• book
    0% of The Philosophy of Existentialism completed

From the Publisher

A collection of essays by Jean-Paul Sartre that touch upon the subject of existentialism by looking at aesthetics, emotions, writing, phenomenology, and perception The Philosophy of Existentialism collects representative essays on Jean-Paul Sartre’s pioneering subject: existentialism. Beginning with a thoughtful introduction by fellow French philosopher Jean Wahl, this work looks at existentialism through several lenses, exploring topics such as the emotions, imagination, nothingness, freedom, responsibility, and the desire to be God.   By providing exposition on a variety of subjects, The Philosophy of Existentialism is a valuable introduction to Sartre’s ideas.  

Topics: Existentialism, Informative, Existentialism, Translated, France, Essays, and Anthology

Published: Philosophical Library Open Road an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781453228814
List price: $14.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Philosophy of Existentialism: Selected Essays
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Aeon Magazine
5 min read

How Camus and Sartre Split up Over the Question of How to Be Free

They were an odd pair. Albert Camus was French Algerian, a pied-noir born into poverty who effortlessly charmed with his Bogart-esque features. Jean-Paul Sartre, from the upper reaches of French society, was never mistaken for a handsome man. They met in Paris during the Occupation and grew closer after the Second World War. In those days, when the lights of the city were slowly turning back on, Camus was Sartre’s closest friend. ‘How we loved you then,’ Sartre later wrote. They were gleaming icons of the era. Newspapers reported on their daily movements: Sartre holed up at Les Deux Magots, Ca
Nautilus
4 min read
Science

Angst and the Empty Set: We Can Experience Nothingness, but Does It Actually Exist?: We can experience nothingness, but does it actually exist?

Suppose you open your handbag one day expecting to find your wallet there, but don’t. Do you literally see the absence of your wallet in your handbag? If you do, it means something important: Absences have a positive presence in your perception that you can grasp, independently from all ordinary things. Anna Farennikova, a philosopher at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has argued exactly this position. The phenomenology of the experience of seeing something missing, she says, has “immediate, perceptual qualities” that encourage us to see absences as being as fundamental as pr
Aeon Magazine
4 min read

Simone de Beauvoir’s Political Philosophy Resonates Today

Simone de Beauvoir is rightly best known for declaring: ‘One is not born, but rather becomes, woman.’ A less well-known facet of her philosophy, particularly relevant today, is her political activism, a viewpoint that follows directly from her metaphysical stance on the self, namely that we have no fixed essences. The existential maxim ‘existence precedes essence’ underpins de Beauvoir’s philosophy. For her, as for Jean-Paul Sartre, we are first thrown into the world and then create our being through our actions. While there are facts of our existence that we can’t choose, such as being born,