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The Cat Who Went to Heaven

The Cat Who Went to Heaven

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The Cat Who Went to Heaven

évaluations:
4/5 (32 évaluations)
Longueur:
73 pages
49 minutes
Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 15, 2012
ISBN:
9781442465886
Format:
Livre

Description

Written by Scribd Editors

Published in 1930 by Elizabeth Coatsworth, The Cat Who Went to Heaven would go on to receive the Newbery Medal just one year later in 1931.

First published in 1930, this classic has since been illustrated thanks to Raoul Vitale in order for newer generations of readers to enjoy it the way it has been for nearly the last century.

The story follows a poor Japanese artist, his devoted housekeeper, and the cat that comes into both of their lives and changes it forever. The artist is upset when the housekeeper first comes home with the cat, rather than the dinner he had requested, but he slowly warms up to his new pet, which he comes to eventually name Good Fortune.

A surprise twist at the end brings the whole story together as Good Fortune ends up getting some true good fortune to the artist's life, but at what cost?

Éditeur:
Sortie:
May 15, 2012
ISBN:
9781442465886
Format:
Livre

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Aperçu du livre

The Cat Who Went to Heaven - Elizabeth Coatsworth

Housekeeper

Once upon a time, far away in Japan, a poor young artist sat alone in his little house, waiting for his dinner. His housekeeper had gone to market, and he sat sighing to think of all the things he wished she would bring home. He expected her to hurry in at any minute, bowing and opening her little basket to show him how wisely she had spent their few pennies. He heard her step and jumped up. He was very hungry!

But the housekeeper lingered by the door, and the basket stayed shut.

Come, he cried, what is in that basket?

The housekeeper trembled and held the basket tight in two hands. It has seemed to me, sir, she said, that we are very lonely here. Her wrinkled face looked humble and obstinate.

Lonely! said the artist. I should think so! How can we have guests when we have nothing to offer them? It is so long since I have tasted rice cakes that I forgot what they taste like! And he sighed again, for he loved rice cakes, and dumplings, and little cakes filled with sweet bean jelly. He loved tea served in fine china cups, in company with some friend, seated on flat cushions, talking perhaps about a spray of peach blossoms standing like a little princess in an alcove. But weeks and weeks had gone by since anyone had bought even the smallest picture. The poor artist was glad enough to have rice and a coarse fish now and then. If he did not sell another picture soon, he would not have even that. His eyes went back to the basket. Perhaps the old woman had managed to pick up a turnip or two, or even a peach, too ripe to haggle long over.

Sir, said the housekeeper, seeing the direction of his look, it has often seemed to me that I was kept awake by rats.

At that the artist laughed out loud.

Rats? he repeated. Rats? My dear old woman, no rats come to such a poor house as this where not the smallest crumb falls to the mats.

Then he looked at the housekeeper and a dreadful suspicion filled his mind.

You have brought us home nothing to eat! he said.

True, master, said the old woman sorrowfully.

You have brought us home a cat! said the artist.

My master knows everything! answered the housekeeper bowing low.

Then the artist jumped to his feet, and strode up and down the room, and pulled his hair, and it seemed to him that he would die of hunger and anger.

A cat? A cat? he cried. Have you gone mad? Here we are starving and you must bring home a goblin, a goblin to share the little we have and perhaps to suck our blood at night! Yes! It will be fine to wake up in the dark and feel teeth at our throats and look into eyes as big as lanterns! But perhaps you are right! Perhaps we are so miserable it would be a good thing to have us die at once, and be carried over the ridgepoles in the jaws of a devil!

But, master, master, there are many good cats, too! cried the poor old woman. "Have you forgotten the little boy who drew all the pictures of cats on the screens of the deserted temple and then went to sleep in a

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Ce que les gens pensent de The Cat Who Went to Heaven

4.0
32 évaluations / 18 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    Short, insightful, but cat sweet. Reminds you to follow compassion aside from passions.
  • (4/5)
    I never read this as a child, I am glad I got to as an adult. This is a very sweet tale worth the Asia of a legend or folk tale.
  • (5/5)

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

    It was such a heart warming tale. I myself never liked cats but after this story I learned that not all cats are the same.

    1 personne a trouvé cela utile

  • (3/5)
    Originally published in 1930, Elizabeth Coatsworth's The Cat Who Went to Heaven was the Newbery Medal winner in 1931, and relates the story of a poor Japanese artist, his devoted housekeeper, and the gentle cat that comes into their lives. Angry at first, when his housekeeper brings home a little white kitten, rather than the dinner he had been expecting, the artist is reconciled to his new pet - soon named "Good Fortune" - by her quiet good manners, and by her obvious devotion to him, to the housekeeper, and to the Buddha. When the village priest commissions a painting of the Buddha for the temple, the artist immerses himself in the life of his subject, "living" the Enlightened One's life, and becoming each animal that visited him upon his deathbed. But although Good Fortune keeps faithful watch with him, as he begins his great work, and obviously longs to be included, the artist can not include her in the painting. After all, the cat was the only animal to refuse the Buddha's teaching, and the only animal not blessed by him...This brief chapter-book (sixty-three pages, in my edition), which alternates between the main prose narrative, and short poems ostensibly written by the housekeeper, has the feeling of folklore to it. The author references the classic Japanese tale of The Boy Who Drew Cats in her text, as well as many different stories about the life of the Buddha, and his reincarnated lives in various animal forms. I found myself wondering how accurate Coatsworth's depiction was of some of these traditions, particularly as it related to Buddhist beliefs about cats. Are they really considered the only animal that is barred from heaven? Did the Japanese truly regard them as demonic? What about the lucky Beckoning Cat? Leaving this issue aside, I found the story itself very engaging, and I think young readers who enjoy animal stories will as well.There is an incredibly poignant quality to this story, and while Good Fortune's death from pure joy, when the artist relents, and includes her in the painting, sets up the concluding miracle very well - from a storytelling perspective, happy endings often work best when they follow upon terrible tragedy - this aspect of the tale is still troubling. Troubling in a good way... a haunting way. I am reminded of Tomi DePaola's The Clown of God, which was a childhood favorite of mine, and which also tells the story of a miracle. A miracle that, like this one, requires a joyful sacrifice. Perhaps all miracles do? Something I'll have to think about...
  • (1/5)
    An early Newbery Medal winner -- 1931. I wasn't drawn into this story. While it provided knowledge of Budda, and I learned some things, the story fell flat for me. Once again I find some of the early Newbery winners simply lack the depth of more recent Newbery medal and honor books.
  • (5/5)
    A 1931 Newberry Award winner and well deserving of it. The book describes and poor artist in Japan who adopts a very well mannered cat--who turns out to be very lucky. The cat prays before the statue of Buddha--and the artist is visited by the Buddhist priest to perform a commision--at painting of Buddha at his death. The book describes how the artist reviewed the life of Buddha and paints the animals who came to visit Buddha--with the cat last. A surprise twist at the end completes the story.
  • (5/5)
    Very cute. It's a fairy tale, pretty much - the characters are symbols rather than people. But it's a lovely little story, about faith and kindness; it also tells the story of the Buddha very elegantly. I was crying at the end.
  • (4/5)
    I loved the book
    But I was so sad that the cat died
  • (5/5)
    This is a very short story, that was written in the 1930s. I read it when I was in elementary school some 20 years ago, and yet I still remember he story so clearly. The story not only stuck with me all these years but it still has the power to make me tear up a bit. I think that this is a great story for any animal lover, and would happily recommend it to everyone.
  • (3/5)
    This story was a lovely little folk tale that reminded me of all the best of the Newbery books. A young man has been commissioned by the temple to paint a picture of Buddha as he blesses the animals. He slowly adds animals, telling the tale and the strength of each. Then the artist comes to the cat, an animal which had, by tradition, rejected the Buddha and thus was excluded from heaven. But it is the artist's cat that has inspired him in his work and the artist knows it is the cat's greatest wish to be included in the painting. At last, the artist makes the difficult decision to include the cat in the painting. The ending is surprising and lovely.
  • (5/5)
    This story is set in ancient Japan. On one level it is the tale of a starving artist whose housekeeper uses the last of their food money to purchase a tri-colored cat for good luck. On another level, it is the story of the Buddha's life. The author uses, to good effect, the story within a story, or "frame" story, the same strategy used in The Arabian Nights. It is an allegorical tale about both the Buddha's life and the importance of extending compassion to all. Elizabeth Coatsworth (1893–1986) was an author, poet, and artist who spent her childhood traveling around Egypt, Mexico, China, Korea, and Japan. Her own illustrations grace the book's cover and her poems are found between its chapters.
  • (4/5)
    A very sweet and educational story about a cat who blesses the life of a poor Japanese artist. Full of stories about the connections between the Buddha and the animals of the world, The Cat Who Went to Heaven is also a charming tale about the ability to redeem oneself no matter what. Children will like it's sweet message and repetitive, story-book air; older students will benefit from its message. A great tool to teach about Buddhist principles, history, or simply the qualities of compassion, redemption, humility and correct thought.
  • (3/5)
    This is the story of a starving artist who is given a cat from his housekeeper instead of food. He is angry at first, but then thinks that the cat is lucky and names him Good Fortune. A high priest from their town came to him soon after he decided to keep Good Fortune. He wanted the artist to paint the death of Buddha. There were many animals that were present at the time of his death, all except the cat. Good Fortune seems to ask if he would put a cat in the picture, but the cat is the only animal that Buddha did not allow into heaven. Will the artist risk losing his much needed money to help his new friend enter the picture and possibly heaven?This is a cute story and it is very visual. I don't know how parents would react to the students learn about Buddha. It was a cute story with a lot of visual aids and wonderful descriptions. I enjoyed the book overall, but I didn't know how some parents would react to the Buddha aspect in the story.I would use this story if we were doing a unit on different countries, such as Japan. If we cover different religions and different regions, this would be a good story to read while we study the regions or religions and customs.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about a little cat that came to live with an old Japanese artist and his housekeeper. They are very poor but happy. One day the village priest comes to visit and request that the artist paint a picture of the death of Buddha. The old man spends days and nights reliving the life of Buddha. Each time he relives Buddha’s transformation into an animal and then paints that animal on the silk. The cat, named Good Fortune, comes in to inspect each animal with growing dismay. The story goes that the cat was the only animal too proud to come visit Buddha as he was ascending into heaven. At last the artist is so overcome with sadness that Good Fortune is so hurt that he paints her into the painting. The cat comes to view it and is so happy she falls over dead. The priest comes to view the painting and tells him that the cat cannot be in the painting so it will be burned the next day.... I am going to stop right there as the ending is so amazing that I want everyone to read this book and find out for yourself. I actually cried at the end of this book. It was a very good book. This book is for children 10 and older so it might be fine to read aloud to younger children but the element of religion might be a hot topic with the parents. I would probably not want to create problems so I would leave this for older children to read on their own.
  • (4/5)
    This is a sweet fable-like story. There is a nice introduction to the life of Buddha and a pleasing resolution to the problem of the cat. I also enjoyed the setting - it was believable without hitting me over the head that this was a foreign country. The illustrations for this version were also beautiful - particularly the animals.
  • (3/5)
    I have two main objections to this book: the first is the fact that cats are repeatedly villified in it, and the second is that Good Fortune gets so excited he dies. Not the cat lover book you might guess it to be. Anyway, a poor artist adopts a highly religious cat, and the temple gives him an assignment. He tells lots and lots of stories about Buddha as he draws his picture, but his cat is sad until she is included (then she dies from happiness). The temple is going to burn the picture because of the inclusion, but a miracle happens and they realize the cat is meant to be there.
  • (5/5)
    A Japanese housekeeper goes to market but instead of bringing back food she returns with a beautiful little white cat, with a tail like a bunny and yellow and black spots on her sides. She is gentle, good mannered and prays to Buddha and appears to truly bring good luck. Soon after her arrival, one of the local Priests comes to the artist’s house and commissions a portrait of Buddha (his name was the only one left in the basket). The artist transcends through the life of Siddhartha/Buddha and as he contemplates the animal forms Buddha has taken he learns sympathy, compassion, and sacrifice for others. The cat blesses the artist and in return the cat is blessed. If You Liked This, Try: The Dark Frigate by Charles Boardman Hawes, Gay Neck: The Story of a Pigeon by Dhan Gopal Mukerji, Smoky The Cow Horse by Will James, Hitty Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field, Miss Hickory by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey. If You Liked This, Try: The Dark Frigate by Charles Boardman Hawes, Gay Neck: The Story of a Pigeon by Dhan Gopal Mukerji, Smoky The Cow Horse by Will James, Hitty Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field, Miss Hickory by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey. Awards: Newbery, 1931
  • (4/5)
    A charming children's story of some depth, to be savoured and re-read.