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The Glass Castle: A Memoir

The Glass Castle: A Memoir

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The Glass Castle: A Memoir

évaluations:
4.5/5 (1,497 évaluations)
Longueur:
400 pages
6 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Dec 15, 2006
ISBN:
9781416550600
Format:
Livre

Note de l'éditeur

A triumphant exposé…

With millions of copies sold and a film adaptation starring Brie Larson, reporter Walls’ memoir is a triumphant exposé on the one subject she knows best: her dysfunctional family.

Description

From Scribd: About the Book

An engaging, emotionally charged tale of love that knows no bounds in a family that, despite its overbearing problems, gave the author the unwavering determination to carve out a life of success on her own terms.

The Glass Castle follows the story of Jeannette Walls' life growing up with her ideologically nonconforming parents. Rex, her father, and Rose Mary, her mother, were both creative types. When sober, Rex was a charismatic father who taught his children about physics, geology, and how to embrace life. Rose Mary focused on her paintings and didn't mind living life as a nomad.

Eventually, as the story often goes, the money ran out, and the romance of living a wandering life faded. The family's dysfunction eventually reached a boiling point, and the children gathered their resources and left home.

This enthralling tale of the author's childhood, and her life since, is a riveting tale. She holds nothing back, and her emotions run thick, pulling at heartstrings and enticing the reader to turn page after page.
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Dec 15, 2006
ISBN:
9781416550600
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Jeannette Walls graduated from Barnard College and was a journalist in New York. Her memoir, The Glass Castle, has been a New York Times bestseller for more than six years. She is also the author of the instant New York Times bestsellers The Silver Star and Half Broke Horses, which was named one of the ten best books of 2009 by the editors of The New York Times Book Review. Walls lives in rural Virginia with her husband, the writer John Taylor.


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4.4
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Avis critiques

  • With millions of copies sold and a film adaptation starring Brie Larson, reporter Jeannette Walls' memoir is a triumphant exposé on the one subject she knows best: her dysfunctional family. Poignant without pulling punches, Walls' witty storytelling turns her less-than-blissful childhood into engaging reading. It also landed her book on the ALA's top 10 list in 2012 for challenges due to "offensive language" and for being "sexually explicit."

    Scribd Editors
  • "The Glass Castle" is a memoir, a very personal one, that details the author's nontraditional childhood, covering how she grew up with an alcoholic father and a mother who seems to suffer from some mental illnesses. The book begins with Walls explaining what prompted her to tell her story. She tells about how, after she "made it" and became a successful writer living in New York City, she stumbled across her mother picking trash out of a nearby dumpster. In shame, she hides in her taxi seat and pretends not to see her. After digesting this event, she finds her mother later on and confronts her, asking her what she is doing, and demands to know how she is supposed to tell people who her parents are. The line her mother returns with is what spurs the entire book: "Just tell the truth. That's simple enough."

    Scribd Editors

Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    Jeanette Walls tells us about life growing up with parents who are hopelessly inadaquate as parents . they cannot and will not function in any normal way. Jeanette describes a life of poverty. A life on the move , of hunger, misadventure, bullying and depravity. Yet there is such humor and tenderness and lack of blame in her writing. It's truely amazing.
  • (5/5)
    Could not put this book down. Even after reading it I find it hard to believe, but believe I do. No one could make something like this up and it is a triumph in every sense of the word.
  • (5/5)
    This book was a startling, well written memoir. Jeannette Walls does an excellent job of telling her story of her childhood that just leaves your mouth hanging wide open. It is a story of triumphing over unsurmountable obstacle. It is a story of a family. I don't want to reveal more about the story, but I do highly recommend the book and I think most anyone will enjoy this true to life memoir.
  • (4/5)
    Hard to put down, an excellent read, a wild, true story. What I love most about Walls' achievement is that she told a harrowing story (one that often made my chin drop in shock) almost without rancor.

    Petrea Burchard
    Camelot & Vine
  • (5/5)
    This story seems too far-fetched to be true... and yet. Walls does an incredible job of describing an incredible childhood, balancing hardships with good times, while being as non-judgmental as she could with regards to unconventional parents. An eye-opening story
  • (5/5)
    What a moving story of growing up in poverty. I found the characters to be very engaging and had a hard time putting this book down. It was such an eye opening way to think about how people can get into a bad situation and how they grow through and out of it. If you like memoirs, put this one on your list.
  • (5/5)
    Jeannette Walls grew up moving from place to place, often "on the skedaddle" from bill collectors, frequently without enough to eat, despite the fact that her parents were educated, talented people. She tells the story without whining and indeed with love. An extraordinary book by a gifted writer.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent Book!!
  • (3/5)
    Although it took a few pages for me to get sunk in....when I finally did...and I was amazed! You just wanted to beat the crap outta that father and just yell at Jeanette asking her "why!!??". Engrossing. It's unbelievable that people out there have lives like this.
  • (5/5)
    An amazing book, I could not put it down. It is hard to believe that her story is true but the book is riveting.
  • (5/5)
    Great and unbelievable story about children surviving bizarre parents
  • (4/5)
    A review... for The Glass Castle. What can I say about this book that hasn't already been said."You know, it's really not that hard to put food on the table if that's what you decide to do."I couldn't give the book 5 stars because while I read it, I felt too much hatred and disappointment in the parents. There wasn't much depth to the book either, just many and many layers of why we should hate these parents to the point that, at times, it felt repetitive .I did feel happy towards the end when the girls got to New York and then how they all stuck together. I loved the kids determination to make something of themselves and how they succeeded.
  • (4/5)
    I absolutely loved this book! I had to keep reminding myself what time period this book was written in.
  • (3/5)
    Jeannette Walls lives in New York City and Virginia. She's a journalist for New York Magazine, Esquire, USA Today, and MSNBC. She's 49 and happily married. How, then, is she the author of a bestselling memoir? It all began when she cooked herself hot dogs as a toddler (yes, you read correctly).Jeannette, accompanied by her selfish, artsy mother Rose Mary, her drunken, eccentric father Rex, and siblings Maureen, Brian, and Lori, had one heck of a wild childhood. Her parents, two unbelievably odd nonconformists, are the driving force in her life. Their nomadic lifestyle across the U.S. and negligent parenting should produce delinquent children. The debate over the success of their parenting (or lack thereof), however, should be reserved until after one reads this book.There's no denying the uniqueness of Jeannette's childhood. From West to East Coast, she overcomes adversity with a smile. Many people are irked by the hopeful tone of the book. They want Jeannette to slam her parents for bringing children into the world and then not caring about the responsibility that follows. One must remember that Jeannette wrote the book; she's the one describing the characters, yet she lets the reader make his/her own judgments. It would be superfluous to waste pages criticizing Rex or Rose Mary. But there are other places that could use editing and reflection.As many others have pointed out, the writing in this book is not superb. Jeannette simply lays out the story in short, easy chapters. Even when things get repetitive (the kids fending for themselves, whether by rummaging through garbage cans or fighting off bullies), it's an enjoyable, quick read. Regardless, it could have been much more. While I despise trite, sentimental diatribes about a tough life, insightful opinions on the situations she went through would add depth.Others question the veracity of this story. Do we have another A Million Little Pieces on our hands? I think not. Even so, I could care less. As long as the plot is compelling, the writing strong, and I walk away a more well-rounded, interesting, and intelligent person for having read the book, I'd call it good. The Glass Castle falls short on these requirements.
  • (4/5)
    I didn't enjoy it as much as "Half-Broke Horse" which was much more upbeat! The amazing thing about this memoir is that she and her siblings grew up under such horrendous conditions and bizarre parenting, but on the whole turned into exceptional adults.
  • (5/5)
    This book is flawless. After finishing it, the first thing I wanted to do was call my parents to thank them for doing it right. Ms. Walls writes with complete frankness and such a matter of fact tone that I had to keep reminding myself that this is a memoir. That this extraordinary woman, and her siblings, survived a childhood with an alcoholic father and bi-polar mother. She not only survived but soared.
  • (4/5)
    A friend recommended this to me with the caveat, "You won't be able to put this down." She was right. I'm not usually a memoir fan, but this was an engaging, touching story. A sad, harrowing tale, yet it leaves you feeling uplifted instead of depressed. Highly recommended
  • (5/5)
    This is the best book I have read in the last five years. Very well written and hard to put down.
  • (3/5)

    An incredible look at what it takes to survive a dysfunctional, but loving family.

  • (5/5)
    One of the best memoirs I've ever read.
  • (3/5)
    i'm not sure why, but i don't think i'd recommend this book. the story was captivating, and the author had a hard life of abuse and neglect, but i just never felt all that attached to any characters. i liked hearing about what life was like in their town in West Virginia, to understand why her dad may have developed some of his traits. I would have liked to know more about the childhood of her mom, but I guess it is a memoir, so she can only tell us what she knows. anyway, i don't think it is a waste of time to read the book, but i wouldn't put it at the top of your list.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent story that weaves in and out of enjoyment and wanting it to just get done! But very engaging and well worth the effort to stay to the end.
  • (4/5)
    A brave true tale of how utter self-destruction, a good measure of intelligence and talent, and the best of intentions can coexist in a couple trying to raise 4 children while holding onto their dreams; and what incredible acceptance and coping skills these children possess in the face of misery, until finally (in 3 cases out of 4) growing into self-sufficient strong individuals.
  • (5/5)
    This book is so insanely beautiful and horrific all at once. It really is indescribable, but I love it. I love that she doesn't dwell on emotion itself, just describes the situations and allows you to feel it.
  • (4/5)
    This book opens with the author riding in a taxi in New York City on the way to a charity event and seeing her homeless mother rooting through a dumpster. An opening like that kind of gets your attention. The story of the author's childhood with "free spirit" parents who continually move their kids from town to town -- often vacating homes in the middle of the night -- is a manual on how not to raise children. The author and her siblings are often left to fend for themselves ... from getting food to getting an education. Although the alcoholic father and an ambivalent mother who cares more for her art then her children's welfare are the parents, it is really the author and her siblings who parent each other. How they survived and even thrived in the most difficult of circumstances is nothing short of miraculous. And the author's "coming to terms" with the realities of her parents is tremendously moving.
  • (5/5)
    This is a book you won't want to start until you have time to finish it. The acutely observed details of the author's life story, the nuanced emotions that never sink to being maudlin, and a story line that HAS to be true because it's too incredible to be made up -- all this and more make it one of the most compelling, moving books I've read.
  • (4/5)
    I've given this memoir four stars, because I found it well written and a page-turner. But.. it was so sad and depressing and somehow unredeemed. The parents never learned from their mistakes or even comprehended what they had done to their children. The parents justified their actions in wholly false ways and I wanted them called to account for this. I think the author feels that there were things about her childhood for which she is right to feel grateful, but I don't think that as readers we agree. The children suffer both physically (in ways that scar them) and psychologically (especially Maureen - who is strangely absent for much of the book, to the extent that I kept forgetting her existence) and I wanted the author to be angrier. I would not read this again.
  • (5/5)
    Walls biography begins with her looking out a taxi window and seeing her mother going thru a dumpster. , She then goes back to her childhood, beginning at her earliest memories: being burnt cooking hotdogs for herself at age 4, painting her skin so the holes in her clothes aren't as obvious, searching for food in the garbage, and much, much more. The family is comprised of unforgettable characters in this excellent, unusual book. Writing as a child, she relays the story of her and her 3 siblings, and how she made it through such a rough upbringing to become a well known columnist. Heartbreaking and poignant. Those who like this book may wish to read Wall's follow-up, Half Broke Horses, a novel based on the life of the author's grandmother, Lily Casey Smith.
  • (5/5)
    Wow. This book blew me away. It was a case of substance over style, but the style was pretty damned good. It is the memoir of a girl and her siblings growing up to an alcoholic, but loving, father and an eccentric, to say the least, mother. A lot of bad things happen in the book but so do a lot of fun and funny and loving things. It is a real conflict that runs through the story- the underlying love that the parents have for their kids, and the utter neglectful and uncaring way they parent. They both appeared intelligent people with a somewhat idealistic view of the world. Part of me liked the ethos and the lessons the parents were trying to teach their kids, but I was reading in horror and disbelief a lot of the time at how the kids were treated. They were moved around all over the place, living in dilapidated and unsafe housing if any, put in unsafe situations with really dodgy people, left alone, left hungry, not clothed, not given medical treatment for injuries ("it'll make you stronger...your body can heal itself given the chance" etc). All the while the father is drinking what little money was there, and working on the next grandiose money making scheme and the mother is chasing her dream of being an artist, resenting her kids existence and refusing to work.The kids unbelievably manage to grow up motivated and aware of the existnece of another life for themselves,, which makes great reading. I would have liked to hear more about their adult lives, but as the author is only part way through her adulthood, I guess I cant complain.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books I've ever read! So well written. Incredible story of hardship, love and perseverance.