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Peter Pan Complete Text

Peter Pan Complete Text

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Peter Pan Complete Text

évaluations:
3.5/5 (160 évaluations)
Longueur:
192 pages
3 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jun 8, 2010
ISBN:
9780062023414
Format:
Livre

Description

Meet Peter Pan, the magical boy who refuses to grow up. One night, while looking for his shadow, Peter and Tinker Bell fly into the home of the Darling family. In no time, Peter has the Darling children soaring through the air, out the window, and off to Neverland, an island where mermaids swim, the lost boys roam, and the evil pirate, Captain Hook, plots his revenge.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jun 8, 2010
ISBN:
9780062023414
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

J. M. Barrie (1860–1937) was a Scottish author best known for creating Peter Pan. Born in the small town of Kirriemuir, Barrie was the ninth of ten children. When he was six years old, his older brother David died just before turning fourteen. Both Barrie and his mother took comfort in the idea that David would remain a boy forever, never growing old. Barrie never had children of his own, but was the legal guardian of five brothers, known collectively as the Davies boys, who are widely recognized as the inspiration for the character of Peter Pan.

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Peter Pan Complete Text - J. M. Barrie

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CHAPTER 1

Peter Breaks Through

All children, except one, grow up. They soon know that they will grow up, and the way Wendy knew was this. One day when she was two years old she was playing in a garden, and she plucked another flower and ran with it to her mother. I suppose she must have looked rather delightful, for Mrs. Darling put her hand to her heart and cried, Oh, why can’t you remain like this for ever! This was all that passed between them on the subject, but henceforth Wendy knew that she must grow up. You always know after you are two. Two is the beginning of the end.

Of course they lived at 14, and until Wendy came her mother was the chief one. She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet mocking mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the other, that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there is always one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that Wendy could never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the right-hand corner.

The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss. Wendy thought Napoleon could have got it, but I can picture him trying, and then going off in a passion, slamming the door.

Mr. Darling used to boast to Wendy that her mother not only loved him but respected him. He was one of those deep ones who know about stocks and shares. Of course no one really knows, but he quite seemed to know, and he often said stocks were up and shares were down in a way that would have made any woman respect him.

Mrs. Darling was married in white, and at first she kept the books perfectly, almost gleefully, as if it were a game, not so much as a Brussels sprout was missing; but by and by whole cauliflowers dropped out, and instead of them there were pictures of babies without faces. She drew them when she should have been totting up. They were Mrs. Darling’s guesses.

Wendy came first, then John, then Michael.

For a week or two after Wendy came it was doubtful whether they would be able to keep her, as she was another mouth to feed. Mr. Darling was frightfully proud of her, but he was very honourable, and he sat on the edge of Mrs. Darling’s bed, holding her hand and calculating expenses, while she looked at him imploringly. She wanted to risk it, come what might, but that was not his way; his way was with a pencil and a piece of paper, and if she confused him with suggestions he had to begin at the beginning again.

Now don’t interrupt, he would beg of her.

I have one pound seventeen here, and two and six at the office; I can cut off my coffee at the office, say ten shillings, making two nine and six, with your eighteen and three makes three nine seven, with five naught naught in my cheque-book makes eight nine seven,—who is that moving?—eight nine seven, dot and carry seven—don’t speak, my own—and the pound you lent to that man who came to the door—quiet, child—dot and carry child—there, you’ve done it!—did I say nine nine seven? yes, I said nine nine seven; the question is, can we try it for a year on nine nine seven?

Of course we can, George, she cried. But she was prejudiced in Wendy’s favour, and he was really the grander character of the two.

Remember mumps, he warned her almost threateningly, and off he went again. Mumps one pound, that is what I have put down, but I daresay it will be more like thirty shillings—don’t speak—measles one five, German measles half a guinea, makes two fifteen six—don’t waggle your finger—whooping-cough, say fifteen shillings—and so on it went, and it added up differently each time, but at last Wendy just got through, with mumps reduced to twelve six, and the two kinds of measles treated as one.

There was the same excitement over John, and Michael had even a narrower squeak; but both were kept, and soon, you might have seen the three of them going in a row to Miss Fulsom’s Kindergarten school, accompanied by their nurse.

Mrs. Darling loved to have everything just so, and Mr. Darling had a passion for being exactly like his neighbours; so, of course, they had a nurse. As they were poor, owing to the amount of milk the children drank, this nurse was a prim Newfoundland dog, called Nana, who had belonged to no one in particular until the Darlings engaged her. She had always thought children important, however, and the Darlings had become acquainted with her in Kensington Gardens, where she spent most of her spare time peeping into perambulators, and was much hated by careless nursemaids, whom she followed to their homes and complained of to their mistresses. She proved to be quite a treasure of a nurse. How thorough she was at bath-time, and up at any moment of the night if one of her charges made the slightest cry. Of course her kennel was in the nursery. She had a genius for knowing when a cough is a thing to have no patience with and when it needs stocking round your throat. She believed to her last day in old-fashioned remedies like rhubarb leaf, and made sounds of contempt over all this new-fangled talk about germs, and so on. It was a lesson in propriety to see her escorting the children to school, walking sedately by their side when they were well behaved, and butting them back into line if they strayed. On John’s footer days she never once forgot his sweater, and she usually carried an umbrella in her mouth in case of rain. There is a room in the basement of Miss Fulsom’s school where the nurses wait. They sat on forms, while Nana lay on the floor, but that was the only difference. They affected to ignore her as of an inferior social status to themselves, and she despised their light talk. She resented visits to the nursery from Mrs. Darling’s friends, but if they did come she first whipped off Michael’s pinafore and put him into the one with blue braiding, and smoothed out Wendy and made a dash at John’s hair.

No nursery could possibly have been conducted more correctly, and Mr. Darling knew it, yet he sometimes wondered uneasily whether the neighbours talked.

He had his position in the city to consider.

Nana also troubled him in another way. He had sometimes a feeling that she did not admire him. I know she admires you tremendously, George, Mrs. Darling would assure him, and then she would sign to the children to be specially nice to father. Lovely dances followed, in which the only other servant, Liza, was sometimes allowed to join. Such a midget she looked in her long skirt and maid’s cap, though she had sworn, when engaged, that she would never see ten again. The gaiety of those romps! And gayest of all was Mrs. Darling, who would pirouette so wildly that all you could see of her was the kiss, and then if you had dashed at her you might have got it. There never was a simpler happier family until the coming of Peter Pan.

Mrs. Darling first heard of Peter when she was tidying up her children’s minds. It is the nightly custom of every good mother after her children are asleep to rummage in their minds and put things straight for next morning, repacking into their proper places the many articles that have wandered during the day. If you could keep awake (but of course you can’t) you would see your own mother doing this, and you would find it very interesting to watch her. It is quite like tidying up drawers. You would see her on her knees, I expect, lingering humorously over some of your contents, wondering where on earth you had picked this thing up, making discoveries sweet and not so sweet, pressing this to her cheek as if it were as nice as a kitten, and hurriedly stowing that out of sight. When you wake in the morning, the naughtinesses and evil passions with which you went to bed have been folded up small and placed at the bottom of your mind, and on the top, beautifully aired, are spread out your prettier thoughts, ready for you to put on.

I don’t know whether you have ever seen a map of a person’s mind. Doctors sometimes draw maps of other parts of you, and your own map can become intensely interesting, but catch them trying to draw a map of a child’s mind, which is not only confused, but keeps going round all the time. There are zigzag lines on it, just like your temperature on a card, and these are probably roads in the island, for the Neverland is always more or less an island, with astonishing splashes of colour here and there, and coral reefs and rakish-looking craft in the offing, and savages and lonely lairs, and gnomes who are mostly tailors, and caves through which a river runs, and princes with six elder brothers, and a hut fast going to decay, and one very small old lady with a hooked nose. It would be an easy map if that were all, but there is also first day at school, religion, fathers, the round pond, needle-work, murders, hangings, verbs that take the dative, chocolate pudding day, getting into braces, say ninety-nine, three-pence for pulling out your tooth yourself, and so on, and either these are part of the island or they are another map showing through, and it is all rather confusing, especially as nothing will stand still.

Of course the Neverlands vary a good deal. John’s for instance, had a lagoon with flamingoes flying over it at which John was shooting, while Michael, who was very small, had a flamingo with lagoons flying over it. John lived in a boat turned upside down on the sands, Michael in a wigwam, Wendy in a house of leaves deftly sewn together. John had no friends, Michael had friends at night, Wendy had a pet wolf forsaken by its parents. But on the whole the Neverlands have a family resemblance, and if they stood still in a row you could say of them that they have each other’s nose, and so forth. On these magic shores children at play are for ever beaching their coracles. We too have been there; we can still hear the sound of the surf, though we shall land no more.

Of all delectable islands the Neverland is the snuggest and most compact, not large and sprawly, you know, with tedious distances between one adventure and another, but nicely crammed. When you play at it by day with the chairs and tablecloth, it is not in the least alarming, but in the two minutes before you go to sleep it becomes very nearly real. That is why there are night-lights.

Occasionally in her travels through her children’s minds Mrs. Darling found things she could not understand, and of these quite the most perplexing was the word Peter. She knew of no Peter, and yet he was here and there in John and Michael’s minds, while Wendy’s began to be scrawled all over with him. The name stood out in bolder letters than any of the other words, and as Mrs. Darling gazed she felt that it had an oddly cocky appearance.

Yes, he is rather cocky, Wendy admitted with regret. Her mother had been questioning her.

But who is he, my pet?

He is Peter Pan, you know, mother.

At first Mrs. Darling did not know, but after thinking back into her childhood she just remembered a Peter Pan who was said to live with the fairies. There were odd stories about him, as that when children died he went part of the way with them, so that they should not be frightened. She had believed in him at the time, but now that she was married and full of sense she quite doubted whether there was any such person.

Besides, she said to Wendy, he would be grown up by this time.

Oh no, he is n’t grown up, Wendy assured her confidently, and he is just my size. She meant that he was her size in both mind and body; she did n’t know how she knew it, she just knew it.

Mrs. Darling consulted Mr. Darling, but he smiled pooh-pooh. Mark my words, he said, it is some nonsense Nana has been putting into their heads; just the sort of idea a dog would have. Leave it alone, and it will blow over.

But it would not blow over, and soon the troublesome boy gave Mrs. Darling quite a shock.

Children have the strangest adventures without being troubled by them. For instance, they may remember to mention, a week after the event happened, that when they were in the wood they met their dead father and had a game with him. It was in this casual way that Wendy one morning made a disquieting revelation. Some leaves of a tree had been found on the nursery floor, which certainly were not there when the children went to bed, and Mrs. Darling was puzzling over them when Wendy said with a tolerant smile:

I do believe it is that Peter again!

Whatever do you mean, Wendy?

It’s so naughty of him not to wipe, Wendy said, sighing. She was a tidy child.

She explained in quite a matter-of-fact way that she thought

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Ce que les gens pensent de Peter Pan Complete Text

3.7
160 évaluations / 135 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    I've always loved the story of Peter Pan and finally got around to reading the book. I think that it brought out the character of Peter more than I was used to and I really enjoyed that.
  • (5/5)
    This was so fun to read, my introduction to Peter Pan was in 1955 when Mary Martin did the TV presentation. This follows what I remember of the TV performance as I remember it. It brought back so many nice memories.
  • (3/5)
    3.5

    This was better than I expected. The ending brought it all full circle. A nice little touching piece with the theme of childhood intertwining with the yarn.
  • (1/5)
    23 (re-read) Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up, by J. M. Barrie. This was on Starrett's 1955 list of "books which will live", and I forgot to check my list of books read and so read it. It seemed so familiar, but I did not think I had actually read it. But I did--tho probably not in play form, as this was. It is so saccharine, I really cannot say as an adult it is worth reading. (read Aug. 8, 1998)
  • (4/5)
    Although the story was very familiar to me, I don’t recall ever reading the book before. I saw the Mary Martin version on TV as a child. It struck me this time around how odd the plot is, with everyone expecting Wendy to assume the role of mother to Peter and the Lost Boys. Things have changed in the century since this book was written. Infant and child mortality was a lot higher in the early 20th century than it is now. Women’s mortality from childbirth (or other causes) was also a lot higher then. Children who had lost their mothers, or who had friends or relations who had lost their mothers, might see themselves among the motherless children of Neverland. The story may not resonate with 21st century children in the same way, and that’s a good thing.
  • (5/5)
    Find this review and more at On The Shelf!I absolutely LOVE Tinkerbell, and I am ashamed to say I had never readPeter Panonly seen the Disney version, so I decided to change that and grabbed the audiobook from the library. I thought it was so good and I am glad I finally decided to read it. The language is much different from nowadays of course, but it was still really great. Well-written and very fun, Barrie created a marvelous story for kids and adults. The Neverland world is so creative and must have been such a pleasure for Barrie to write. A little bit of the humor slipped by me since it was written so long ago, but not much. I really enjoyed the reader as well, especially when he did the classic nasally Captain Hook voice we all know so well! The characters were really great as well. The lost boys were adorable and Peter was so stubborn. The only character I really didn’t care much for was the father because he was so incredibly whiny and at one point argued with the youngest child just like a little kid. I liked the way the story ended and I even saw a bunch of references from the movie Hook that I never knew were from the book. If you like classics, this is a must read book! Fun, well-written, wonderful classic, fast read, one for my library!
  • (4/5)
    I knew the basic story of Peter Pan; still, I was a little surprised at just how dark the book is. I loved the writing style, and the adventure and excitement, but the ending and Peter in general made me sad.I tried to read this with my 6-year-old, but had a hard time keeping his interest. He loved the illustrations and interactive elements of this gorgeous edition.
  • (3/5)
    A children's classic I couldn't believe I'd never read! This Peter is a much darker and more sinister version than my perceptions from popular culture but this gives the original story a different dimension. I very much enjoyed it in a melancholy kind of way.
  • (5/5)
    Totally charming! Jim Dale's audio narration is superb!
  • (4/5)
    I read this *after* reading about how sad J.M. Barrie was, and his mother, after losing his teenage brother. It puts a weird spin on the entire story, and it already seems quite dated ("redskins" "Indians") and surreal even without the fantastic elements. Why was the dog the children's nanny?It's a fun story, but there were just sad and odd undertones throughout, it was hard to forget the psychology and sadness around it.
  • (1/5)
    Somethingh about Victorian novelists - they come up with great idea but execute them terribly - Peter Pan and Dracula are two iconic figures that are virtually unreadable in the original
  • (4/5)
    This is the original Peter Pan story written in 1911. It is so funny, and I really enjoyed it! After seeing all the movies and stories over the years, it was interesting to read the original author's words. I would recommend this one!
  • (4/5)
    Don't be fooled: this is the novel reprinted under the title of the play. If you're looking for the play try OUP's Peter Pan and Other Plays.I am given to understand that Barrie tinkered with the story over a thirty year period, so that although the play premièred before the novel, the text as published in 1928 represents Barrie's final conception. The novel is a snapshot of an earlier vision. There are distinct differences. In the play Peter is clearly dead. There were a couple of suggestions here that Barrie had that in mind, but Neverland appears to be more a place of the imagination. The play is crystallised and the novel more fluid. Which you prefer is very subjective. I prefer the play, but don't want to underrate the novel which is written with great charm and real moments of magic.
  • (5/5)
    A delightful tale for the young and young at heart. Adapted and retold many times in film and other books, the story of Peter Pan is one that will live in our hearts forever. If you've enjoyed any of the adaptations, I highly encourage you to go back to the source and read the original.
  • (4/5)
    I love this edition of the story. The illustrations added so much to it and kept me so intrigued with what was happening. Minalima did a GREAT job and I can't wait to see what book they come out with next. That said, this is a children's classic and if you're looking for the Disney version of the story this is not it, though they didn't stray too, too far from the original. I would recommend this story to anyone. 4.5 out of 5 stars.
  • (2/5)
    The children’s classic is a rather difficult read. Most of us know that it takes place in the British home of the Darlings. The three children (Wendy, John, and Michael) leave their home with Peter Pan for Neverland. There, Wendy becomes the mother for Peter Pan and the Lost Boys. They get into tons of mischief, and in some cases kill the enemy (something the cartoon would never depict). Eventually, the children get homesick. They all (Lost Boys included) fly back to London where they grow up. But that doesn’t stop Peter Pan from coming back ad visiting Wendy. Details: This book was written to interest children in grades 4-6 and is on a 6.1 reading level.
  • (5/5)
    This is the classic story of Peter Pan, a lost boy who lives in Neverland. Peter meets Wendy, Micheal, and John on the mainland. With the help of a little fairy dust, they all fly to Neverland, where they spend "many moons" with the other lost boys who have no mothers. Wendy takes over the position as their mother and the group go on many adventures, battling with Captain Hook, whom Pan kills in the end. Peter Pan never wants to grow up and he never does. In the end, the entire group goes back to the mainland where they eventually grow up, but Peter stays behind, going back for Wendy once a year until she is grown. Wendy marries and has a daughter named Jane and being how Wendy is too big to fly, Peter takes Jane once a year instead.This is a classic novel including everything from a fantasy world with pirates, fairies, and mermaids to flying and never growing up. It fits the definition of a fairy tale perfectly. It is a must have on every book shelf.
  • (5/5)
    So familiar is the tale of a boy who soars through the sky, propelled by happy thoughts and pixie dust, with a tireless spunk and refusal to grow up. However, only those who read the original Peter Pan will meet the ruthless, selfish fiend of a character who kills pirates and despises the thought of his mother. Barrie's Pan considers life itself to be an adventure and seamlessly jumps from one escapade to the next, often forgetting his accomplices and leaving them to fend for themselves! It is not until he and his Lost Boys of Neverland meet Wendy and her brothers, John and Michael, that he begins to understand the foreign concepts of care, responsibility, and a mother's love. In telling the story of Peter and Wendy, Barrie uses an eloquent, fantastical writing style. The reader consistently feels an air of magic and mischief as Barrie blends illustrative descriptions and sarcastic humor to bring to life imagination and creativity. Each of the seventeen chapters conveys a new tale and is written with the ideal length for a bedtime story. Given its early twentieth century origin, the text contains some language that may be unfamiliar to adolescent readers. The imagery, however, is so powerful that one lost sentence will not detract the reader from the message as a whole. Such a mystical atmosphere is amplified further in this 100th Anniversary Edition by Michael Hague’s vivid, full-page color illustrations interleaved throughout the novel. With Peter Pan, Barrie's own childlike tendencies and innocent writing style have come together to create a timeless children's hero and classic book for all ages.
  • (4/5)
    This classic tale is in its original format in this story, written by JM Barrie. It follows a magical boy, Peter Pan, and his adventures in Neverland as he refuses to grow up! Wendy, John and Michael soon join him for an adventure fighting pirates! This book would be good for middle school students, though it is slightly different (and more violent) than the Disney version.
  • (4/5)
    Most people are familiar with the basics of the story of Peter Pan. However familiar you may be, however, if you are a fan of juvenile literature this is one that you should read.It's not really that the storyline or adventures are that much different than what I knew of them or expected them to be, but to hear the story through J.M. Barrie's own words gives a slightly different tone and perspective to the tale that I was previously lacking. Barrie has a wonderful way with painting pictures with his phrases and a quirky sense of humor that comes through in the text.To be honest, I was a little put off by this quirkiness when I first started the story and during the first chapter was kind of wondering if it was going to be too odd for me. But, I stuck to it and was quickly rewarded as the story moved on and, it seemed, Barrie got carried on the winds to Neverland along with the children.A great adventure story and a classic for the ages that also has some keen insight into human behavior and the realities of growing up.A side note on this particular version: If you have access to the edition "illustrated" by Raquel Jaramillo, I would recommend reading it over a non-illustrated version. Her computer and art enhanced photos add an even more magical atmosphere to the story and are beautifully done.
  • (3/5)
    I was curious to read the original story of Peter Pan, since I only knew the Disney version of it. I can now say I like the book more than the movie.

    The story itself was enchanting. There was action, caricate situations and some heart-touching moments all in one. Peter was a child in every sense of the way. I'd say my favourite character here was Hook though, I found him more interesting and deep than the rest (maybe because he was an adult). I wouldn't mind if the characters were explored a bit more in this book.

    I read some reviews saying this version was rather dark, racist and sexist. I mostly disagree, specially about the dark part. In my opinion there was no description that might be unsuitable for children. It does has some sexism, and something that some people may call racism, but I didn't found it nowhere near as bad as some opinions I've heard made me expect.

    The only reason why I didn't give it 4 stars was because I felt like there was something missing. I don't know exactly what, but I'm sure it has to do with the fact that this is a story meant specially for children (and a marvelous one at that). But since I'm not a child anymore, I think the "style" of the story doesn't appeal to me as much as it used to, although it remains a great tale for every age.
  • (3/5)
    Well, that was racist. I'd been meaning to read this for a long time - and now I have finally done it! It's a little sadder than I expected. Barrie occasionally reminds you of the very sad parents. I'd rather that the time Wendy, John and Michael were gone for were a long time in their world, almost no time in reality. But I can't have everything the way I want it.
  • (2/5)
    Must read for boys and girls..
  • (5/5)
    Barrie's novel is worth a look if the Peter Pan you know is the highly adulterated flying boy of Disney fame. It's also worth a look if you've always considered Peter Pan to be a story aimed only at children. While the whimsy of Neverland and flying children does lend itself well to a "Children's Lit" tag, the comments of the story's narrator lends a subtext to the novel which should not be missed, and the roles being played by Pan, Wendy, and Hook are also worth looking at if you'd like to glean a deeper meaning from a "kiddie novel." What Barrie has done is create two beautifully separate realms, or snapshots, of childhood and adulthood, and he allows us to venture into and through them with Wendy and the Lost Boys. Definitely worth a read, for young and old. I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    This classic children's book by J.M. Barrie does not disappoint. Whimsical, light, and fun to read from cover to cover. I was actually a bit surprised to finally know that the Disney film version of "Peter Pan" is actually very close to the book -- definitely not the norm for Hollywood. All in all, a great read for children and those of us who never want to grow up. ;)
  • (3/5)
    This is ok, but really, see the play, which is both grander and sadder, or at least read the play.
  • (4/5)
    I adore books full of whimsy and charming turns of phrase on every page, so for the most part, I greatly enjoyed Peter Pan. I think the book hooked me when Barrie explained Neverland as an imaginary map visible to children until adult landmarks gradually overlap the map, leaving Neverland and its wonders forgotten. It’s such a beautiful cartographic metaphor for childhood, and from that point on, I was invested in Barrie’s ruminations on growing up and what children need (basically, they need moms), despite some boring parts and sexist qualms.

    As for the low points, and I recall this same criticism from my Disney watching days, the time spent in Neverland is not entertaining. I prefer the beginning and end, when the children are plotting their escape to and from Neverland, to the lagging doldrums in the middle of the book when the children are living in Neverland.

    I was also immensely annoyed by the book’s sexism. I understand that a major theme of the book is the necessity of mothers for young children, but because of this theme, to be a woman in Peter Pan, you must be either A) maternal B) desirous of male companionship (and thus jealous of other women). A combination of A and B is probably preferable (Wendy, who both mothers the Lost Boys and serves as a (chaste) female companion for Peter, is the closest to being an ideal woman).

    The book wears its sexism quite freely. The reason Wendy goes to Neverland is because she “tempts” Peter with her knowledge of bedtime stories. Oh, and the Lost Boys need their pockets darned. Later, Wendy only returns to Neverland to do Peter’s spring cleaning. It saddens me that only the little boys are depicted as having careless fun. Wendy’s brothers get to kill pirates and parade around the island, but Wendy is always a mother, always a caretaker. The other main female character is Tinkerbell, who is mute and terribly envious of Peter’s attention to Wendy. Also off-putting is the initial description of Tinkerbell as “a girl exquisitely gowned in a skeleton leaf, cut low and square, through which her figure could be seen to the best advantage.” Why do we need to see a tiny young girl’s body sexualized??? It’s disturbing how sexist this book is, but it seems to be largely ignored since it’s a children’s classic.

    I found it interesting that Peter, the eponymous character, is a horrible, selfish, obnoxious, cocky brat. Although he is the supposed hero of the story, Peter is described as domineering and heartless, as all young children often are. Wendy manages to overcome her sexist role and, in my opinion, is the real hero of the book. I wish the book still bore its original title, Peter and Wendy, because that more accurately represents the true protagonist and somewhat ameliorates the sexism.

    Yet, I still rated this book 4 stars in spite of those many caveats due to the final chapter, “When Wendy Grew Up,” which absolutely completes the book. The chapter is a tour de force on the bittersweet occurrences of growing up, yet it was absent in the original Peter Pan play. I’m glad it was added to the published novel because juxtaposing how Wendy grows up and is actually quite happy about it though occasionally nostalgic for Neverland, next to the immutable, everlasting boyhood of Peter, who will always be alone, is incredibly moving. Books concerned with growing up often depict the loss of childhood as the great loss of every individual’s life, the moment when we lose ourselves to a life of interminable monotony. But Barrie, in a children’s book no less, pioneers a different theme. In Peter Pan, he essentially shows us that we do not want to be like Peter Pan. For all the charms of childhood, adulthood is an equally exciting stage; perhaps there are no pirates or mermaids, but there are plenty of other adventures. We must simply grow up to discover them.
  • (4/5)
    While I am sure most children do not appreciate the humor of this great classic, as an adult I can't help but love it. From the images of a mother "tidying her children's minds" each night to the asides about grammar when writing, this is just a fun read. Yes, Peter is a jerk but he is loveable and you want to shake him as a mother does a obnoxious little boy.
  • (4/5)
    Though this is technically a children's book, the prose is charming and smart enough to entertain those much older. Barrie has an astounding way with words that snaps you right up and carries you along through the whole adventure. I would certainly read this again (and hope to share it with my children aloud someday), and I'd make a special effort to study the progression of the story--it seemed like the language "grew up" as the book went on. Could just be my perception though.
  • (4/5)
    I have always loved the story of Peter Pan, whether it was represented in book, play, movie. It took me an exceedingly long time before I read this book. I have a lot of classics to get through. I loved recognizing a line from a play or movie that I had heard before. The magic of this is astonishing and I look forward to sharing it with my children... although I will try to stress that they should not become little Peter's. :)