• book

From the Publisher

In this exciting new e edition, Temple Grandin returns to her groundbreaking work, Animals in Translation, to address the last ten years of developments in behavioral research, animal welfare, and farming regulations. Originally published in 2005, Animals in Translation received unanimous critical praise and was a bestseller in both hardcover and paperback, and Grandin’s Q&A updates this classic text with the most current scientific research.

Grandin’s training as an animal scientist and her experience as a person with autism give her a perspective unlike any other expert in the field. Grandin and coauthor Catherine Johnson present their powerful theory that people with autism may be able to empathically understand animal behavior in a way that eludes neurotypical people—putting them in the ideal position to translate “animal talk.” Exploring animal fear, pain, aggression, love, friendship, communication, learning, and even genius, Grandin is a faithful guide into their world.

Grandin, standing at the intersection of autism and animal science, offers unparalleled observations and extraordinary ideas, revealing that animals are smarter and more complex than anyone could have imagined.

Topics: Language, Autism, Animals, Dogs, Communication, Neurology, Horses, Cognitive Science, Stress, Birds, Music, Popular Science, Personality Psychology, Inspirational, Philosophical, and Essays

Published: Scribner on
ISBN: 9781439130841
List price: $11.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Animals in Translation by Temple Grandin and Catherine Jo...
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

NPR
4 min read
Psychology

Think Your Credentials Are Ignored Because You're A Woman? It Could Be.

When I first became a professor I was 26. And female. (I'm no longer 26; still female.) The combination made me anxious about whether students would take me seriously as an authority on the material I was trying to teach. I made a point of introducing myself as "Professor Lombrozo," and I signed e-mails to students the same way — especially those addressed to Miss/Ms./Mrs. Lombrozo, or those that simply used my first name. I bought some collared shirts from Brooks Brothers; I made a point never to wear jeans when meeting with undergraduates. If I looked more like people's mental image of a pro
Nautilus
1 min read
Science

Spark of Science: Robbert Dijkgraaf: The director of the Institute for Advanced Study on the wonders of his childhood attic.

Robbert Dijkgraaf will sometimes let himself drift back to his childhood attic in the Netherlands. It was there that he did some of his first physics experiments, playing with discarded binocular optics that his father kept stacked in boxes. As he has risen to take the leadership of the Institute for Advanced Study, one of the world’s most prestigious academic institutions, those early experiences have not lost their power. “It’s very important to go back to the origin of your passion,” he says. They have also helped to shape his ideas about science education. Like many educators we talk to, D
The Atlantic
15 min read

The Challenges of Autism in Small-Town America

Morning circle is off to a rough start at LilyPad Learning Center. On a bright Monday in September, in the large preschool classroom in Madrid, Iowa, 15 children sit cross-legged, patiently waiting their turn to report whether they watched football or read books over the weekend. A wiry 4-year-old named Izzy Green dashes across the room, her long black hair trailing behind her, and runs between two of the seated children. She bursts into the center of the circle, plops herself onto the floor, and curls into a ball, moaning and clutching a little blanket. Small heads turn as Izzy rolls across t