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Learn French! Apprends l'Anglais! THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY: In French and English

Learn French! Apprends l'Anglais! THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY: In French and English

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Learn French! Apprends l'Anglais! THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY: In French and English

évaluations:
4/5 (132 évaluations)
Longueur:
623 pages
9 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jun 2, 2012
ISBN:
9781476424347
Format:
Livre

Description

THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY/
LE PORTRAIT DE DORIAN GRAY:

This unique book features paragraph by paragraph translations from English to French, allowing the reader to learn French vocabulary and sentence structure while enjoying a famous novel.

It is a fun and affordable way to learn a second language. Previous experience with French is recommended, but ambitious beginners are welcome to give it a try.

QUICK SYNOPSIS: "The Picture of Dorian Gray" is a psychological drama, involving issues of beauty, and sensualism, as well as guilt and remorse.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jun 2, 2012
ISBN:
9781476424347
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Oscar Wilde (1854–1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet. Celebrated on both sides of the Atlantic for his wit, he is rumored to have informed a customs agent upon his arrival in America, “I have nothing to declare but my genius.” Wilde’s health and reputation were destroyed by his imprisonment for “gross indecency” in 1895, and he died in poverty a few years after his release. Today, his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, and his play, The Importance of Being Earnest, are recognized as masterpieces of English literature.  


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4.1
132 évaluations / 265 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    I knew I would love this book, and love it I did.

    You probably know the story, or you know bits of it. But actually reading it is a different experience. It's everything you expect of Wilde: witty. dry. philosophical. hilarious.

    The humour meets the dark undertones of sin well, and it makes the story feel full and complete. It's always interesting, although the pages when it goes on with philosophy can be tough to read at times (although usually ultimately humourous, as the characters are all idiots).

    All in all, it's a great read. I have nothing bad to say here.
  • (4/5)
    I was really surprised by this book. It was better than I thought it would be I really enjoyed it.
  • (4/5)
    People get older and lose their looks. Don't whine about it. Moral of the story.
  • (5/5)
    Great story about some despicable and jaded people.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of the most powerful books I have ever read. I wish I had read it long ago- I was really missing out. The writing is absolutely beautiful and drew me into the book right from the first page. The story is fascinating, the characters are complex and the plot unfolds perfectly. What I liked most was that I didn't find the book predictable. I really did not see the ending coming and was surprised at every change Dorian went through. I went from loving Dorian to hating him to not being sure how to feel about him. He was quite a nasty character at times but also fascinating. The book came together nicely in the end and overall it was just wonderful.

    For more of my reviews and recommendations, visit my blog: here
  • (5/5)
    Oscar Wilde turns his hand to the gothic horror tale and it's brilliant.
  • (3/5)
    This is a great book. I did not find it tedious or boring at all. It's a great read!
  • (5/5)
    I know this book was a little controversial but I still thought it was a great read. didnt get the whole controversy about it though.
  • (4/5)
    A brilliantly written novel enclosing important life lessons. A bit dragged out towards the end though.
  • (4/5)
    exellent timeless classic...!
  • (5/5)
    A fascinating study of beauty gone evil.
  • (4/5)
    I think Oscar Wilde was a genius, but some of his passages were too weighty for me.
  • (3/5)
    It was based on an interesting premise: A man makes a wish that he will remain as young and beautiful as a painting of himself at age 20. The wish comes true and the painting ages and worse, shows the sins of the man over time. The story is about the effect on Dorian Gray and his soul.The writing was beautiful, poetic at times. I listened to it on CD, and I think the entire disk 4 (or maybe 3) was basically a poetic narrative of Dorian's life from age 20 to 38. I got lost and my mind drifted because there were no scenes. It was way too much summary in my opinion. Of course, the book was written in the late 1800s, so it was probably appropriate for the times. But my biggest issue was the characters. I have a difficult time loving books if I can't identify or at least root for a character. And there was nothing to like about Dorian. He was a rich, vain man who did nothing but take advantage of his looks. Getting into his deluded mind was very creepy, especially when he killed (won't say who) someone with no remorse. At the end, I thought he might redeem himself as his began to realize how terrible his sins were. But even then, he made excuses and continued to act selfishly. And I didn't like his friend, Sir Henry much better.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this book a lot more than I thought I would. I liked the aging picture thing. Everyone always says that this book has a theme of homosexuality, but I just didn't see it. Perhaps I will re-read it. But ironically it does remind me of being gay, but because of personal things happening at the time with friends rather than what is actually in the book, so you'd think I would have seen it.
  • (3/5)
    Not anywhere near as entrancing as the first time I read it - but that's likely due to me aging a decade. Initially, I found Wilde's witticisms (mainly via Lord Henry) thought-provoking and... sparkly:"The reason we all like to think so well of others is that we are all afraid for ourselves. The basis of optimism is sheer terror."This time 'round, they veered more toward shit-stirring, sound-bite nonsense (intentionally? Lord Henry exists to suggest corruption and watch the show). But so long as you don't view it through the lenses of a purely self-indulgent fuck, I agree AMEN:"To be good is to be in harmony with one's self. Discord is to be forced to be in harmony with others. One's own life - that is the important thing. As for the lives of one's neighbors, if one wished to be a prig or a Puritan, one can flaunt one's moral views about them, but they are not one's concern. Besides, Individualism has really the higher aim. Modern morality consists in accepting the standard of one's age. I consider that for any man of culture to accept the standard of his age is a form of the grossest immorality."And it still managed to resonate, albeit less so (which probably means I'm less of an asshole than I was, or just more aware of fellow life):"All ways end at the same point - disillusion."*reread*
  • (4/5)
    A cigarette is the perfect type of a perfect pleasure. It is exquisite, and it leaves one unsatisfied. What more can one want?

    Most people assume we on Goodreads have read everything. It was a shock to many that I had never read Baudelaire until last week. It was a similar disclosure which saw me read this novel for the first time.

    This is a bitchy book. My brain afforded the late George Sanders the vocal delivery. Yes, I know he was in a film adaptation, but this sordid sophisticate morality tale demands such. His own end illuminates the pages.

    So why should we return to (or discover) this splendid tale, the twist of which has become a cultural landmark? We learn about beauty and privilege. We learn about the weight of ennui and other French decadence. There is sodomy, opium, and suicide. Perhaps I will open a beer and ponder how Youth bolted out the back door.
  • (3/5)
    A fantastic plot buried under too many words (mostly coming from the mouth of Lord Henry). It would have made a gripping and terrifying novella or short story. To alter an accusation from Dorian and turn it back on Wilde, "You would sacrifice any reader, Oscar, for the sake of an epigram."
  • (3/5)
    I have read this book 3 times. Every time I swear that I didn't read it - I just remember the synopsis - and then I get halfway through and realize I'm rereading it.
  • (5/5)
    Waited a long time to read this book. Glad I did.
  • (4/5)
    I was kind of underwhelmed by this one. Some interesting ideas were brought up, but the story itself wasn't as riveting as I thought it would be.
  • (4/5)
    As the novel opens, artist Basil Hallward is painting a portrait of an extraordinarily handsome young man, Dorian Gray. In a conversation with his friend, Lord Henry Wotton, Hallward tells him that he believes the portrait is the best work he’s ever done. Lord Henry arranges to meet Dorian and he soon gains influence over the impressionable young man. The finished portrait is remarkable, and Dorian unthinkingly expresses a desire that the portrait would age while he maintained the beauty of youth. Lord Henry encourages Dorian to hedonistic excess. To Dorian’s horror, his portrait becomes uglier as Dorian’s character becomes more and more corrupt. It’s as if the portrait reveals the true state of Dorian’s soul. Although I haven’t seen the academy award-winning film version of this book, I have a feeling that I’d probably like it better than the book. Wilde doesn’t leave enough to the imagination, and much of the horror in the story is diluted by wordiness.
  • (5/5)
    Another one I hadn't read since the '70s, and I wondered whether it might have aged badly, but no, like the picture itself, this is one book that has stayed as fresh and young as when it was created.

    Wilde's way with an aphorism is brilliant, and not just Dorian, but Sir Henry Wooton in particular are fully rounded characters, and perfect foils for Wilde's wit and almost casual brilliance.

    I wondered whether the movie representations would change the book for me, but all they have done is remind me how little of Wilde's inimitable style has ever transferred to the big screen.

    Beautifully written, sharp and incisive and strangely grotesque in places, I was immersed for the duration. A true classic.
  • (4/5)
    There's something in nineteenth-century British literature that I am drawn to—there is a certain musicality or lyricism to it that I love, despite its inspirations often being delusional, fantastical and at times even fetishistic. So it is of little surprise that I found The Picture of Dorian Gray a sweeping read, and one that I had little dissatisfactions with, stylistically.When painter Basil Hallward first sets his eyes upon Dorian Gray, he is a young, captivating soul of speechless beauty. Combined with his social standing, his allure sets his name aflame across countless of social spheres within England. The story begins when Basil makes Dorian his muse, and asks him to sit for a portrait that, little do they both know, will become much more than the painter's magnum opus. Lord Henry, a wealthy friend of Basil, quickly enters the scene, instilling in the Adonis a roaring, dizzying passion for life: “the few words that Basil’s friend had said to him…had touched some secret chord that had never been touched before, but that he felt now was vibrating and throbbing to curious pulses” (21). It is the whimsical, at times paradoxical musings of Lord Henry that transform Dorian Gray, whose adoration for his own portrait become the root of the story’s unfoldment.This was my first proper exposure to Wilde’s work, and it surely was a pleasant experience. I do not know the reason as to why this was his only novel, but it certainly encapsulates his interest in the Aesthetic Movement (“Art for Art’s Sake”). Filled with a rather spiritualistic love for art, humor, and thrill it makes for a lovely (and easy) read, though it lacks the depth, the grittiness, that I was looking for. But this may very well be as a consequence of its loyalty to the values of Wilde’s movement, where art existed free of social, moral and even logical obligations. This novel lacks substance or a core, but ultimately our own conclusions, our own thoughts emerge out of it to appease our own sense of what good literature should be.
  • (5/5)
    I never really wanted to read any Oscar Wilde books; they just didn't interest me. But while I was learning to use CeltX script software, "The Importance of Being Earnest" was included as a free example text. I was hooked immediately.Several plays later, I finally pick up "The Picture of Dorian Gray". It has fast become one of my favorite novels of all time.With each of the characters playing to an extreme of Wilde's personality, rather than getting a picture of Dorian Gray, you get a picture of Wilde's life. And what a rich life it was. Of course, I've been mildly infatuated with the Regency/Victorian since I read "Pride and Prejudice", but Dorian Gray succesfully turned that infatuation into what one might call an obsession.Between the vivid and beautiful prose, the witty dialogue and character relationships, and the compellingly simple story itself, I couldn't put this book down. It's a great read even if you don't like Victorian lit or history--a great read even if you're not a fan of Oscar Wilde--and a great read even if you don't like history. And, of course, if you like any or all of thsoe things, it's an *awesome* read.I recommend this book to anyone and everyone.
  • (4/5)
    A young egotistic man whispers a prayer and gets exactly what he asked for.How does one even begin to review this book? I disagreed vehemently with just about everything it proposed, and yet because of the writing, I continued to listen. Lord Henry. What are we to do with him? I've heard it proposed that he is meant to be Satan tempting Dorian, and there is an element of that, but to me he seemed more of a man who likes to hear himself talk and shock others, but doesn't really believe what he is saying. Dorian is loathsome. Innocent my foot. He latches on to the things Lord Henry says because it is in his nature already. Best described as a sociopath in my opinion. A sociopath who develops into a psychopath as easily as he puts on his gloves, and he wears well fitting gloves.What I would really like to know, is how much of Oscar Wilde's beliefs are in this book. Or, did he write it to show the absurdity of the ideas propounded? The misogyny and cynicism within are breathtaking. Were they his? He had a difficult time of it being who he was in the time he lived; did he develop these views to survive? Now I think I must go read a biography of Oscar Wilde.
  • (5/5)
    I was pleasantly surprised at how compelling I found this narrative, despite its age.
  • (4/5)
    A parable denouncing hedonism, vanity, and youth worship. It's a thickly drawn portrait with a rather obvious device to present the perils of hedonistic flippancy. It's short and worth reading for its impact on literature, art and society.
  • (2/5)
    So ... we've got a thin, blunt treatise on the perils of hedonism, vanity and retention of youth at any cost, featuring a foppish, mindless, incredibly shallow, turning-in-an-instant character meant to evoke empathic pity for a naive youth swayed to corruption by an older influence. But that fails, because Gray's youth can only be held up so long as a shield. Unless his mind and character remain as unchanged as his appearance, external influences are no excuse for lack of responsibility for one's actions.

    The characters are thickly drawn superficial caricatures - over the top cardboard cutouts. I don't know if that was the norm or if that was Wilde's method - I admit unfamiliarity with Wilde plays and themes and I also admit no desire to find out. Bad on me? No...too many other interests and not enough time for no value added.

    I understand that this book may be a commentary on the notions of Victorian culture with respect to art (that is, art has to have meaning, whereas Wilde implies beauty may have no underlying meaning). Okay. Most of the themes of this book are tired and dated, but I suppose the value of the read is the historical glimpse into how literature was required to be written at the time.

    At any rate, I now remember why I don't remember much about this story - there wasn't much to remember.

    Let the haters converge.
  • (3/5)
    All very gothic.
  • (4/5)
    I love Oscar Wilde!