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évaluations:
4.5/5 (56 évaluations)
Longueur:
67 pages
44 minutes
Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 18, 2010
ISBN:
9780062009661
Format:
Livre

Description

Written by Scribd Editors

Named a New York Times Outstanding Children's Book, Stone Fox is a heartwarming, uplifting tale about one boy's journey to pay the back taxes on his grandfather's farm with the purse from a dog sled race he enters.

Author John Reynolds Gardiner first heard the legend that inspired Stone Fox while in Idaho and it became his first published work. His other works include How to Live a Life That's Not Boring. Stone Fox is a thrilling, action-packed tale that has captivated readers for over thirty years.

When Little Willy's grandfather falls ill, he is no longer able to work the farm, which is in danger of foreclosure. Little Willy becomes determined to win the National Dogsled Race—the prize money would save the farm and his grandfather. But he isn't the only one who desperately wants to win. Willy and his brave dog Searchlight must face off against experienced racers, including a Native American man named Stone Fox, who has never lost a race.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 18, 2010
ISBN:
9780062009661
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

John Reynolds Gardiner (1944–2006), who described himself as an “author, engineer, inventor, rock-and-roll singer, door-to-door salesman, songwriter, and Santa Claus,” traveled widely throughout his life. Born in California, he lived in Ireland, Germany, Italy, El Salvador, England, and Mexico. He heard the legend that inspired Stone Fox while in Idaho and it became his first published work. His other works include How to Live a Life That’s Not Boring.

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Aperçu du livre

Stone Fox - John Reynolds Gardiner

1

GRANDFATHER

ONE DAY GRANDFATHER wouldn’t get out of bed. He just lay there and stared at the ceiling and looked sad.

At first little Willy thought he was playing.

Little Willy lived with his grandfather on a small potato farm in Wyoming. It was hard work living on a potato farm, but it was also a lot of fun. Especially when Grandfather felt like playing.

Like the time Grandfather dressed up as the scarecrow out in the garden. It took little Willy an hour to catch on. Boy, did they laugh. Grandfather laughed so hard he cried. And when he cried his beard filled up with tears.

Grandfather always got up real early in the morning. So early that it was still dark outside. He would make a fire. Then he would make breakfast and call little Willy. Hurry up or you’ll be eating with the chickens, he would say. Then he would throw his head back and laugh.

Once little Willy went back to sleep. When he woke up, he found his plate out in the chicken coop. It was picked clean. He never slept late again after that.

That is . . . until this morning. For some reason Grandfather had forgotten to call him. That’s when little Willy discovered that Grandfather was still in bed. There could be only one explanation. Grandfather was playing. It was another trick.

Or was it?

Get up, Grandfather, little Willy said. I don’t want to play anymore.

But Grandfather didn’t answer.

Little Willy ran out of the house.

A dog was sleeping on the front porch. Come on, Searchlight! little Willy cried out. The dog jumped to its feet and together they ran off down the road.

Searchlight was a big black dog. She had a white spot on her forehead the size of a silver dollar. She was an old dog—actually born on the same day as little Willy, which was over ten years ago.

A mile down the road they came to a small log cabin surrounded by tall trees. Doc Smith was sitting in a rocking chair under one of the trees, reading a book.

Doc Smith, little Willy called out. He was out of breath. Come quick.

What seems to be the matter, Willy? the doctor asked, continuing to read.

Doc Smith had snow white hair and wore a long black dress. Her skin was tan and her face was covered with wrinkles.

Grandfather won’t answer me, little Willy said.

Probably just another trick, Doc Smith replied. Nothing to worry about.

But he’s still in bed.

Doc Smith turned a page and continued to read. How late did you two stay up last night?

We went to bed early, real early. No singing or music or anything.

Doc Smith stopped reading.

Your grandfather went to bed without playing his harmonica? she asked.

Little Willy nodded.

Doc Smith shut

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Ce que les gens pensent de Stone Fox

4.4
56 évaluations / 24 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    Stone Fox was a touching story for young readers based on a Rocky Mountain legend. I loved Little Willie's determination to win the ten mile sled race, with the help of his beloved dog, Searchlight, and save his grandfather's farm. Even though I suspected how the book would end, I was desperately hoping I would be wrong. It was still a shock when it happened, and so sad. However, I appreciated the way the big Indian, Stone Fox, stepped in and did what he did. A sweet, heart-wrenching read.
  • (4/5)
    Stone Fox is about a loyal dog that helps a young boy named Willy out in a desperate time of need. After WIlly's grandfather becomes ill after finding out that he is has no money and will no longer be allowed to live on the farm. Willy decides to begin training for a race that will help them save the farm. This race is a daring feat against a man who has never lost. After much training and hard work this dog proves to be a true companion till the end.
  • (5/5)
    Awesome. Tragic.
  • (4/5)
    A classic tale about a boy names Little Willy who enters into a dog sled race with his long time dog and friend, Searchlight in order to win $500 to pay the back taxes on his grandfathers farm (who refuses to get out of bed). The book ends with Searchlight dying during the last leg of the race and Willy carrying him across the finish line as Stone Fox (their biggest competition) stops the other racers from crossing a line in the snow.
  • (5/5)
    Evocative black and white illustrations enhance a simply told story, recreating a simpler world of the past, where small boys could try to save the family farm and neighbors would do all they could to help. Willy’s grandfather has always cared for him. But now it’s Willy’s turn and he’ll do anything he can to bring his grandfather's mind back from the brink. But powerful banks conspire against him, and there’s only way Willy can raise the necessary money. Unfortunately someone else needs that money too. So how will need and luck play out?The story pulls the reader in right from the start. Willy’s kindness shines through. And Willy’s dog is truly delightful. But things weren’t always easy even in simpler times, and good people didn’t always win. The end of the race stays in doubt until the final pages as words fly by.Tragic, beautiful and kind, Stone Fox is a story to linger in the mind of young readers, inspiring questions, thought and hope.Disclosure: A good friend knew I’d love it and she was right.
  • (5/5)
    When grandfather has an apparent stroke, 10 year old Little Willie finds himself the sole caretaker of both Grandfather and the farm. In danger of losing the homestead and against all advice, Willie and his pet, Searchlight, enter the dogsled race in order to win the prize money and pay off the taxes on the farm. He is up against Stone Fox, the mysterious Native American who has never lost a race. Stone Fox needs the money to buy back land stolen from his people. Well written and fast paced, this book pulls you in and keeps you interested through the exciting race and its surprising ending--which Gardiner says was presented as a true story. A winner!
  • (2/5)
    So I was like 10 pages from the end when my daughter comes home from school and sees me reading. She says, "Oh, that's a sad book." Thanks a bunch!She was right. It was sad.
  • (5/5)
    Ten year old Willy is a determined young man who is bound to help is Grandfather find the will to live and save is potato farm, by racing in a dogsled race agains Stone Fox, an Indian who has never lost a race. The book brings to life the relationship that forms between a young boy and his dog, and his determination to never give up even in the face of great odds. It is a beautful book to use with a group of students betwee 3-5 grade. I highly recommend it to teachers and to families to enjoy together.
  • (5/5)
    *warning! spoilers!*Okay, I admit it, this was a good book. I didn't expect it to be... It does have some qualities that are common with all the other dogsled-race books out there, and I didn't think it would be much different. But it was so wonderful. And of course I cried at the end. The wonderful dog gave it all she had, and died before reaching the finish line... And my heart sank, it was over. But Stone Fox knew Willy deserved that win, and he made it happen. It was so awesome!
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a young boy whose only family is his elderly grandfather. They live on a potato farm and they heavily rely on the harvest to make ends meet. One day the grandfather gets very ill and is no longer able to communicate. Willy is forced to become the man of the house and try to save his grandfathers farm. With the towns support, the love of his grandfather and the help of a very special dog, Searchlight, Willie will enter the race of a lifetime.
  • (5/5)
    This was one of the first chapter books I have ever read. The exciting story about the boy racing his favorite sled dog to get prize money to save the family farm was gripping. Not too hard or too long either. Even though I am a grown-up now, the ending surprised me and moved me. It was exciting, and it made me think.
  • (1/5)
    "Stone Fox" is the story of a boy and his dog who work together to save his farm. After years of not paying taxes, Grandfather is in trouble of losing his farm. He all but gives up on life, no longer getting out of bed or eating much. When little Willy learns of the need to raise $500 to pay the taxes, he decides to enter himself and his ten-year-old dog in a sled race. So intent on saving his grandfather and his farm, not even the thought of racing against the legendary Stone Fox can deter little Willy from racing. His undying belief in his dog, Searchlight, convinces him he will win. But can he defeat the Stone Fox and his team of Samoyed sled dogs?I did not like this book at all. I know that's not a popular take, but it's true. The writing was simplistic and lacked detail. The characters were underdeveloped which caused me not to take any interest in them at all, particularly Grandfather. Furthermore, I'm not generally a fan of animal books, especially when the animal dies. However, as an animal book, the story accomplished its mission of showing the devotion of a pet towards its owner. Searchlight's heart bursts as she desperately tries to get little Willy and the sled over the finish line to finish the race. It also shows the devotion of people towards animals, both in the way little Willy loved Searchlight and in the way Stone Fox made sure little Willy was able to take Searchlight across the finish line. Appropriate for 3rd grade and up.
  • (4/5)
    Where there is a will there is a way...so the saying goes and this is the main thread running through this tale of love and devotion between family (even when the child must pay for the mistake of the adult) and between dogs and their owners. Classroom Use: Discuss taxes and too bring it down to a child's perspective use pennies and have students purchase squares of the classroom as their land but make them pay taxes.
  • (3/5)
    Well! The sudden ending certainly got me verklempt! It seemed emotionally manipulative and the portrayal of Stone Fox the Indian is a bit touchy in this day and age. But Little Willy's Disneyesque earnestness and the compelling story action actually make it work, even though part of me feels like it shouldn't. Go figure!
  • (4/5)
    Of course I read this when I was in teacher-training, and at least one of my sons read it with his class, but I decided to see if I like it on it's own merits, as a reader with my own interests. And I do. Imo, it's just as exciting and moving outside the school setting as it can be inside (with the right teacher, like Horrible Harry's teacher). Concise - lots of powerful ideas in a very short book. Definitely not obsolete (though it is historical fiction and a few words & ideas might need to be explained).
  • (3/5)
    I found the character of Grandfather to be positively contemptible. The book was poorly named and the prize for the race seemed a bit too "deus ex machina" for my taste.Other than that, Little Willy and Searchlight were adorable. It is a very simple, quick read that I found perfect for my special education children.
  • (5/5)
    A boy tries to save his grandfather's farm.
  • (5/5)
    So much is packed into this story...how a child deals with an adult who checks out of the world; how pride keeps us from asking others for help; how determination can take us so far but often it comes down to needing someone else's help to finish our task. There is also a lesson on potato farming and dog sledding. In the midst of all of this is a touching story that brought tears to my eyes.
  • (5/5)
    Tickets ride Have you ever been adopted? Gary Paulsen is all about wilderness. Lottie and Billy were heading west in search of Francis parents but on the way there. They saw a died mule and some Mexican. My favorite character is Francis because he is brave he has a shot gun and he rides horses. It was hot in organ. I recommend this book to people who had to search for their parents. this is one of my favorite books. .
  • (3/5)
    Yikes. Such a good book yet so depressing. AND the ending. UGH ! It didn't hold my 9 years olds attention but I enjoyed it. The subject was a little heavy and sad and of course, left me in tears :(
  • (4/5)
    Little Willy can't figure out why his grandfather won't get out of bed until the doctor tells him that his grandfather has simply lost his will to live. Little Willy soon finds out the reason why is they are at risk of losing their farm to tax collectors but he has a plan to win a dog sled race with his dog Searchlight that would award enough money to save the farm. This is a relatively simple tale with a major twist that will leave readers shocked. The repetition, short sentences,occasional illustrations and relatively simple language mean this is a great first chapter book for early readers aged 7-9.
  • (1/5)
    Where is the rest of the book? It only has a few pages of the first chapter...
  • (5/5)
    I read this book to my children at night for bedtime. They loved the story and couldn’t wait for the next night to keep reading. It’s a very heartwarming story I cried reading the last chapter.
  • (4/5)
    It was an amazing story, filled with sadness and joy. I think, personally, that this book could have explained more at the end.