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Arlene Sardine

Arlene Sardine

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Arlene Sardine

évaluations:
4/5 (24 évaluations)
Longueur:
34 pages
3 minutes
Sortie:
Mar 19, 2013
ISBN:
9781453296080
Format:
Livre

Description

So, you want to be a sardine?
Once there was a fish named Arlene, who wanted to be a sardine. She wanted to be a sardine just like the silvery, salty fish that you see in those little tins at the grocery store. With the bold brushstrokes of his vibrant illustrations, Chris Raschka follows Arlene’s journey from a fjord to a big net to a briny bath aboard a fishing boat. And he reveals just how to get packed like a sardine!

This fixed-layout ebook, which preserves the design and layout of the original print book, features read-along narration.
  
Sortie:
Mar 19, 2013
ISBN:
9781453296080
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Chris Raschka (b. 1959) is an author and illustrator of picture books. He was born in Pennsylvania and raised outside of Chicago, Illinois. He began painting as a child but was also interested in becoming a doctor, so he got a college degree in biology and applied to medical school. On the first day of class, though, he changed his mind. Raschka began to write and draw professionally; his early books include the Caldecott Honor winner Yo! Yes? (1993), The Blushful Hippopotamus (1996),and Arlene Sardine (1998). He has won acclaim for his striking, minimalist style and his ability to tell a story with just one or two dozen words. An accomplished violist, Raschka has also written many books about music, including John Coltrane’s Giant Steps (2002), Simple Gifts (1998), and Charlie Parker Played Be Bop (1992). He has won Caldecott medals for The Hello, Goodbye Window (2005) and A Ball for Daisy (2011), an entirely wordless book.

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Arlene Sardine - Chris Raschka

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Ce que les gens pensent de Arlene Sardine

3.9
24 évaluations / 20 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    This was the most shocking children's book I have read so far. I'm not sure I would read this book to the little ones. The moral of the story is becoming what you aspire to be when you grow up. In this case, Arlene wanted to be a sardine.
  • (2/5)
    This is an outstanding book to read to kids. I would use this book to introduce aquatic wild life or processed food.
  • (4/5)
    Arlene wants to be a sardine, but doesn't seem to understand what the process entails (namely her own death). The matter-of-fact presentation of Arlene's demise is set against an eerily cheery backdrop of colorful cartoon-esque drawings. Raschka's meaning is left open to interpretation making this a choice for a wide range of audience. Strange, but somehow endearing at the same time. I think this text generates lots of questions for readers who are capable of reading between the lines of the fish nets.
  • (1/5)
    Loved Raschka's visual appeal - the cover is so clever, and the vibrant illustrations match Arlene's sweet vitality for life. I think the story activates discussion on vocabulary - readers need to understand what a sardine is (a dead fish) and can then start to anticipate that by wishing to be one, Arlene is in for quite the surprise. Although she is happy once she achieves sardine-status, is it worth it to become something she truly is not?
  • (4/5)
    Once again Chris Raschka uses brightly colored illustrations to aid in this sad yet actually lovely story of a fish who wishes to become a sardine. Arlene is unaware that achieving this goal means she will die, but in the end she has accomplished her goal. This could generate great discussions by readers who will certainly interpret the meaning/lesson in various ways.
  • (4/5)
    Arlene is a fish who dreams of becoming a sardine, but does she really know what that means?Another great tale by Chris Raschka, this colorful book could be used to discuss the idea of death with children.
  • (2/5)
    My Resources and Services for children prof read this children's book out loud as an example of a book she bought once without reading reviews first. A definite mistake.
  • (5/5)
    Arlene wants to be a sardine when she grows up. This is a rather morbid story that combines the aspiration of goals, the life cycle, journeys, and death. Arlene inspires basically to be a dead fish.
  • (5/5)
    Arlene is a fish who dreams of becoming a sardine. Does Arlene understand that in-order to become a sardine she must die, children may not understand this at first but this book could help open class discussion on why Arlene wants to be a sardine.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting little book. Arlene is a sardine that is packed and shipped across the world. Would be a great way to discuss death in a classroom by using a very abstract book.
  • (5/5)
    Arlene is a sardine who gets caught in a net and sent to a cannery. The author/illustrator explains the food cycle in a way that even the youngest kids can understanding. As always, his illustrations are colorful and engaging.
  • (5/5)
    When this book was read to us in class I thought to myself.. "what a morbid book". I began to think about it more and thought it was a pretty good book. It has a good story and it was upfront and direct in it's message. It was also on a level that young children could understand. Overall I did like this book and I would read it to my future students.
  • (3/5)
    This was a very colorful and interesting book. I loved the way the words flowed and I loved the upbeat-ness to the story because it without it, the story could be taken in a whole different, more sad direction.
  • (4/5)
    Arlene is a fish who wants to become a sardine. This is a story of how a fish is caught in a net, left without food for three days, and then shipped to a factory to become packed in a can. Arlene Sardine teaches children about the food cycle and the process that fish go through before they are on the shelf in the grocery. Some children may find this book upsetting because the fish dies and is cooked. On the other side it is a great book for young children to begin learning how fish and animals are used for food. Learning how fish and animals are made into food can be difficult to explain and Arlene Sardine helps because it tells the basic steps of a fish becoming a sardine in a can.
  • (5/5)
    Arlene Sardine is a colorful book about the cycle of life. Arlene is to become a sardine. It starts with her at birth and then meeting her fate, a fishing net. Once she is caught she starts her journey in becoming a packaged and distributed fish. I think that is a very interesting different book. Death is apart of life and life is apart of death. What a unique book! I have never thought of the life of a sardine before.
  • (4/5)
    Chris Rashka explains the process of Sardine distribution in an interesting way.
  • (4/5)
    Odd is all I can say! I love odd, so this is probably why I loved this book. The purpose of this book was to also talk about the cycle of life; with life comes death, and with death comes life. It is a never ending circle. This book;however, uses a fish to help children understand the "circle of life" (quoted from The Lion King.) But! This is not just any fish, it is a sardine, Arlene Sardine to be exact. The author describes her birth, coming to be a sardine, and then meeting her fate once she went into a net. He then went on to describe how she was packaged and shipped all over to a destination where someone would eventually buy a can of sardines to eat. This not only teaches children about the cycle of life, but that goods are imported and exported all over the world. Children night also have a different reaction to the book regarding the cycle of life, because they might make connections to their own lives (text to self connections) with Arlene Sardine. The children might compare what happens to Arlene, to their deceased relatives, for example, which may help them understand these unfortunate events. Help your child understand the cycle of life with a unique twist by reading to them, "Arlene Sardine."
  • (5/5)
    I currently own three copies of this book because as soon as I realized it was out of print (criminal!), I started buying up copies to give to friends. I understand that loving this book is apparently somewhat unusual, but really? Sublime. Completely sublime.The book begins "So you want to be a sardine", and continues in the standard vein of "so you want to be" books from there.
  • (1/5)
    Wish I had realized this is not a child friendly book before reading it to my kids. Starts off as a sweet story about a fish and ends up a horror story of dead fish in can.
  • (4/5)
    The story of how sardines are made.Genre: FictionAge(s): 6-9