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Life of Pi

Life of Pi

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Life of Pi

évaluations:
4/5 (845 évaluations)
Longueur:
423 pages
7 heures
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jun 4, 2002
ISBN:
9780547416113
Format:
Livre

Description

Winner of the 2002 Man Booker Prize for Fiction

Pi Patel is an unusual boy. The son of a zookeeper, he has an encyclopedic knowledge of animal behavior, a fervent love of stories, and practices not only his native Hinduism, but also Christianity and Islam. When Pi is sixteen, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes. The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger. Soon the tiger has dispatched all but Pi, whose fear, knowledge, and cunning allow him to coexist with Richard Parker for 227 days lost at sea. When they finally reach the coast of Mexico, Richard Parker flees to the jungle, never to be seen again. The Japanese authorities who interrogate Pi refuse to believe his story and press him to tell them "the truth." After hours of coercion, Pi tells a second story, a story much less fantastical, much more conventional-but is it more true?
Life of Pi is at once a realistic, rousing adventure and a meta-tale of survival that explores the redemptive power of storytelling and the transformative nature of fiction. It's a story, as one character puts it, to make you believe in God.
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jun 4, 2002
ISBN:
9780547416113
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

YANN MARTEL was born in Spain in 1963 of Canadian parents. Life of Pi won the 2002 Man Booker Prize (among other honors) and was adapted to the screen in the Oscar-winning film by Ang Lee. Martel is also the author of the novels The High Mountains of Portugal, Beatrice and Virgil, and Self, the collection of stories The Facts Behind the Helsinki Roccamatios, and a collection of letters to the prime minister of Canada, What Is Stephen Harper Reading?. He lives in Saskatchewan, Canada.


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4.1
845 évaluations / 529 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    I listened to this on CD. The reader did a great job with the accents, really bringing the story to life. If I had been reading on the page, I might have skipped some of the meandering facts with which the story began, the information on animal behavior, and then later the unbearable tedium of life on the ocean. But having gone through it all, I was rewarded with a sense of having shared his Pi's survival. I am not sure about the coda: why the alternate version of events, the reader's choice which to believe, the horrific seemingly realistic version, or the one where the boy lives with a tiger? It seems like a standard metafiction move. I can't decide if it really added anything, but I suppose the fact that it makes me ask that question is the something that it added.Addendum: can't stop thinking about this book since the tiger mauling in San Francisco.
  • (3/5)
    I'd like to rate this book 3.5. Parts of it I would give 4 stars, but it really dragged in places with no specific reason. There was a lot of time spent discussing Pi's religions. I loved the dramatic scenes on the raft with the tiger. Very well written. A book that is so different from other novels, I always enjoy. I just don't think it was a solid 4 stars throughout the book.
  • (3/5)
    Good but weird. I have NO idea what that island was all about.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful, surprising story that held me through to the end. I can understand why this was made into a movie--lush visuals, powerful conflict and the human struggle all wrapped into one.
  • (4/5)
    It took awhile to read it. I found it an interesting read but not something I could sit and consume in one or two sittings.
  • (5/5)
    GREAT book.
  • (5/5)
    Brilliant!
  • (4/5)
    really enjoyed this little adventure. i like how you get sucked into the life and perceptual lens of the main character. his reality becomes you own.
  • (4/5)
    My impression of this book suffers for the circumstances under which I read it. I was ill in hospital and near bed-ridden, so the parallel of a boat drifting on the Pacific ocean and the monotony of my days in a closed room felt very much overlapped.I feel that the base story of this book is well known, or at least what makes up the bulk of the setting, and I'm not sure one can say much more without getting into a lengthy conversation about "why?" It is ponderous outside of Pi's daily survival activities, and few books have made both inclined to think and inclined to accept the face value at the same time.Perhaps I will read it again, to see just how much my state of mind was colouring my view at the time.
  • (4/5)
    Loved the end!
  • (5/5)
    Great book for seven reasons:1. Many names of places in Paris and India have magic power. To name the main character in a novel "Molitor Patel" thus linking India and Paris via Pondichery, is genius.2. Swimming pools allow to be aquatic for a while: Piscine is away - cast away3. The book maked me a compulsive reader. I wanted so much that Piscine and Richard Parker are happy and well.4. While reading the book I lived with a big feline presence, imagining it to come round the corner of my street any minute.5. The main character is smart but not bragging about it like authors often do (Potok or Semprun). 6. Time and place are mostly unclear. Close to fairy tales. The end: is it true or is it not true? reminds the start of any fairy tales from the Magreb: "Once upon a time there was...or there wasn't. Also a good reason the read again "Noms de pays" last part, first book: Du côté de chez Swann" à la recherche du temps perdu M. Proust.7. If faith must be adopting three at the same time is a great option.
  • (4/5)
    The story in Life of Pi describes the book itself. It is the impossible tale of a boy, trapped on a lifeboat alone with a 450-pound tiger for 227 days. It is a story that, like the ocean waves, has its ups and downs. Just when it seems like you’ll never reach dry land, you do. And when you look back on this book, much like being adrift at sea, the ordeal blurs together into one journey that has a clear beginning and ending, but no clear middle. And that ending—boy, it’s a day you’ll never forget.

    The 2002 Man Booker Prize winner was a highly refreshing read. Even considering the absurd premise, it was not what I expected. Yet, this novel wasn’t absurd at all. It almost seemed believable. And although Life of Pi had many comical passages, it also had just as many dramatic ones. It is such a well-rounded title I barely can imagine a better stab at the marooned premise.

    Life of Pi’s highest points happen as the protagonist of the story, Pi, explores his choice of religion. These moments provide both comical relief and careful consideration, and Martel handled both with care. And of course there is the final part of the book, where Pi explains his ordeal to two Japanese men. These final pages are the books greatest: hilarious, heart wrenching, and brilliant.

    The lowest points are not so low, they are tedious, but this is necessary. What is a “lost at sea” book that doesn’t drag out the trials of being adrift? Otherwise, what joy is there in the reader of being found? So, the longest part of Life of Pi chronicles the 227 days Pi and the tiger are together on a solitary lifeboat. And since tigers don’t talk, much of the novel is filled with descriptive narrative.

    Before starting Martel’s prize winning novel, I wasn’t sure what I was going to think of it. Now I must admit I was quite surprised. Like the castaway experience, however, I wouldn’t want to go through the ordeal again, but I will not likely soon forget the story.
  • (4/5)
    # WintersRespite Interesting, I may have to watch the movie now to see how they do it.
  • (4/5)
    It took me a while to get into this, but then I couldn't put it down. Martel clearly intends us to see the story as more than just a tale of survival but he leaves the final interpretation up to the reader. I'm not sure what the point is of the section on the weird island.
  • (4/5)
    If this hadn't been recommended to me I would never had read it. It sounded to bizarre. But it is one of the most thought-provoking and profound books I have read. The descriptions are incredible. At times it was rather harrowing...unforgettable.
  • (4/5)
    My initial impression of this book was influenced quite profoundly by my having just read every work Richard Rorty ever authored. It seemed to jibe perfectly with Rorty's views about irony and self-creation, and with the "thus I willed it" theme that's so important in Nietzsche. I haven't read the book since then (2004), as I'm quite happy to keep tne impression I have of it. It would be an interesting exercise, though, to read it again, now that other, non-Rortyian ideas have come to dominate my thinking.
  • (5/5)
    Surely you know the plot by now. As a Hindu this book speaks to me - it signifies the struggle to stay gentle and vegatarian and maintain my humanity. Though I'm not a Hindu any more. It still speaks to me. And I'm still vegatarian.
  • (2/5)
    To me Life of Pi is a mixed bag of several things... I don't know. I kind of enjoyed the adventure, but personally didn't care about the religious side of the story (specifically the first part of the book was a total nonsense to me). I didn't like the last part, either. I'm still trying to figure out what to make of it. I think this is one of those books that you either love or hate. I can't say I hate it (I'm giving it a "it was OK" rating, and like I said, I kind of enjoyed the adventure), but I would say that it is way overrated (maybe because of the movie?) and surrounded by a mysticism that I really don't get.
  • (3/5)
    This was one of the books I read on my travels the last couple of months (plane trips from Wilmington to New York & LA)I'd seen the trailer for the film "Life of Pi" and asked my daughter if it was all about a boy in a lifeboat with a tiger. She said, pretty much.And so it is. Pi (short for Piscine, which means swimming pool--something I still remember from high school French) lives an idyllic life in India, with his parents, older brother and all the animals in his family's zoo. He grows up around animals and develops a keen understanding of how animals relate to each other and more importantly, how human beings should relate to animals.The beginning of the novel is Pi's spiritual quest. He dives into religion as if it were a buffet. He wants it all and declares himself to be a Christian, a Hindu and a Muslim, and refusing to budge on choosing one over the others.Then his father decides to move the family to Canada. He finds buyers for the animals, books passage on a ship and with his family, accompanies the animals across the ocean to North America. Of course, the ship sinks, leaving Pi as the only human survivor. He shares his boat with a number of animals, including an orangutang and a hyena, but this being a beast eat beast world, it comes down to Pi and a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.It took me a while to figure out that Richard Parker was the tiger's name and not a person.And so it goes for the rest of the book. Pi keeping himself and Richard Parker alive. Finding food, finding water, all the while maintaining his alpha position in the world that is the lifeboat.It drags in parts and I feel kind of cheated that the author implies that it really happened (it didn't). But on the whole, it gave me a lot to think about.
  • (5/5)
    A must-read. A truly good read and a book that will make you understand religion as it is.
  • (5/5)
    An unforgettable account of an extraordinairy journey of a shipwrecked young lad who takes a trip with a Tiger. Read it to see what i mean.
  • (4/5)
    It started off very slowly and took a bit of time to get down to the real story. The scene was set in a lengthy style which did seem to go on. But when the adventures started it was a really enjoyable read. The world of Pi on the Lifeboat was captivating and the ending was intriguing and thoughtful, making you think about views of the world and how life and the world around should be seen. Not sure if I would look into any more books by this author though, as although enjoyable there were several rough patches.
  • (4/5)
    Family of zookeepers embark on an ill-fated cruise after deciding to move from India to Canada. Tragically the cargo ship they’re on sinks unexpectedly overnight somewhere in the middle of Pacific. All that’s left of their dreams and hopes is one lifeboat with the youngest boy, 16-year old Pi, and some unusual companions of his ordeal...This shipwreck survival story turned out to be a very interesting and surprising one for me. If I’m perfectly honest, during the course of reading it, I had quite mixed feelings at times. The book was reading quite well overall, but the first 100 pages seemed to drag a little and there were couple of moments later on in the book that left me a bit confused and lost. The final chapters however proved excellent and were actually incredibly touching while shedding more light on the tragic events. Altogether a good read, would recommend to others.
  • (4/5)
    entertaining first section, exciting second section, and thought provoking finale
  • (5/5)
    Martel's story of 16 year-old Pi Patel is one that borders on the incredulous. Set adrift on a lifeboat lost in the Pacfic, with a few zoo animals as companions, including a Bengal Tiger, we journey through the depths of hell and rise to the peaks of bliss as we live Pi's story. Crafted with superb language and mastery, the reader will be fascinated during this reading and quite possibly transformed as well. More than an adventure story in the fashion of Robinson Crusoe or Pincher Martin, this is a story with a twist, and Martel delivers with credibility.
  • (5/5)
    I confess that I needed to read some reviews which talked about the meaning of the book in order to begin to appreciate it. I knew while reading that this is a classic. The imagination in it is fantastic. I thought it surely must be an allegory, but I was busy trying to figure out how it would end and missed the journey. The story did evoke the feeling within me that there are highs and lows in life and that persevering in faith is what is important to me. There were several disgusting parts that I could have done without, but they did make it clear how deep Pi's suffering (and his overcoming) was.

    I'm not sure if I want to see the movie. Maybe after I've had time to let this story percolate. It's not one of those books I will forget, I'm pretty sure of that!
  • (5/5)
    Simply put, this is a popular book. Don't let that deter you from reading it. It's an enthralling, epic adventure that will take you far from your everyday surroundings and truly spark your imagination the way that books did when you were a kid. I'd gotten away from reading because so many of the recent offerings failed to really bring me into their pages. I was hoping Life of Pi would mark an end to that drought, and it has. On a personal level, I truly enjoyed the combination of narration and descriptive imagery, color symbolism, and animal behavior. Locations, emotions, interactions all seemed convincing. I really looked forward to reading this every night.I'll be suggesting this book to quite a few fellow book lovers.
  • (5/5)
    One of those books everyone read, which means I should have avoided it but I love books about the sea. I would have to say this is one of my favourite books: full of wonder, clever meta narrative and page-turning freak outs.
  • (3/5)
    The book begins with an Indian boy’s judicious questioning of the world’s many religions. Although his penetrations leave no stone unturned and no religion unblemished, he admits to loving them all. “Love is hard to believe, ask any lover. Life is hard to believe, ask any scientist. God is hard to believe, ask any believer.” His only truly derisive jab is at the throats of the agnostics. “I felt a kinship with him. It was my first clue that atheists are brothers and sisters of a different faith, and every word they speak speaks of faith. Like me, they go as far as the legs of reason will carry them – and then they leap ... I’ll be honest about it. It is not atheists that stick in my craw, it’s agnostics. Doubt is useful for a while. We all must pass through the garden of Gethsemane. If Christ played with doubt, so must we ... but we must move on. To choose doubt as a philosophy of life is akin to choosing immobility as a means of transportation.” Then, suddenly the story (and writing) shifts dramatically and we alarmingly find ourselves within a new world (and book) aboard a lifeboat with Pi and a 450 pound Bengal tiger – a position only Siegfried and Roy would welcome, and I imagine Roy now having second thoughts. The third book of the novel brings it all together and correlates the seemingly disparate plotlines, but not before a surprising ending. I don’t believe it is the never-ending story that the author wished it to be (3.1415 ...), but no regrets.
  • (4/5)
    Knowing only that this novel has been incredibly popular and that some have claimed that it is proof of God’s existence, it has been on my “must read” list for a number of years. And so I finally read it. I was prepared to read a rousing adventure story of an Indian boy’s survival in the Pacific Ocean aboard a life boat he shares with a Bengal tiger. And in this respect, the book supplies abundant rewards. Martel is a magnificent storyteller. He creates remarkably genuine characters, and he relates events in seamlessly beautiful, artistic prose that is at once clear, stunning, and sublime. What I was not prepared for, however, was the postmodern metafictional nature of this narrative. Although it may not become apparent until the very end of the novel, when Pi tells his incredible story of survival to a couple of Japanese government employees, Martel’s novel is all about the creation of story—about the ability of language to construct “truth” from mere words:Isn’t telling about something—using words, English or Japanese—already something of an invention? Isn’t looking upon this world already something of an invention? (p. 302)As Martel implies, nothing is true or real until language legitimizes it. The novel itself is a construction of embedded narratives—it begins with Martel (or a Martel-like narrator) telling of his encounter with a man who directs him to Pi, who then tells his story to the narrator—who in turn relates it to the reader. For a portion of the novel (the first quarter of it), the narrator weaves his voice together with Pi’s and tells the story of how Pi told him his story. And the novel ends with the Japanese agents’ rendition of their meeting with Pi, during which he tells them two vastly different versions of his story.All of this meditation on the nature of narrative and story prompts me to reflect on the way in which I read this novel—as I read it, I was looking for evidence that this novel was about the existence of God, the meaning of faith, etc. What I found instead was a very well-written and entertaining adventure story that—like the subject of religion (which is surely present in the novel)—serves as an extended metaphor for a much broader theme: the eternal question of epistemological uncertainty and the various ways we choose to cope with that uncertainty.