• book

From the Publisher

The Blue Sweater is the inspiring story of a woman who left a career in international banking to spend her life on a quest to understand global poverty and find powerful new ways of tackling it. It all started back home in Virginia, with the blue sweater, a gift that quickly became her prized possession--until the day she outgrew it and gave it away to Goodwill. Eleven years later in Africa, she spotted a young boy wearing that very sweater, with her name still on the tag inside. That the sweater had made its trek all the way to Rwanda was ample evidence, she thought, of how we are all connected, how our actions--and inaction--touch people every day across the globe, people we may never know or meet. From her first stumbling efforts as a young idealist venturing forth in Africa to the creation of the trailblazing organization she runs today, Novogratz tells gripping stories with unforgettable characters--women dancing in a Nairobi slum, unwed mothers starting a bakery, courageous survivors of the Rwandan genocide, entrepreneurs building services for the poor against impossible odds.

She shows, in ways both hilarious and heartbreaking, how traditional charity often fails, but how a new form of philanthropic investing called "patient capital" can help make people self-sufficient and can change millions of lives. More than just an autobiography or a how-to guide to addressing poverty, The Blue Sweater is a call to action that challenges us to grant dignity to the poor and to rethink our engagement with the world.

Topics: Poverty, Politics, Genocide, Inspirational, Provocative, and Africa

Published: Rodale on
ISBN: 9781605296708
List price: $15.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Blue Sweater by Jacqueline Novogratz
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Fortune
4 min read
Society

The Business Of Humanity

BILLIONS OF PEOPLE in the world are shut out. They have no membership in the financial institutions of life that allow those in richer nations to save, invest, borrow, build, and trade freely. Tens of millions of people, a huge share of them children, have been left stateless by war and poverty; many more live lives of subsistence in remote or rural regions of the world. As transformative as the Internet, mobile payment systems, and microlending have been in bringing many of the “unbanked” into the global economy and in lifting standards of living, too many people still have little or no acces
TIME
3 min read
Society

A Utopian Idea Whose Time May Finally Have Arrived

SOMETIMES, ALL IT REALLY TAKES to change the course of history is a bit of dusting. That’s happened recently as economists and policymakers began seriously re-examining the 500-year-old concept of a basic-income guarantee. The most debated version, known as universal basic income (UBI), is simple enough: the government would pay every adult citizen a salary, regardless of wealth, employment income or if they worked at all. Doing so, theory goes, might solve a host of endemic economic problems, from poverty to chronic joblessness, that are only likely to worsen in the coming century. The kerne
The Atlantic
3 min read
Politics

The Conservative Plan to Tackle Poverty

While fighting poverty hasn’t historically been a major focus of the Republican Party platform, House Speaker Paul Ryan has said that it will be one of his top priorities in the coming year. Approximately 13 percent of Americans live below the poverty line, a fact Ryan says is one of the “most persistent, stubborn problems facing the country.” That—at least—is something that both Democrats and Republicans can agree on. But when it comes to how to solve this problem, the two parties’ ideas differ greatly. On Thursday, at a conference hosted by the conservative American Enterprise Institute and