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Histoire de Pierre Lapin

Histoire de Pierre Lapin

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Histoire de Pierre Lapin

évaluations:
4/5 (1,077 évaluations)
Longueur:
53 pages
15 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1931
Format:
Livre

Sortie:
Jan 1, 1931
Format:
Livre

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Histoire de Pierre Lapin - Victorine Ballon

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Histoire de Pierre Lapin, by Beatrix Potter

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with

almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or

re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included

with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: Histoire de Pierre Lapin

Author: Beatrix Potter

Translator: Victorine Ballon

Julienne Profichet

Release Date: June 6, 2009 [EBook #29052]

Language: French

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HISTOIRE DE PIERRE LAPIN ***

Produced by David Edwards and the Online Distributed

Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was

produced from images generously made available by The

Internet Archive)

PIERRE LAPIN

Image plus grande

PAR

BEATRIX POTTER

F. WARNE & C

o.

L

td.

Image plus grande

HISTOIRE DE PIERRE LAPIN

Image plus grande

HISTOIRE DE

PIERRE LAPIN

PAR

BEATRIX POTTER

TRADUIT DE L’ANGLAIS PAR

VICTORINE BALLON

& JULIENNE PROFICHET

LONDON

FREDERICK WARNE & CO., Ltd.

AND NEW YORK

[All rights reserved]

Printed in Great Britain

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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    I'm reading the excellent biography "The Tale of Beatrix Potter" and that has brought me back to her beautiful, and extraordinary children's books. I don't know when I first read this, but given the childish printing of my name inside the front cover I'd say I was five years old. Peter Rabbit has stayed with me for half a century now and this simple tale of the adventures of a naughty rabbit in a vegetable garden will never grow old. (On a side note, when we are walking a family dog and someone needs to shoo away a cat or a bird, that might attract unwanted attention from the dog, we call it "doing a Mr McGregor").
  • (4/5)
    I remember reading Peter Rabbit as a child, so its nostalgic for me. I liked the illustrations for the books as well. They were warm, colorful, and made me feel at home.
  • (4/5)
    The classic tale illustrated with Potter's illustrations. Mother knows best!
  • (5/5)
    The Tale of Peter Rabbit (Xist Illustrated Children's Classics) Classic tale of Peter Rabbit and his bunny family. He wants what is in the farmer's gardenalthough his mother has warned him never to go near it. He can not resist and he gets caught....Great photos and story.
  • (5/5)
    This is a really good children book the pictures are beautiful and the story has a good, if somewhat stong, lesson in it. I believe children will love this book.
  • (5/5)
    The tale of a curious and naughty bunny; complete with adventure, loss, danger, friendly helpers, a near escape, a resigned mother, and a moral ending. You don't get the berries and cream when you misbehave, only chamomile tea for naughty bunnies.This is all stated without judgement on the author's part, nor are there any lectures. Just a sweet story with lovely illustrations. This particular book was given me by my grandmother, Charlotte, when I was two years old. It has always been a favorite of mine.
  • (3/5)
    I kind of don't know why this is a big deal--it's a cute enough story, but are we really supposed to be riveted by how "naughty" Peter is and how he's stepping out of rabbit-nursery into rabbit-Ypres? We're not Edwardians anymore.
  • (3/5)
    This is a short story to teach a lesson to children. I suggest it be told to young children.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this one a lot more than I was expecting to, and so did my little boy. He gasped as he saw Peter sneaking into Mr. McGregor's garden, and looked at me with fright: "But, he'll be made into pie!?" A simple little story, full of action and delight, the pictures so lovely, and just the right length for bedtime reading.
  • (3/5)
    Not too much to it without the illustrations. The Raggedy Ann stories were better. They stood up well even without the illustrations.
  • (5/5)
    Great book for children ( and grown-ups!) with fabulous pictures.
  • (5/5)
    This is the story of a family of rabbits. After the mother has warned her son Peter not to go into the vegetable garden, he disobeys her and does. Students will love reading this classic novel and learning what happens next.
  • (3/5)
    The Tale of Peter Rabbit is the quintessential cautionary tale, warning children about the grave consequences of misbehaving. This was my first reading of the book and I can't shake the feeling that Peter is really caught by Mr McGregor, and that the second half of the book is a mere dream sequence of being skinned and made into a pie. I don't have any evidence to back me up other than I found the story of Peter's father foreshadowing.
  • (4/5)
    The Tale of Peter Rabbit is a story about four little rabbits who lived with their Mother. Mother left the children to go to the baker's and told them not to get into mischief, and especially don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden. Peter Rabbit's siblings went down the lane to gather blackberries, but Peter went straight for Mr. McGregor's garden. He ate lettuce, french beans, radishes and when he was looking for some parsley, he ran into Mr. McGregor! Mr. McGregor chased Peter and Peter got trapped in gooseberry net. Some friendly sparrows helped Peter out of the net and he wandered around the garden trying to find his way out. Peter eventually found his way out and ran all the way home without looking back, but he had lost all of his clothes.This story shows that there can be consequences to your actions and that you should follow the rules. Each student could re-create their favorite scene from this book by drawing it out and write one sentence explaining why they chose that scene.
  • (5/5)
    The Tale of Peter Rabbit is a fantastic tale of a little rabbit who gets himself into a sticky situation after not listening to his mother. As the story was written years ago in England, the language may feel somewhat unfamiliar to children. However this provides an amazing enrichment opportunity to explore new vocabulary such as currant, implored, wriggled, and fortnight. The illustrations are not only beautifully rendered at “rabbit height”, they help children understand the meaning of the story and imagine it like a movie in their head. Overall, this is a fantastic story that will remain a classic for generations to come. After all, we all need to learn to listen to our parents.
  • (5/5)
    Potter, B. (1902). The tale of Peter Rabbit. New York: Warne. This classic tale by Beatrix Potter recounts the misadventures of Peter, a disobeying little rabbit who gets himself in trouble by going to Mr. McGregor’s garden to eat the delicious veggies found there. However, things do not go well for Peter as he starts getting sick to his stomach, and then almost gets caught by Mr. McGregor. In the end, disobedient Peter has chamomile tea for dinner while his siblings enjoy a good dinner. I especially like the illustrations by Beatrix Potter that face each accompanying section of text. I find them very endearing, and they definitely contribute to the understanding of the story as they feature all the major points in it. As B. Potter wanted it, this book is meant to be held by little hands, hence its small format. It is a unique book as it has endured through more than one century, and is still enjoyed and beloved by children today (along with other B. Potter’s stories).Ages 3 to 8 (will work well as a read-aloud for ages 3-6). Another book written in the same decade (same year, in this case): Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling (1902).
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful story. Read it again when I was in You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown. Such a sweet story.
  • (5/5)
    Even 112 years after it was first published this book remains a beloved children's book. I have fond memories of my mom reading this book to me and later reading this book myself. Peter Rabbit is different than his siblings Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton-tail. They were happy to gather blueberries, but Peter’s curiosity leads him to Mr McGregor’s garden where he was told not to go by his Mum. He ignores his mother’s warning and goes anyway. Even today children can relate to the character Peter Rabit. The off limits is always irresistible to kids. The plot is simple which makes it easy for children to follow. The story contains a valuable lesson about the consequences of disobedience and the importance of listening to your parents.
  • (3/5)
    In my opinion this is a good book. The story is about Peter Rabbit, who is very mischievous and breaks the rules that his mother gives. Peter finds himself in trouble and finds many different ways to escape. I liked how the plot of this story was very strong. For instance, there is a clear beginning, middle, and end of the story, including a conflict. The end of the story solves the problem, but a lesson is still learned. At the end, he does get home safely, but he misses out on supper with his siblings. Another thing that I liked about this story was the character of Peter Rabbit. This story shows a character misbehaving and not doing what they were told and in a result they almost deal with consequences that could arise. I think that it is easy for children to relate to Peter Rabbit and the author did a very good job of developing this character into someone that children can read about and believe. Overall, the message of the story is the idea of disobedience. Peter Rabbit does not listen to his mother, which is a lesson for children to learn that “parents know best.” Children can see how breaking the rules can result in many difficult consequences.
  • (4/5)
    Summary- Peter Rabbit, being the honoree bunny he is, does not listen to his mothers warning about keeping away from Mr. McGregor’s garden. Peter goes into the garden to get so berries for him and three siblings. While in the garden, Mr. McGregor finds Peter. Peter finds himself in a lot of danger, while he tries to escape from the angry Mr. McGregor. Peter end up escaping but lost his clothing on the way. He returns home feeling very sick. His sibling and mother get to snack on the nice treat he risked so much to get. Personal Reaction - I really like this book. It is a cute story for kids and it teaches kids a lesson about listening to their parents. The main lesson of this book is about the consequences of dissections. The books good, but the lesion it teaches is the best part.Classroom Extensions 1.“Mr. McGregor’s Garden” Have the student assist you in making a classroom garden. Plant things such radishes, peas, and other thing you would typically find in the garden. Have a daily watering chart to have the kids get involved with the garden2. “ Peter Rabbit and his Family”- Do a small unit over rabbits. Teach about what they eat, where they live, what different kinds of rabbits there are and things along this line. At the end of the unit, ( if you are a loud) bring a live bunny into the classroom.
  • (5/5)
    What's better than Peter Rabbit in French? I bought this little book long ago and I don't remember exactly where or when but it is adorable. 
  • (5/5)
    Summary: Peter Rabbit and his siblings are told by their mother to go and play, but to stay away from Mr. McGregor’s garden. Peter doesn’t listen to his mother and goes to the garden to eat. Mr. McGregor sees him and chases him throughout the garden. Peter eventually escapes, but not before losing his jacket and shoes. When he arrives home, he is exhausted and not feeling well. His mother puts him to bed, while his siblings get to eat blackberries. Personal Reaction: The Tale of Peter Rabbit has always been one of my favorite stories. I love the description of all of the mischief peter gets into, and the ways he has to hide from Mr. McGregor. Even though the illustrations are on the smaller side, I think that the suspense of whether or not Peter will escape is enough to hold the attention of even young children. The illustrations that are present are traditional, not modern with bright colors, but are beautiful. Extension Ideas: This would be a great book to use in a gardening unit. Students could help to construct a barrier (to keep Peter out!) around a class garden. You could incorporate math skills in measuring out the pieces used to build the barrier. You could also have each student create a scarecrow like Mr. McGregor did out of Peter’s jacket to put in the garden.
  • (5/5)
    This book can be used for cause and effect because when Peter Rabbit ate the vegetables he got in trouble by his mom for disobeying. This could also teach students to about obedience.
  • (5/5)
    Another classic tale about a little rabbit name peter who learns a lesson the hard way. Certainly a must read!
  • (4/5)
    A cute story of a rabbit who takes chances in his quest for food. A good book to use when teaching about plot and sequencing. Also can be used to teach cause and effect.
  • (5/5)
    Queste storie di Beatrix Potter sono piccoli gioielli per la letteratura infantile.
    Il racconto ha un chiaro fine morale: i bambini ubbidienti alla fine hanno dei vantaggi rispetto ai disubbidienti (che se poi uno applica questa morale all'Italia la cosa non torna così bene), però, morale a parte, ci sono le illustrazioni.
    Ecco, questi disegni dell'autrice stessa sono veramente belli e delicati; le illustrazioni fatte dallo stesso autore difficilmente disattendono le mie aspettative, anzi arricchiscono la storia fornendone un ulteriore punto di vista.

    ---

    Beatrix Potter created various extraordinary children stories.
    This story has a clear moral intent: good children in the end are praised for their obedience, while the bad ones does not obtain any advantage from their beahaviour (nevertheless this rule is clearly not true in the Italian case).
    A part from the moral issue, that can be approved or not, there are the illustration made by Beatrix Potter herself.
    The drawings are very beautiful; personally I like a lot when the author draws the pictures for his own book since these illustration improve the book itself providing another point of view.
  • (4/5)
    A cute story that is a timeless classic, complemented by beautiful, simple pictures.
  • (4/5)
    Peter Rabbit diobey's his mother and goes to Mr. Mcgregor's garden where he has a huge adventure running away from Mcgregor and loosing his coat and shoes. When Peter returns home he is sick and put to bed and misses out on blackberries which the others are eating. The pop up added to this story as it let you be interactive with the story.
  • (3/5)
    The illistrations are the best part of the book, but the story is good too. I never read this book as a child, but I see why it's so popular. It's simple and sweet and there are cute little rabbits that dress in human clothing.
  • (5/5)
    Summary:This is a story about a little bunny, who was warned not to go into Mr. McGregor’s garden. However, the little bunny doesn’t listen. Mr. McGregor chases him around his garden until Peter, the rabbit, lost his shoes and his jacket. Peter finally escapes and runs home. That night, Peter was not feeling well, due to his events from the day.Personal Reflections:I love this book. I read it many times when I was a young child and it never gets old. The pictures in the story stand out and help the story seem more realistic. I felt like this story had a deeper meaning of teaching children not to steal and also to listen to our parents/guardians. Classroom Extension Ideas:1. This book is a great way to show children that misbehaving has consequences. 2. This book would also teach children that persistence pays off. If he would have given up, Peter Rabbit would have never made it out of the garden.