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évaluations:
4/5 (369 évaluations)
Longueur:
13 pages
4 minutes
Sortie:
Jul 1, 2010
ISBN:
9781452103815
Format:
Livre

Description

From the award-winning author of Little Pea, Little Hoot, and Little Oink comes a clever take on the age-old optical illusion: is it a duck or a rabbit? Depends on how you look at it! Readers will find more than just Amy Krouse Rosenthal's signature humor herethere's also a subtle lesson for kids who don't know when to let go of an argument. A smart, simple story that will make readers of all ages eager to take a side, Duck! Rabbit! makes it easy to agree on one thing—reading it again!
Sortie:
Jul 1, 2010
ISBN:
9781452103815
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Amy Krouse Rosenthal is the bestselling author of Little Pea, Little Oink, Duck! Rabbit!, Spoon, Cookies: Bite Size Life Lessons as well as Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life for adults. She is the creator of a performance art movie called "The Beckoning of Lovely" in which lots of strangers do things together (see www.thebeckoningoflovely.wordpress.com), is a frequent contributor on NPR, notably "Writers Block Party" on Chicago Public Radio, and is at work on many other books. See also Amy's website at www.whoisamy.wordpress.com. Amy lives with her family in Chicago, IL.

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Duck! Rabbit! - Amy Krouse Rosenthal

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Ce que les gens pensent de Duck! Rabbit!

4.1
369 évaluations / 69 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    Very cute, visual book
  • (3/5)
    Maybe I'm a cynic, but it's a bit "thin gruel" to make a whole book out of this frivolous trick?
  • (4/5)
    Author Amy Krouse Rosenthal and illustrator Tom Lichtenheld team up in this amusing picture-book examination of perspective, as two unseen narrators argue about whether the creature before them is a duck or a rabbit. It all depends upon how you look at it, as it happens...Justly praised as a means of explaining differing perspectives and opinions to younger children, I think Duck! Rabbit! also works very well as an exploration of visual orientation. It's an interesting thing, how one "reads" an image, and is tied I believe, to how one reads text. The standard western method of reading from left to right influences western artistic standards, with paintings and other visual works of art often considered most powerful, when moving across the canvas in that same direction. But what happens if one reads in a language that moves across the page from right to left? Will this influence how one "reads" artwork? This engaging little book really demonstrates this kind of visual orientation, and I suspect that most young western readers will have an easier time seeing the rabbit, and will have to look a little harder for the duck. I know I did! Recommended to anyone looking for picture-books containing visual puzzles and/or games, and to those in the market for children's stories teaching about perspective, and how it can change.
  • (5/5)
    Two unseen persons argue over whether a creature before them is a duck or a rabbit, each making arguments to push their case. This book is a fun twist on an optical illusion. It is chock full of humor, with the simple illustrations essential to the storytelling. Kids and adults will both enjoy the silly bits, and this makes a great read-aloud. Because there are two voices, two readers make it even more fun.
  • (4/5)
     A duck, A rabbit, two people ague what it is. It looks like both, depending on what way you see it. It is a super cute book.
  • (1/5)
    I guess I'm the only person on Goodreads who doesn't care whether it's a duck or a rabbit.
  • (4/5)
    It's worth a discussion - but be sure to say why you think so.
  • (4/5)
    illustration assignment
  • (5/5)
    The simple illustrations allow the reader to form their own opinions about whether the animal is a duck or a rabbit. My four-year olds love reading this book and it is one that they will pick out and read on their own.
  • (5/5)
    I don't think it was a duck or a rabbit. I think it was a platypus. Nuff said.
  • (4/5)
    I have read this book with my students many times. Throughout the story a child could see the illustration as a duck and/or a rabbit. It's a book about interpretation and perspective because both animals can be seen and both ideas are supported through the text and illustrations.
  • (4/5)
    Is it a duck or is it a rabbit? This book is an optical illusion to the reader to decide if the creature is a duck or a rabbit. With different illustrations of the animal, Rosenthal shows readers that not everything is what it seems.
  • (5/5)
    "Duck! Rabbit!" was about an animal that two people could not decide if it was a duck or a rabbit. One person said it was a duck and the other a rabbit. It was funny to see how they argued and tried to prove their point to the other. The main message was how two people may never see eye to eye. It is important for students to see that not everyone is going to agree on everything, but it is still important to be respectful. Also, it is important to see that everyone has opinions and you are going to have to leave to "agree to disagree" I recommend this to everyone in about 2nd grade because of the importance of this main message. I enjoyed this book because of the main message and because it is very funny. It was also unique and original.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of my class' favorite books because it is so ridiculous, and funny. I have children who get into legitimate arguments about whether or not this creature is a duck or rabbit. Overall, this book will inspire lively debate in your classroom.
  • (2/5)
    Adorable book about a rabbit/duck illusion children have to switch between seeing a rabbit and a duck. The illustrator did an extremely cleaver job with the illusions. Children stay engage with with the pictures and enjoy how a rabbit and a duck can look the same, but can be perceived in so many different ways. This book is wonderful for younger ages.
  • (4/5)
    Fun book! I'm looking forward to reading this to my kids and having a fun debate as to what we see. Great book to spark discussion about different perspectives and points of view. Would also be a good book to practice stating and supporting your argument.
  • (4/5)
    This is a clever book that explores the age old question- is it a duck, or is it a rabbit?! I love that children can see both sides of the "argument", and it teaches them to try to appreciate others' perspectives. The story helps to explore the idea that we do not need to argue, it can be either! It also teaches the lesson that there can often be more than one "right answer". The illustrations are simple, yet well done.
  • (5/5)
    This was a great realistic fiction book about two characters disagreeing as to whether they saw a duck or a rabbit. When looking at the illustration one way it looks like a duck with a long bill, but looking at it another way shows a bunny with big ears. There is a running banter throughout the book of two characters, whom you never see, that are trying to convince each other it is a duck or a bunny. In the end the animal disappears and the characters begin to see what the other person could have been seeing. Then another animal appears and they disagree on what it looks like as well.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this book for three reasons. First, I liked that it had different points of view. On every page of text, one side of the page talked about why it was a duck. The other side explained why it was a rabbit. For example, it says “Now the duck is wading through the swamp”. It also says on the same page “No, the rabbit is hiding in the grass”. I also like that it was an E-book. Since the book was online, it was very interactive. The pictures on the page moved, which kept my interest the entire time. Finally, I like the illustrations of the book and the voices of the characters reading the book out loud. Each character had a different voice, so even though the lines were on the same page, it was read like it came from two different people, arguing.
  • (3/5)
    I did not particularly think this was a good book. The goal of the book seemed to be to get readers to understand that you can look at one picture from different perspectives. The author achieved this by displaying a picture of an animal that appeared to be a duck looking from one angle and a rabbit looking from the opposite angle. The text on either side of the page corresponded to either the picture being a rabbit or a duck. The writing was extremely boring as most of the pages consisted of “It’s a Duck… It’s a Rabbit” over and over again. The illustrations were equally as boring due to the fact that it was the same image of the duck/rabbit on every page. Possibly the only quality part of this book was the fact that it included second person in using point of view. This made it seem like a conversation that the reader was overhearing rather than just a narrator spouting off information. Ultimately, the message was that things might not always be as they seem. The author ends by having each character confess that they can agree that they think it could be either a duck or a rabbit.
  • (5/5)
    Cute book, my son laughed over each page. He said its a loved it.
  • (5/5)
    Funny and ingenious. It reminds me of a game children often play: seeing shapes in clouds.
    Same concept here, but applied to a duck... Or is it a rabbit? ;-)
    The illustrations depict the same shape but in different contexts.

    For toddlers.
  • (5/5)
    i like the rabit it is cute and the duck
  • (5/5)
    What a great book for sparking conversation! This would be excellent to use as a prompt for opinion writing.
  • (5/5)
    Hilarious and clever
  • (4/5)
    The heavy line drawings are reminiscent of Eric Rohmann, but the book has a humor all its own. The dialog between two unseen characters arguing over whether the object they're looking at is a duck or a rabbit is entertaining in its own right, amd also makes a great jumping off point for conversations about other pictures that can portray two different scenes, depending on how the viewer approaches them.
  • (5/5)
    #3 on the Barnes and Noble Top Ten Children's Books of 2009

    I have always been fascinated by images that look like two things at once, which is why I think I like this book so much. Is it a duck? Is it a rabbit? I'm pretty sure it's just awesome.
  • (5/5)
    Is it my mood? The weather? The phase of the moon? I don't know, but this book struck me as totally clever, new and fun. Is that a duck or a rabbit on the cover? Two unseen people debate the fact and really, drawn as it is, you just can't tell - it all depends on your perspective. Great book for sharing with preschoolers or even younger elementary kids.
  • (4/5)
    Genre: FantasyGenre Critique: This book is an example of a fantasy story because of the author's ability to portray the unbelievable (indistinct picture) into the believable (a duck... or is it a rabbit?) just through the use of the words in the story. The pieces to the story all hold together based on what the author has written, and it seems believable that the picture being seen is either a duck or a rabbit.Review/Critique: This book was a really fun read, and a great picture puzzle for the mind. All throughout reading it I could see the distinction of either a duck or a rabbit, but mainly saw it as a duck. The second time through reading though, I could mainly see it as a rabbit. It was a fun little puzzle that would be great for kids to look at and experience as well.Media: Ink, water color, and a little bit of colored pencil
  • (5/5)
    Great book illustrating to children that there are always at least two ways of looking at things.