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From the Publisher

Without grammar, you can’t say much; but without vocabulary, you can’t say anything.

This book is made for students of English as a Second or Foreign Language.

Learning another language is never fast, but the "Fifty Ways to Practice" series will speed things up by showing you how to practice more efficiently and effectively both inside and outside the classroom. These books can be used by beginners and advanced students alike.

You will learn 50 ways to learn, practice, and remember vocabulary in English. By applying these methods, you will improve your ability to understand and express yourself in English. You do not need to be living in an English-speaking country or be currently taking an English class to use this book. However, students who are already in a class can also use this book to improve their vocabulary more quickly and easily.

The book includes suggestions for specific websites that can be used for listening practice, as well as tips for using dictionaries effectively. Categories covered include Finding and Learning New Words; Flashcards; Practicing and Remembering Vocabulary; and Vocabulary Games.

Topics: Language, Test Prep, Tips & Tricks, Guides, and Informative

Published: Wayzgoose Press on
ISBN: 9781301040407
List price: $0.99
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