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Nine Innings: The Anatomy of a Baseball Game

Nine Innings: The Anatomy of a Baseball Game

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Nine Innings: The Anatomy of a Baseball Game

évaluations:
3/5 (2 évaluations)
Longueur:
413 pages
8 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Apr 10, 2000
ISBN:
9780547527529
Format:
Livre

Description

You'll never watch baseball the same way again. A timeless baseball classic and a must read for any fan worthy of the name, Nine Innings dissects a single baseball game played in June 1982 -- inning by inning, play by play. Daniel Okrent, a seasoned writer and lifelong fan, chose as his subject a Milwaukee BrewersendashBaltimore Orioles matchup, though it could have been any game, because, as Okrent reveals, the essence of baseball, no matter where or when it's played, has been and will always be the same. In this particular moment of baseball history you will discover myriad aspects of the sport that are crucial to its nature but so often invisible to the fans -- the hidden language of catchers' signals, the physiology of pitching, the balance sheet of a club owner, the gait of a player stepping up to the plate. With the purity of heart and unwavering attention to detail that characterize our national pastime, Okrent goes straight to the core of the world's greatest game. You'll never watch baseball the same way again.
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Apr 10, 2000
ISBN:
9780547527529
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Daniel Okrent was the first public editor of The New York Times, editor-at-large of Time, Inc., and managing editor of Life magazine. He worked in book publishing as an editor at Knopf and Viking, and was editor-in-chief of general books at Harcourt Brace. He was also a featured commentator on two Ken Burns series, and his books include Last Call, The Guarded Gate, and Great Fortune, which was a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize in history. He lives in Manhattan and on Cape Cod with his wife, poet Rebecca Okrent.


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3.0
2 évaluations / 1 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    Nine Innings gives you exactly what it says on the label: A description, in minute detail, of a single baseball game between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Baltimore Orioles. Daniel Okrent follows the action, pitch-by-pitch and out-by-out, through nine chapters: one for each inning. The result is a narrative far more richly textured than any sports-section write-up or broadcast play-by-play – more richly textured, perhaps, than any ever published in book form. Okrent is not content, however, to just narrate the action. At (seemingly) every opportunity he pulls back from a particular event on the field to add background and context. A pitcher’s choice of a slider becomes the occasion for a brief gloss on the pitch’s history and dynamics. Paul Molitor’s first at-bat is accompanied by a tour through the five positions he played for the Brewers in the space of two seasons, before settling at second base. Milwaukee owner (and later baseball commissioner) Bud Selig and Baltimore manager Earl Weaver, whose decisions set the stage for much of what happens on the field, loom large, but even equipment managers and absent players (Cecil Cooper of the Brewers, sidelined by injury) get their moments.Okrent’s concept is fascinating: Reveal the full extent to which even a “routine” and “ordinary” ball game is complex, and rooted in the history of the series, the season, prior seasons, and the larger history of baseball. There have been in-depth studies of particular seasons (Cait Murphy’s Crazy ‘08) and series (Buzz Bissinger’s Three Nights in August , and minute studies of the subtleties of the game (George Will’s Men at Work), but there is, to the best of my knowledge, nothing else like Nine Innnings in the vast literature of baseball. That Okrent has filled that gap is, all by itself, praiseworthy.The fact that the book is unique means, however, that it’s hard to gauge whether any given reader is going to like it . . . or want to read the entire thing. There’s no way to say, reliably, “If you liked X, you’ll like Nine Innings because there’s no title that could be substituted for X. I’ve read more than my share of tightly focused baseball books . . . but ran out of steam somewhere in the fourth inning of this one, even as I admired Okrent’s research and narrative craftsmanship.Make no mistake: This “inside baseball” at its most inside. There’s no structure beyond that imposed by the rhythms of the game itself, no central character (like Tony LaRussa in Three Nights in August, and no dramatic climax (like the pennant-deciding Red Sox-Yankees playoff game in David Halberstam’s The Summer of ‘49) to which the narrative builds. Truly loving (and, likely finishing) this book requires relishing the details for their own sake. Even if your thirst for inside baseball has limits, however, Nine Innings is worth dipping into, at least for a few at-bats.