relate thoroughly to the protagonist: she and her origins are a mystery. That aside, it's a wonderful dystopian children's fantasy quest. (Incidentally, this book is why I will never eat at a standing-up-only restaurant, and why I try not to eat standing up at home.)
  • (5/5)
    If everyone understood this book life would suck significantly less.P.S. Check out the UnSuggestions for this book, it may possibly make your entire day
  • (5/5)
    Okay, no word of a lie, this is ONE OF THE BEST CHILDREN'S STORIES EVER WRITTEN. Ende is a household name elsewhere in Europe, but here in the UK (where I'm from) he's mostly just known for The Neverending Story. That's also a good book, but this is even better. A powerful allegory about the importance of taking time to enjoy life, this story also contains (in my opinion) the most frightening baddies in the whole of children's literature. You have to read this, it's FANTASTIC.
  • (5/5)
    A singular book by Michael Ende, not nearly as well known as "The Neverending Story," but - in my opinion - just as meaningful, and a great deal more succinct. That longer and more famous novel is about the power of stories; this is about the power of time. Both long for the simplicity of youth and, in so doing, try to warn child readers against growing up the wrong way (both also feature friendly protagonists subsumed by the power they are given). As a result, they're a bit heavy-handed - but in the sense of an old-time fairy tale, where the morality lesson is clear, but carefully sewn into the fabric ofthe story. Kids shouldn't be put off by the technique.More simply: where else can you find the Buddhist parable of life and death put in simple child's terms? _Acceptable_ terms, too, without pulling any punches? Perhaps Ende was inspired - or more aptly, horrified - by the rise of fascism during his own childhood, within his own country. Can it be any coincidence that "Momo" is set in a fictional Italian village, where "grey men" invade and set to work making sure everything runs on time?Like "The Neverending Story" - and the inevitable comparison is a bit unfortunate, because "Momo" works so well on its own terms - this is a 'hard' children's novel, but a worthwhile one. It certainly does not deserve the obscurity it suffers in the English-speaking world. Someone should take a chance and reprint this, right away.
  • (5/5)
    I first started Momo back in 1995 just before graduating from UCSB. As it was a library book, I had to return the book in order to graduate! I never got past the point where the grey men start to plot against Momo. At long last I have been able to finish the book!
  • (3/5)
    I was motivated to read Momo as a potentially quick read auf Deutsch, which it was. The story dragged a bit in parts, especially the last third, also not unexpected. To my pleasant surprise, the allegory was clever enough to keep my interest even as I refreshed my vocabulary and verb tenses. I'm intrigued by, yet formally unfamiliar with allegory as a literary device. Clearly Momo provides an extended metaphor; it seems to me it works on at least two levels, perhaps this is typical.For one, the characters are allegorical: Momo standing in as Peter Pan, the ideal of eternal childhood; Gigi embodies the wonder of child-like play and imagination; Beppo emphasizes the importance of living in the present moment, the eternal present. For another, the plot or in any case, basic dynamics also are allegorical, arguing for the toxic influence of modernity as manifested in efficiency, an emphasis upon material or empirical results, and a preference for commerce as social interaction. It's tempting to see the Grey Men as another example of character allegory, but really they are the external manifestation of people living into a modern life, the way time is stolen even as every effort is made to streamline and waste not a moment, the erosion of community and care which follows, the resulting drab existence. Then too, the Grey Men are an outward manifestation of a certain relationship of self to oneself, to others, to the world; so, a means of understanding an abstraction.The ending doesn't quite work as allegory: it fits Momo's character, that she help bring about the end of the Grey Men, but without really changing who she is. She experiences no growth, just "fitness" or an adventure based on who she is, how she interacts with others. But Ende is foremost a storyteller, it's clear the ending fits the story, and not the allegory, and he's to be commended for that.//Variation on the Ship of Perseus, with a twist: is the Earth we are on the original, or merely a copy, made from the raw material of a previous Earth? [47-8]Die Drei Brueder: one always at home, one you've always just missed, the other is just coming now .... [154]This edition on cream paper with brown ink, and including line drawing tailpieces and occasional full-page line drawing illustrations throughout.
  • (5/5)
    One of the books that influenced my world view growing up.
  • (4/5)
    Some books that you read as a child make a lasting impression. You never forget them. However, it is not always a good idea to reread them as an adult. Times change, you've grown up, you've read so many more books that you've become a more critical reader. You remember a book as absolutely scaring or sad, but when you read it again, the magic is gone.Momo, however, is a book does stand the test of time. On a superficial level it is an adventure of a little girl fighting an army of scary grey men, who steal time. But on a deeper level, it is an ode to the imagination, an ode to friendship and an ode to the beauty of life. It was lovely to read this again, I loved the chapter about the children's fantasies, because it made me remember what it was like to be a child. The book also made me think about my present busy live, the way the hours disappear and how all this adult business gets me so hurried up that I sometimes forget about the truer, and more important things in life.
  • (5/5)
    One of the books that influenced my world view growing up.
  • (4/5)
    Momo, even though disguised as a children's book, has deep philosophical discussion. What should we be doing with our time here? How should we work, play, and be with friends?No matter what someone thinks about these kind of things, time spent reading Momo is definitely time well spent.
  • (4/5)
    the opening kinda bland , I don't know , maybe because I already over with over-description thingie . but the rest is fine . And later I found out that this michael ende also write neverending story . woww !! I love neverending story !! so I will give +1 rating for this book :D
  • (5/5)
    I hadn’t read this in a long, long time... probably 10 or 15 years ago, and I’m very delighted I dug up a copy. I’d forgotten enough of it that it sucked me in all over again. The magic was still there :) Be bold and daring! Request the book through the library and dive into it sight unseen. Speaking of sight unseen, I realized at the end of the book that while it was illustrated, the artist never forced a face on me. I am left to picture Momo as my pretty little head sees fit. Kinda like a nice MUD I know...It was originally written in German, and according to Amazon it was made into a movie in 1985 or so, but the film seems to have been released in German with no subtitles. I bet I understand more of it than if it were in Finnish!If the author’s name looks familiar, he also wrote The Never Ending Story, another great read.
  • (5/5)
    Momo is one of my favorite books of all time. In general, I love Michael Ende…if you ever have the time I highly recommend reading both Momo and the Never-ending Story. But let’s just talk about Momo for now. She is a “lost girl” that just appears in the city. However she has a special power…she listens! She actually listens to people in a way that they can pour their hearts out and talk and talk; find their own ideas, resolve disputes, whatever. Then something happens…the grey men come to town. Who are they? They are exactly that, head to toe grey people, dress in grey, with grey cigars…what do they want? Your time…as in they literally want you to give them your free time, so they convince you to “save” your money, instead of taking your time, enjoying what you do…do it in a hurry and that way you will be able to have tons of time later in your life…Ok this time I am really not giving away any of the exciting things of the book. But I would like to tell you what captivates me the most of these 2 books. In both of them Ende touches the subject of how when you grow up you stop daydreaming and taking your time. Both, at least for me, underline the importance of the inner child, of letting go of stressful situations, of feeling the grass under your feet, of dreaming with impossible worlds in which anything is actually possible. I forget really often what it feels to be a kid. One of my “kid” moments is when I get to wear heels. Don’t laugh…when I wear heels and I hear the sound of my feet against the floor I remember when I was a little girl and would here the “grown-ups” clacking their way in the street. The first time I heard that sound coming from my feet, a ping of excitement crawled inside of me and since then, every time I hear it I can’t help but smile and feel like I’m 7 again…
  • (4/5)
    Ein wunderschönes Buch, und eine treffende Metapher für die heutige Zeit – treffender noch als damals, als es geschrieben wurde. Angenehm langsamer, bedächtiger Stil, passend zum Thema des Buches. Dabei aber sehr gerade. Die Geschichte ist wenig ausgeschmückt, die Figuren bleiben flach, plakativ, nicht sehr lebensecht. Vielleicht hat Ende das Buch deshalb als Märchen bezeichnet? Die Allegorie, das Gesamtbild ist wichtiger als Tiefe in Charakteren wie Handlung. Deshalb hat mir das Buch letztlich nicht so gut gefallen wie ich es aus meiner Kindheit in Erinnerung hatte. Trotzdem bleibt es sehr beeindruckend. Mit Wucht führt der Autor uns vor Augen, wie unnütz das allgegenwärtige Gehetze ist, und wie viel wertvoller Zeit ist als Geld. Dafür hat es sich die vier Sterne redlich verdient, und natürlich hatte ich trotz der genannten Einschränkungen Spaß an der Geschichte. Immer noch und immer wieder lesenswert.
  • (5/5)
    Originally posted at Read. Run. Study.This book has always been a favorite in my family. I enjoyed this book when I read it as a child, and also enjoyed rereading it now as an adult. The characters are likable and the concepts are well done. I easily saw myself in the time savers as I realized how much effort I expend on improving efficiency without feeling like I have gained the time I tried so hard to save. I found this especially haunting given that the book was originally written in the early 70's. Overall, this is a cute story with a great message to children and adults alike - take time to slow down and relax.
  • (4/5)
    Ende is so well-known for 'The Never Ending Story' that it'd be easy to overlook his other work - and that would be a shame. 'Momo' is relatively brief, in places a smidgen disjointed, but overall a nice little tale, and I'll be keeping my worn-out paperback somewhere safe so that my own little girl can one day enjoy it.