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Beezus and Ramona

Beezus and Ramona

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Beezus and Ramona

évaluations:
4/5 (100 évaluations)
Longueur:
130 pages
1 heure
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Oct 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780061972140
Format:
Livre

Description

Newbery Award winner Beverly Cleary delivers a humorous portrayal of the ups and downs of sisterhood. Both the younger and older siblings of the family will enjoy this book.

Having a little sister like four-year-old Ramona isn’t always easy for Beezus Quimby. With a wild imagination, disregard for order, and an appetite for chaos, Ramona makes it hard for Beezus to be the responsible older sister she knows she ought to be…especially when Ramona threatens to ruin Beezus’s birthday party. Will Beezus find the patience to handle her little sister before Ramona turns her big day into a complete disaster? 

"An important reminder of the good that can come when you throw yourself fully into any situation and draw outside the lines," says Brightly in their article "12 Girls from Fiction Who Are Their Own Heroes."

 

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Oct 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780061972140
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most beloved authors. As a child, she struggled with reading and writing. But by third grade, after spending much time in her public library in Portland, Oregon, she found her skills had greatly improved. Before long, her school librarian was saying that she should write children's books when she grew up. Instead she became a librarian. When a young boy asked her, "Where are the books about kids like us?" she remembered her teacher's encouragement and was inspired to write the books she'd longed to read but couldn't find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born! Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.

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Aperçu du livre

Beezus and Ramona - Beverly Cleary

PUBLISHER

1

BEEZUS AND HER LITTLE SISTER

Beatrice Quimby’s biggest problem was her little sister Ramona. Beatrice, or Beezus (as everyone called her, because that was what Ramona had called her when she first learned to talk), knew other nine-year-old girls who had little sisters who went to nursery school, but she did not know anyone with a little sister like Ramona.

Beezus felt that the biggest trouble with four-year-old Ramona was that she was just plain exasperating. If Ramona drank lemonade through a straw, she blew into the straw as hard as she could to see what would happen. If she played with her finger paints in the front yard, she wiped her hands on the neighbors’ cat. That was the exasperating sort of thing Ramona did. And then there was the way she behaved about her favorite book.

It all began one afternoon after school when Beezus was sitting in her father’s big chair embroidering a laughing teakettle on a pot holder for one of her aunts for Christmas. She was trying to embroider this one neatly, because she planned to give it to Aunt Beatrice, who was Mother’s younger sister and Beezus’s most special aunt.

With gray thread Beezus carefully outlined the steam coming from the teakettle’s spout and thought about her pretty young aunt, who was always so gay and so understanding. No wonder she was Mother’s favorite sister. Beezus hoped to be exactly like Aunt Beatrice when she grew up. She wanted to be a fourth-grade teacher and drive a yellow convertible and live in an apartment house with an elevator and a buzzer that opened the front door. Because she was named after Aunt Beatrice, Beezus felt she might be like her in other ways, too.

While Beezus was sewing, Ramona, holding a mouth organ in her teeth, was riding around the living room on her tricycle. Since she needed both hands to steer the tricycle, she could blow in and out on only one note. This made the harmonica sound as if it were groaning oh dear, oh dear over and over again.

Beezus tried to pay no attention. She tied a small knot in the end of a piece of red thread to embroider the teakettle’s laughing mouth. Conceal a knot as you would a secret, Grandmother always said.

Inhaling and exhaling into her mouth organ, Ramona closed her eyes and tried to pedal around the coffee table without looking.

Ramona! cried Beezus. Watch where you’re going!

When Ramona crashed into the coffee table, she opened her eyes again. Oh dear, oh dear, moaned the harmonica. Around and around pedaled Ramona, inhaling and exhaling.

Beezus looked up from her pot holder. Ramona, why don’t you play with Bendix for a while? Bendix was Ramona’s favorite doll. Ramona thought Bendix was the most beautiful name in the world.

Ramona took the harmonica out of her mouth. No, she said. Read my Scoopy book to me.

Oh, Ramona, not Scoopy, protested Beezus. We’ve read Scoopy so many times.

Instead of answering, Ramona put her harmonica between her teeth again and pedaled around the room, inhaling and exhaling. Beezus had to lift her feet every time Ramona rode by.

The knot in Beezus’s thread pulled through the material of her pot holder, and she gave up trying to conceal it as she would a secret and tied a bigger knot. Finally, tired of trying to keep her feet out of Ramona’s way, she put down her embroidery. All right, Ramona, she said. If I read about Scoopy, will you stop riding your tricycle around the living room and making so much noise?

Yes, said Ramona, and climbed off her tricycle. She ran into the bedroom she shared with Beezus and returned with a battered, dog-eared, sticky book, which she handed to Beezus. Then she climbed into the big chair beside Beezus and waited expectantly.

Reflecting that Ramona always managed to get her own way, Beezus gingerly took the book and looked at it with a feeling of great dislike. It was called The Littlest Steam Shovel. On the cover was a picture of a steam shovel with big tears coming out of its eyes. How could a steam shovel have eyes, Beezus thought and, scarcely looking at the words, began for what seemed like the hundredth or maybe the thousandth time, Once there was a little steam shovel named Scoopy. One day Scoopy said, ‘I do not want to be a steam shovel. I want to be a bulldozer.’

You skipped, interrupted Ramona.

No, I didn’t, said Beezus.

Yes, you did, insisted Ramona. "You’re supposed to say, ‘I want to be a big bulldozer.’"

Oh, all right, said Beezus crossly. ‘I want to be a big bulldozer.’

Ramona smiled contentedly and Beezus continued reading. ‘G-r-r-r,’ said Scoopy, doing his best to sound like a bulldozer.

Beezus read on through Scoopy’s failure to be a bulldozer. She read about Scoopy’s wanting to be a trolley bus (Beep-beep, honked Ramona), a locomotive (A-hooey, a-hooey, wailed Ramona), and a pile driver (Clunk! Clunk! shouted Ramona). Beezus was glad when she finally reached the end of the story and Scoopy learned it was best for little steam shovels to be steam shovels. There! she said with relief, and closed the book. She always felt foolish trying to make noises like machinery.

Clunk! Clunk! yelled Ramona, jumping down from the chair. She pulled her harmonica out of the pocket of her overalls and climbed on her tricycle. Oh dear, oh dear, she inhaled and exhaled.

Ramona! cried Beezus. You promised you’d stop if I read Scoopy to you.

I did stop, said Ramona, when she had taken the harmonica out of her mouth. Now read it again.

Ramona Geraldine Quimby! Beezus began, and stopped. It was useless to argue with Ramona. She wouldn’t pay any attention. Why do you like that story anyway? Beezus asked. Steam shovels can’t talk, and I feel silly trying to make all those noises.

"I don’t, said Ramona, and wailed, A-hooey, a-hooey," with great feeling before she put her harmonica back in her mouth.

Beezus watched her little sister pedal furiously around the living room, inhaling and exhaling. Why did she have to like a book about a steam shovel anyway? Girls weren’t supposed to like machinery. Why couldn’t she like something quiet, like Peter Rabbit?

Mother, who had bought The Littlest Steam Shovel at the supermarket to keep Ramona quiet while she shopped one afternoon, was so tired of Scoopy that she always managed to be too busy to read to Ramona. Father came right out and said he was fed up with frustrated steam shovels and he would not read that book to Ramona and, furthermore, no one else was to read it to her while he was in the house. And that was that.

So only Beezus was left to read Scoopy to Ramona. Plainly something had to be done and it was up to Beezus to do it. But what? Arguing with Ramona was a waste of time. So was appealing to her better nature. The best thing to do with Ramona, Beezus had learned, was to think up something to take the place of whatever her mind was fixed upon. And what could take the place of The Littlest Steam Shovel? Another book, of course, a better book, and the place to find it

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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    So much fun; I know lots of kids can relate to these two!
  • (2/5)
    I think the writing in this book is seriously outdated. I read these books when I was younger, but I found that I didn't really have any memory of whether or not I thought they were any good. I think the reason I had a lack of memory is because this book is simply not memorable. There are so moments that are fun but overall this book isn't anything special. I think Beverly Cleary has other books that a so much better.
  • (4/5)
    This first book of the Ramona series is told from the exasperated point of view of Ramona's older sister, Beatrice (or "Beezus" as Ramona calls her). Ramona is an energetic and imaginative four year old who does not want to listen to anyone, but especially not her nine year old sister. While I cannot recall being four, I have seen children of that age act in a similar manner to Ramona's, and I found myself chuckling over not only her antics, but her "logic", as only the logic of a four year old can be!Highly entertaining!
  • (4/5)
    I enjoy mist books that Cleary wrote, but Ramona is always my favorite. Her blend of outrageous imagination and mischievousness is a winning combination that creates fun stories. In this, the first of the Ramona series, the central character is actually Beezus, Ramona's older sister. She is already in elementary school. and quite mature; at least, she believes she is. Even though Ramona is her sister, and they have some nice moments together, Beezus can't help wishing that Ramona would act more like other girls' little sisters.Especially when Ramona pulls stunts like inviting all the kids her age to her house one rainy afternoon, without telling her mom, just because she wants to have a party. Or when she writes her name on every page in the library book, after her dad tells her that she will have to return it and she doesn't want to. Beezus thinks that Ramona always gets her way. She is a little jealous of her younger sibling, too. Ramona has a wonderful imagination and cute face, which everyone seems to notice, while overlooking Beezus. The worst moment, however, is when Ramona ruins Beezus's very special birthday. Beezus realizes that at that moment she doesn't love her sister at all, and then feels terribly guilty, for only a horrible girl would feel that way. Luckily, her mom and her Aunt Beatrice convince Beezus to share her feelings. They teach Beezus that family relationships are complicated, and we don't always feel in love with those closest to us.The book balances sweet and silly. Each chapter features a new adventure that the two sisters share, and they are engaging and truly capture a child's world. While Ramona is a source of laughter, the book stays firmly with Beezus's perspective. She is the straight woman to Ramona's eccentricities. I empathized with Beezus, with her conflicting feelings towards Ramona, and her role as the big sister.Their relationship felt real, while still being very funny. The larger ideas in the book are brought to a nice conclusion in the final chapter. This story will entertain children while teaching valuable life lessons, and is well written with strong characters and a great sense of humor. Don't overlook this classic of children's literature.
  • (3/5)
    This book is about Beezus, Ramona's older sister, who dislike having to change her life because of Ramona (during her birthday, at home, in the library, talking with neighbors). At the end, Beezus learn to love Ramona, but it was a hard task for her.This is a very nice book to teach about family and friendship. Students will learn about getting to know and respect each other by what they really are.Reading Journal: count as 1 Early Chapter Book
  • (3/5)
    I picked this up at the library before I heard anything about the movie because I happened to be on a Bevery Cleary reading spree. This is not the edition I read, but I had to pick it here. Because. There are new illustrations. WTH? There are new pictures and Beezuz and Ramona don't look right. It pissed me off so I didn't really enjoy this as much as I thought I would. It's hard not to enjoy a book with an imaginary lizard in it though.
  • (4/5)
    I don't review every book I read--some small tomes I'll just run through to kill time, or sate my curiosity, and then never give them a second thought. This was going to be one of those books, until I laughed out loud. What had happened was that I was killing time in my daughter's second grade classroom. (She's a teacher, by the way, not a student.) I noticed this book in the classroom library, and since I had fond memories of reading Ramona the Pest when I was a kid, I figured I'd read a bit of this instead of the book I had in my backpack. Anyway, Beezus and Ramona is about Beezus Quimby, a nine year old girl in 1950s Oregon, and the troubles she has with her four year old sister Ramona. At first I enjoyed reading a book written in the 1950s--a different world in many ways. Soon enough, my enjoyment was garnished with chuckles over Ramona's antics. She is the chaos bringer, the one who manages to see and act in the world in a way that is different from the average person and who is quite disconcerting to those, like Beezus, who expect a certain order to their lives. Anyway, a few chapters in I got to the laugh out loud joke--an incident which revealed to me that not only is Ms. Cleary able to write about crazy shenanigans, but she has a clever wit in her tool kit as well. So from that point, I knew that I wanted to finish reading the book (easily done) and tell you all to check it out.--J.
  • (5/5)
    Great book series about two sisters and how they try to get along. The continuation of the books about Ramona who now has a younger sibling. This book is hilarious, and all the antics of Beezus are so adorable. I recommend this for young and beginner readers.
  • (4/5)
    Beezus Quimby thinks that her little sister, Ramona, is a big nuisance. Whether she's riding a tricycle through the living room, blowing bubbles in her lemonade or finger painting on the family cat, Ramona finds a way to exasperate her sister. Nine-year-old Beezus decides to stop embroidering a potholder for her Aunt Beatrice so she can read to Ramona, hoping to quiet her down.The plan backfires when Ramona chooses a book about a steam shovel and insists on making noisy sound effects as Beezus reads. Finally Beezus offers to walk with Ramona to the library so she can choose a different book. Ramona embarrasses her sister by wearing a pair of paper bunny ears and showing a neighbor the scabs on her knees. Instead of accepting the books Beezus suggests, Ramona chooses another book about a steam shovel, annoying her sister once again.
  • (2/5)
    I know I read some of the Ramona books as a child but I don't have particularly strong memories of them, so listening to the audiobook was an interesting experience. Stockard Channing narrates this Listening Library edition and I was disappointed with the results. I really enjoy Channing's film and tv work, but the narration just didn't work for me. Her children's voices were either whiny or outright obnoxious which makes it hard for me to decide how much of my dislike of Ramona was the writing and how much was the narration. I had always remembered Ramona as being high-spirited and mischievous, but she's out and out badly behaved here, definitely a brat. I just recently read a comment from someone that they aimed to be a parent like one of the Quimbys and after listening to this, I found that amazing. Ramona is allowed to behave terribly and wiggle out of consequences through much of the book and what finally causes her parents to quite firmly put their feet down is when she mixes jelly with her mashed potatoes - a very minor thing compared to the temper tantrums, wastefulness of the apples episode, or the destruction of a library book. There are also some things that I think date the book significantly. The whole concept that Beezus and Ramona walk themselves to the library, or that four-year-old Ramona is expected to play by herself in the sandbox with no supervision while Beezus is in art class, even the embroidering of the pot holders for Aunt Beatrice all set this in a time that will be unfamiliar to kids now. I wonder if I would have liked this more with a different narrator or reading it in standard book format and I'm certainly interested in reading at least one more to see if they're more like what I half-remember. Also, the whole bathroom/hair washing thing is completely foreign to me - apparently the Quimbys only have one bathroom (not unusual) but they wash their hair in the sink which indicates to me that they don't have a bathtub or shower at all (this is what is unfamiliar to me). Also apparently they don't do it that often since it's made into a rather large event in the course of the story. That's just a very different dynamic from how I've been lucky to be able to live and it gave me food for thought.
  • (4/5)
    Beezus doesn't always love Ramona. She tends to cause trouble wherever she goes - whether it is in the living room causing a ruckus on her tricycle, or out in public where Beezus has to quickly fix the situation. The trouble is, Beezus feels like she should love Ramona...does she have to? A fun story about being a big sister an all the joys (and not joys) of having a precocious little sister.
  • (4/5)
    Another one of my favorite book series - you can't stay mad or stay away from Ramona Quimby for very long.
  • (5/5)
    I read this with my daughter - we're ready for the movie.
    She's anxious to read more Ramona! YEA!
  • (3/5)
    I can't believe Cleary wrote a whole series about this obnoxious child. Now I know where the Real Housewives of New Jersey came from.
  • (4/5)
    A simply marvelous series that is only finally beginning to be dated just a tiny bit. Will always be worthy, though.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first in Cleary's series of Ramona books.  I listened to it with my daughter at bedtimes.  In many ways my four-year old daughter IS Ramona Quimby, creative and mischief and sometimes seems indifferent to the chaos she causes.  So this is a very true to life book, and it feels oddly contemporary despite being published in 1955.  Unlike later books, this story is told from the point of view of Beezus who has to deal with a little sister who wants to hear an annoying book about steam shovel, colors in her library book, looks her friend's dog in the bathroom, invites neighborhood children to a party that no one else in the family knew about, and destroys not one but two of Beezus' birthday cakes.  Beezus has to deal with the guilt that sometimes she doesn't love Ramona.  Near the end of the book <spoiler alert> Beezus mother and Aunt Beatrice reminisce about having a similarly contentious relationship as children but are able to laugh about it as adults, giving Beezus some comfort.  It's a pretty brilliant book and I'm glad I'm getting to hear it now having missed it as a child.Favorite Passages:I am too a Merry Sunshine!
  • (5/5)
    My little one and I have been thoroughly enjoying this series for bedtime reading. (My daughter refers to this sisterly duo as "Beezus and Fermona" lol.) Reading them is a fun nostalgia trip for me, recalling not only the days when I read them as a child, but also the days when children had a lot more freedom than they do today.
  • (4/5)
    As a kid, I used to devour Beverly Cleary books and the Ramona series was no exception! I recently found a copy of Beezus and Ramona at the local used bookstore, and I picked it up to relive a bit of my childhood. As a child, I was drawn to the zest for life that Ramona brought to the page. However, on this go around, I found myself identifying with sweet, lovable Beezus. Her intelligent and quiet demeanor is such a contrast to that of Ramona's. I now have a younger sister and she is a lot like Ramona, so I can definitely see why Beezus gets so exasperated with her so often. This is a timeless story about the differences between sisters and the love that they share even when they don't like each other. This book, while heavily featuring Ramona, is more about Beezus and is told from her point of view. I'd recommend this book to young girls who have sisters that they feel like they just can't stand. It's relatable and timeless. Even though this book is over 50 years old (can you believe it!), it stands up to the test of time and is a standout volume of children's literature.
  • (4/5)
    5starPAges 8 to 114-year-old spunky Ramona drives her older sister crazy with silly antics such as playing Gretel by putting her baby doll's head in the oven while Beezus's birthday cake is cooking, inviting kids over for a birthday party without letting her mom know, and "writing" her name in every page of a library book because she wanted to own it. First of the Ramona books."Beezus felt that the biggest trouble with four-year-old Ramona was that she was just plain exasperating. If Ramona drank lemonade through a straw, she blew into the straw as hard as she could to see what would happen. If she played with her finger paints in the front yard, she wiped her hands on the neighbors' cat. That was the exasperating sort of thing Ramona did. And then there was the way she behaved about her favorite book."
  • (5/5)
    4P"I feel so mixed up, thought Beezus. Sometimes I don't like Ramona at all, and I'm supposed to like her because she's my sister, and . . . Oh, dear, even if she's little, can't she ever be more like other people's sisters?" p33This is not a radical change book.
  • (4/5)
    Part D PopularCleary, B. (1955). Beezus and Ramona. New York: Harper Festival.Of course she has to love her sister, but sometimes Beezus doesn’t. No one else seems to have a little sister like Ramona, a sister that always ruins everything and always gets her way. When Ramona insists on keeping a library book, she writes her name on every single page. Since she has ruined it, Beezus has to pay for the damage. Seeing her mom and her Aunt Beatrice have such a great sisterly relationship, Beezus worries that she is not very nice since there are times that she doesn’t like her sister. She finally learns that even her mom and aunt sometimes didn’t like each other when they were growing up. Readers are sure to laugh and sympathize with Beezus as her sister Ramona stirs up situation after situation. Beezus tries to be patient and understanding, but sometimes life with a pesky little sister is not always easy. The illustrations throughout the book add to the humorous, yet realistic, ways of life with a sister like Ramona. Ages 7-10.
  • (5/5)
    In this fine example of an eBook, Beezus experiences a range of annoying behaviours from her little sister Ramona, as per usual. From a ruined library book to an incident resulting in a ton of apple sauce to an unexpected party and two spoiled birthday cakes, one involving a hilariously melted rubber doll, Beezus just isn’t all that sure she likes her sister very much. This early chapter book by renowned American author Beverly Cleary is a very good example of sibling rivalry and provides a great lesson about how even though we might not always love our siblings, there’s always the chance that we’ll grow up to be the best of friends. The eBook format was easy to read and allowed the detail of the illustrations to enhance the story. I especially liked using Adobe Digital Editions software to read the eBook and will continue to use this program until such time as I see fit to invest in another digital reader (Kindle possibly?).
  • (5/5)
    Library Thing Part D # 4 Realistic Fiction PopularCleary, Beverly, and Tracy Dockray. Beezus and Ramona. New York, NY: HarperFestival, 2010. Print. Even though Beezus and Ramona was published in 1955 about fifty-five years ago, it is still a simple relaxing and entertaining read. The reader, somewhat like the invisible Ralph, is being pulled by Ramona and watching everything she and her sister see, think, and experience. We understand Beezus inadequate feelings about her art work. She lacks imagination and here her little sister has an overwhelming abundance of imagination. The reader sits on a stool and mixes colors with Ramona and can even taste that lollipop she expertly confiscates for a quick few licks and battled Wayne in a one two three encounter. But all the commotion and anger has left Beezus with an ingenious threat for Ramona, if she doesn’t leave the art room and play in the sand box…Beezus would tickle her. Once Ramona is out the door, Beezus begins her imaginative drawing with renewed confidence. The characters are very believable and the sibling rivalry unfolds here and there but all the time both sisters do enjoy each other’s company and Beezus is protective and proud of being an older sister. I think the only scene that would date this story would be the embroidery project Beezus is sewing. It would be nice if that art could make a comeback with today’s girls. Curriculum connection is language arts elementary grades.
  • (4/5)
    Nine year old Beezus has a four year old sister named Ramona who drives her crazy. Beezus cannot enjoy anything on her own because Ramona wants to tag along and always ruins everything. She throws temper tantrums, doesn't listen or do what she is told and-- worst of all-- is cute and clever and full of imagination. It seems to Beezus that in the end, Ramona always gets her way. It is so unfair! AAAAh-- an older but goodie--the original was written in 1955 and some details are a little dated-- the theme sounds like something from shakespeare! Cleary is the master once again with this classic tale of sibling rivalry and the subtlety of family relations. This is the only Huggins/Quimby story told from big sister Beezus' point of view and as a big sister myself, i can sympathize. The littler ones are always cuter and there's no glory in keeping an eye on your little sister. (of course, Ramona thinks her sister gets to do everything!) This is a quiet tale the unwraps slowley-- Beezus takes her sister to the library where Ramona insists that the book she borrowed is hers. Ramona writes her name on every page to prove it is hers and Ramona has to pay for it. The sisters are very different-- Beezus the thoughtful and responsible older sister while Ramona is the carefree one full of bad behavior and imagination-- personality traits that are mirrored in the mother and aunt---something the reader does not fully realize until the birthday party at the end. A classic, gentle tale from a master storyteller.
  • (5/5)
    Four year old Ramona is always messing stuff up and driving her nine year old big sister Beezus crazy. This book was published in 1955 and has stood the test of time. I remember reading Ramona books when I was little and loving them so I was thrilled when Cash wanted to read this book. He loved it. He can relate to Beezus because he has a four year old little brother who can be pretty ornery just like Ramona. I can relate to Ramona’s mother feeling exasperated and not knowing what to do with her at times! This was a really fun book to read together – Cash was literally laughing out loud. In addition to being entertaining, this book has a very nice message about how it’s okay to not always feel loving toward your younger sibling when they are driving you crazy and offers hope for the older sibling that things will get better as the younger sibling gets older. I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    This is about a girl named Ramona and how she is has a very creative imagination. Her older sister Beezus gets annoyed with her sometimes but they love each other. I recommend teachers to read this book to their students because it will help their students learn about how to act with teachers, parents, and siblings.
  • (5/5)
    Another childhood book, this one thankfully stood the test of time. I seem to recall loving it as a kid because I was the eldest of 3 and would occasionally get frustrated by disruptive younger siblings. Only occasionally though,nowhere to the level that Beezus/Beatric has to deal with with the rambunctious Ramona. Ramona's logic is usually sound, if simplistic, for example when she gets a library book that she loves, she makes it 'hers' by writing her impression of her name in it. Beezus gets money to pay for the damage, but the librarian says that she has to cover the cost of the whole book, so they get to take it home, but it's Beezus's (since it was checked out on her card) and she's much more willing to read it to her sister on her own terms. It gives good messages in simplistic but not condescending language, and each chapter is pretty much a stand alone episode.
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book for many reasons. I liked the unique names that the characters have. For example the two main characters, Beezus and Ramona have uncommon names. This teaches readers that it is normal to have unique names and to be proud of your name and identity. I also liked how the author included illustrations on a few pages. The illustrations relate to the text and support the reader’s understanding of the plot. I liked how some chapters end in a question. For example, “But what on earth will Mother ever do with all that applesauce?” The author asks these questions to get the reader predicting what will happen in the next chapter. The big idea of the story is to love your family even if you have your differences.
  • (5/5)
    The tale of two siblings who endure the trials and tribulations of childhood. I would use this in the classroom when learning about families, siblings, and how to handle our actions. I would have students draw their own families and tell their how family story.
  • (3/5)
    The best way I can describe my thoughts about this book is that it is simply okay. I really like the depth of the characters and how they grow throughout the book, especially Ramona and Beezus. I also love the dialogue throughout the book, I think that it is believable and sounds genuine. While this story is fun, a lot of the discipline tactics of the parents seem very antiquated. Often in the book, Ramona is told to do things because that is just the way it is A repeated theme throughout the book is that Ramona will grow out of her "exasperating" behavior as the mother and Aunt Beatrice did. However, I do not think that losing one's childlike fascination with the world and the questioning, curiosity and creativity that comes with it is something that should be glorified to kids. I think that encouraging Ramona to keep her eclectic creativity should be included in the book, not the attitude of tolerating it until it is outgrown.