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The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter's Wonder

The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter's Wonder

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The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter's Wonder

évaluations:
4/5 (47 évaluations)
Longueur:
37 pages
12 minutes
Sortie:
Oct 21, 2011
ISBN:
9780811879736
Format:
Livre

Description

Written by Scribd Editors

Where does snow come from? How do the crystals form? And why is each and every snowflake unique?

This fun and exciting book is perfect for your little ones who ask a lot of questions. A visually stunning children's book with lots of scientific answers to kids' most common questions about snow. The wonderful white fluffy stuff that falls from the sky and sometimes rewards them a day off school. This book would be an excellent read for a snow day, after a good snowball fight, or even for bedtime as the snow comes down during a big storm.

Sortie:
Oct 21, 2011
ISBN:
9780811879736
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Mark Cassino is a fine art and natural history photographer. He lives in Kalamazoo, Michigan, with his wife, Pam, and their two cats.

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The Story of Snow - Mark Cassino

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Ce que les gens pensent de The Story of Snow

4.1
47 évaluations / 12 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    This informational book is not necessarily for young kids but can be adapted during a read aloud. It explains how snow begins - in the form of a speck. It goes on to explain that the speck eventually creates a snow crystal with itself in the middle and it continues growing and forming as it falls. The book provides real pictures of snow crystals in their various forms - stars, plates, and columns - and describes how every snow crystal has six arms or six sides, however, a twin is what a snow crystal with twelve arms is called. The authors describe how snow crystals are rarely perfect and can have bumps; they go on to explain how many snow crystals stuck together form a snowflake. At the end it describes why snow crystals melt when they come in contact with anything here, that no two snow crystals are alike, and the book is wrapped up by a little information on how to catch and look at your very own snow crystal.
  • (4/5)
    This is an excellent resource when going through a unit about weather, more specifically snow and the process in which it is created. It also included a lot of visuals of real snowflakes caught on film and blown up in size. Before reading this book I had no idea that there were different shaped snowflakes; some are stars, others plates, and some are even columns. This book is full of information.
  • (4/5)
    Snow seems to captivate people of all ages, and this book would draw students in to read and learn. Key vocabulary include water vapor, particle, crystal, and bacteria. This book could support NGSS standard #4 analyzing and interpreting data. Students could look at each picture of snowflakes in the book and go outside and draw pictures of snowflakes they see. Once they collect the pictures and drawings they could compare and contract the snowflakes asking questions like, how are they similar? How are the flakes different?
  • (5/5)
    The beautiful science of snow. I found myself fascinated and in even more awe of the story behind snow. Great book to read with kids in the winter.
  • (4/5)
    4.5 stars. Stunning. Lots of stuff I didn't know, and I'm a fan of science, and grew up in NW Wisconsin.
  • (5/5)
    This informational book is about the "life" of snow. It contains very detailed, beautiful pictures that really help the reader understand how snow is formed and all the different ways they can look. I would definitely recommend this book to children of elementary age and even middle school age. It was very well written in a way young people can understand and really learn cool things about snow that one most likely does not know. It also has pictures that are really helpful and beautiful and eye-catching. It also gave an idea for a project at the end that would be really neat for a child to do to see, first hand, what snow flakes look like and how intricate they really are.
  • (4/5)
    Photographer Marc Cassino explores his passion for snow in this debut picture-book, written together with physicist Jon Nelson. From the origin of snow crystals in tiny specks - of dust, ash, even pollen - around which are built ever more complex structures of ice, through a discussion of the different types of crystal possible - star-shaped dendrites, plate crystals, column crystals - The Story of Snow has everything a budding young scientist needs to know about this cold white stuff! The book even includes an afterword providing instructions on catching snowflakes, in order to examine them.Informative, engaging, and very, very beautiful - I loved Mark Cassino's up-close photographs of snow crystals! - this is the kind of science book that even those readers resistant to science will enjoy! I was particularly struck by the fact that snow crystals owe their existence - like pearls - to the introduction of tiny particles into otherwise "pristine" environments, demonstrating (for me, anyway) yet again that imperfection leads to great beauty. Highly recommended to all snow lovers, and to all young readers with an interest in science!
  • (5/5)
    I really liked this book. It explains how snow is made and includes actual pictures of individual snow crystals. it talk sabout the many different types of snow crystans and that it takes a lot of them to form one snow flake. It also gives tips on how to catch and examine snowflakes using a magnifying glass.I would use this book to talk about how in other parts of the world weather is very different and to give those who have never experienced snow some information on it.
  • (4/5)
    This book tells how snow is made. It details the journey of how those delicate, microscopic snow flakes fall to the ground. I really enjoyed reading this book because it taught me a lot of things that I never knew before. I loved the illustrations! They enlarged pictures of the snow flakes and made them look as if we were seeing them through the microscopes ourselves. It made me realize just how beautiful snowflakes really are.
  • (5/5)
    If you want to add to your winter experience, read this book about snow! Photographs and simple illustrations show how snow is formed, the shapes snow takes, and how to inspect snow on your own.
  • (4/5)
    In thirteen simple sentences, "This is the story of snow. Snow begins with a speck. ... ," The Story of Snow explains the science behind the snowflake. But there is more to this book - smaller print on each page offers a more detailed explanation of the simpler text, "Clouds are mostly made of air and water, but there are also bits of other things, like tiny particles of dirt, ash and salt...A snow crystal needs one of these "specks" to start growing."Accompanying this short (32-page) "story," are diagrams, watercolor backdrops, and striking photographs of snowflakes. Directions for catching snow crystals wrap up the book.The Story of Snow: The Science of Winter's Wonder follows a trend that I've seen a lot lately in children's non-fiction. The book is almost as multi-faceted as the snowflakes it describes - picture book, science book, story book, activity book. The simpler text may be read as a story to young listeners. Older children will benefit from the more detailed explanation. Everyone will enjoy the stunning photography. Teachers should like this one!
  • (5/5)
    Ages 4-7Did you know that in order for a flake of snow to form, you first need a piece of dust, higher than the clouds? Is it really true that no two snowflakes are alike?