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From the Publisher

Many textbooks do a fine job of presenting grammar to students. However, some students or classes need more practice after they’ve finished the exercises in their textbook. This guide provides imaginative and enjoyable games, drills, and activities to practice different grammatical structures such as verb tenses, articles, phrasal verbs, pronouns, relative clauses, modals, word forms, syntax, and more.

This book is divided into three categories:

a) Reading-writing exercises
b) Speaking activities
c) Fun & games

Enliven your classes with information gaps, poems, game shows, guessing games, substitution drills, writing prompts, discussion topics, and more.

The Fifty Ways to Teach Them series gives you a variety of drills, games, techniques, methods, and ideas to help your students master English. Most of the ideas can be used for both beginning and advanced classes. Many require little to no preparation or special materials. The ideas can be used with any textbook, or without a textbook at all. These short, practical guides aim to make your teaching life easier, and your students’ lives more rewarding and successful.

Topics: Grammar, Education, Language, Informative, Inspirational, and Guides

Published: Wayzgoose Press on
ISBN: 9781301480432
List price: $0.99
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