Editor’s Note

“A beloved heroine...”

Bestselling author Jesmyn Ward told “TIME” why she loved this Newberry Award winner as a child: “The heroine is tough, stubborn, and smart, taking on a world bent on making her less than she is. I empathized.”
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher

In Robin McKinley’s Newbery Medal–winning novel, an outcast princess must earn her birthright as a hero of the realm

Aerin is an outcast in her own father’s court, daughter of the foreign woman who, it was rumored, was a witch, and enchanted the king to marry her.

She makes friends with her father’s lame, retired warhorse, Talat, and discovers an old, overlooked, and dangerously imprecise recipe for dragon-fire-proof ointment in a dusty corner of her father’s library. Two years, many canter circles to the left to strengthen Talat’s weak leg, and many burnt twigs (and a few fingers) secretly experimenting with the ointment recipe later, Aerin is present when someone comes from an outlying village to report a marauding dragon to the king. Aerin slips off alone to fetch her horse, her sword, and her fireproof ointment . . .

But modern dragons, while formidable opponents fully capable of killing a human being, are small and accounted vermin. There is no honor in killing dragons. The great dragons are a tale out of ancient history.

That is, until the day that the king is riding out at the head of an army. A weary man on an exhausted horse staggers into the courtyard where the king’s troop is assembled: “The Black Dragon has come . . . Maur, who has not been seen for generations, the last of the great dragons, great as a mountain. Maur has awakened.”

Topics: First in a Series, Outcasts, Princesses, Dragons, Female Protagonist, Coming of Age, Feminism, Love Triangle, Third Person Narration, Exciting, and Touching

Published: Open Road Media an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781497673656
List price: $6.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Hero and the Crown
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

New York Magazine
2 min read

Our Book Critic’s 5 Most Anticipated

AGAINST EVERYTHING: ESSAYS SEPT. 6, BY MARK GREIF Following on the heels of last year’s ambitious, if somewhat clunkily titled The Age of the Crisis of Man: Thought and Fiction in America, 1933–1973, Grief’s new book collects more than a decade’s worth of provocations from a founder of n+1. In it, he traces the arc of a young intellectual through the Bush and Obama administrations, from the gym to the ramparts. SUBSTITUTE: GOING TO SCHOOL WITH A THOUSAND KIDS SEPT. 6, BY NICHOLSON BAKER Baker is an obsessive with immense powers of observation, a strong social conscience, and, as those fam
TIME
2 min read

When Less Plot Is Actually More

AFTER WRITING SEVEN NOVELS AND three works of nonfiction, acclaimed British author Rachel Cusk began to find fiction “fake and embarrassing.” Two years ago, she explained to a British newspaper, “Once you have suffered sufficiently, the idea of making up John and Jane and having them do things together seems utterly ridiculous.” No surprise, then, that her 2014 novel Outline was anything but plot-driven. It was more like a series of observations by a narrator as she traveled to Greece to teach writing. The people she met along the way essentially became the subjects of miniature profiles craf
The Atlantic
1 min read
Religion & Spirituality

A Graphic Novel About 17th-Century Philosophy

Dark spots across the sun, men burned at the stake, an all-powerful church that brooks no idea outside its dogma—there is no subject so imbued with drama, intrigue, and fast-paced action as 17th-century Western philosophy. And thus no medium does it justice like the graphic novel. No, really. Heretics!, a graphic novel by Steven and Ben Nadler, introduces readers to what is arguably the most interesting, important, and consequential period in the history of Western philosophy. While respecting recent scholarship on 17th-century thought, the Nadlers sought to make these stories and ideas as ac