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The Sign of the Beaver

The Sign of the Beaver

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The Sign of the Beaver

évaluations:
4/5 (66 évaluations)
Longueur:
129 pages
2 heures
Sortie:
Apr 27, 1983
ISBN:
9780547348704
Format:
Livre

Description

A 1984 Newbery Honor Book

Although he faces responsibility bravely, thirteen-year-old Matt is more than a little apprehensive when his father leaves him alone to guard their new cabin in the wilderness. When a renegade white stranger steals his gun, Matt realizes he has no way to shoot game or to protect himself. When Matt meets Attean, a boy in the Beaver clan, he begins to better understand their way of life and their growing problem in adapting to the white man and the changing frontier.

Elizabeth George Speare’s Newbery Honor-winning survival story is filled with wonderful detail about living in the wilderness and the relationships that formed between settlers and natives in the 1700s. Now with an introduction by Joseph Bruchac.

Sortie:
Apr 27, 1983
ISBN:
9780547348704
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

"I was born in Melrose, Massachusetts, on November 21, 1908. I have lived all my life in New England, and though I love to travel I can't imagine ever calling any other place on earth home. Since I can't remember a time when I didn't intend to write, it is hard to explain why I took so long getting around to it in earnest. But the years seemed to go by very quickly. In 1936 I married Alden Speare and came to Connecticut. Not till both children were in junior high did I find time at last to sit down quietly with a pencil and paper. I turned naturally to the things which had filled my days and thoughts and began to write magazine articles about family living. Then one day I stumbled on a true story from New England history with a character who seemed to me an ideal heroine. Though I had my first historical novel almost by accident it soon proved to be an absorbing hobby." Elizabeth George Speare (1908-1994) won the 1959 Newbery Medal for THE WITCH OF BLACKBIRD POND, and the 1962 Newbery Medal for THE BRONZE BOW. She also received a Newbery Honor Award in 1983, and in 1989 she was presented with the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for her substantial and enduring contribution to children’s literature.

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The Sign of the Beaver - Elizabeth George Speare

Chapter 1

Matt stood at the edge of the clearing for some time after his father had gone out of sight among the trees. There was just a chance that his father might turn back, that perhaps he had forgotten something or had some last word of advice. This was one time Matt reckoned he wouldn’t mind the advice, no matter how many times he had heard it before. But finally he had to admit that this was not going to happen. His father had really gone. He was alone, with miles of wilderness stretching on every side.

He turned and looked back at the log house. It was a fair house, he thought; his mother would have no cause to be ashamed of it. He had helped to build every inch of it. He had helped to cut down the spruce trees and haul the logs and square and notch them. He had stood at one end of every log and raised it, one on top of the other, fitting the notched ends together as snugly as though they had grown that way. He had climbed the roof to fasten down the cedar splints with long poles, and dragged up pine boughs to cover them. Behind the cabin were the mounds of corn he had helped to plant, the green blades already shooting up, and the pumpkin vines just showing between the stumps of trees.

If only it were not so quiet. He had been alone before. His father had often gone into the forest to hunt, for hours on end. Even when he was there, he was not much of a talker. Sometimes they had worked side by side through a whole morning without his speaking a single word. But this silence was different. It coiled around Matt and reached into his stomach to settle there in a hard knot.

He knew it was high time his father was starting back. This was part of the plan that the family had worked out together in the long winter of 1768, sitting by lamplight around the pine table back in Massachusetts. His father had spread out the surveyor’s map and traced the boundaries of the land he had purchased in Maine territory. They would be the first settlers in a new township. In the spring, when the ice melted, Matt and his father would travel north. They would take passage on a ship to the settlement at the mouth of the Penobscot River. There they would find some man with a boat to take them up the river and then on up a smaller river that branched off from it, many days’ distance from the settlement. Finally they would strike out on foot into the forest and claim their own plot of land. They would clear a patch of ground, build a cabin, and plant some corn. In the summer his father would go back to Massachusetts to fetch his mother and sister and the new baby, who would be born while they were gone. Matt would stay behind and guard the cabin and the corn patch.

It hadn’t been quite so easy as it had sounded back in their house in Quincy. Matt had had to get used to going to sleep at night with every muscle in his body aching. But the log house was finished. It had only one room. Before winter they would add a loft for him and his sister to sleep in. Inside there were shelves along one wall and a sturdy puncheon table with two stools. One of these days, his father promised, he would cut out a window and fasten oiled paper to let in the light. Someday the paper would be replaced with real glass. Against the wall was a chimney of smaller logs, daubed and lined with clay from the creek. This too was a temporary structure. Over and over his father had warned Matt that it wasn’t as safe as a stone chimney and that he had to watch out for flying sparks. He needn’t fear. After all the work of building this house, Matt wasn’t going to let it burn down about his ears.

Six weeks, his father had said that morning. "Maybe seven. Hard to reckon exactly. With your ma and sister we’ll have slow going, specially with the new little one.

You may lose track of the weeks, he had added. Easy thing to do when you’re alone. Might be well to make notches on a stick, seven notches to a stick. When you get to the seventh stick you can start looking for us.

A silly thing to do, Matt thought, as though he couldn’t count the weeks for himself. But he wouldn’t argue about it, not on the last morning.

Then his father reached up to a chink in the log wall and took down the battered tin box that held his watch and his compass and a few silver coins. He took out the big silver watch.

Every time you cut a notch, he said, remember to wind this up at the same time.

Matt took the watch in his hand as gently as if it were a bird’s egg. You aim to leave it, Pa? he asked.

It belonged to your grandpa. Would’ve belonged to you anyhow sooner or later. Might as well be now.

You mean—it’s mine?

Aye, it’s yourn. Be kind of company, hearing it tick.

The lump in Matt’s throat felt as big as the watch. This was the finest thing his father had ever possessed.

I’ll take care of it, he managed finally.

Aye. I knowed you would. Mind you don’t wind it up too tight.

Then, just before he left, his father had given him a second gift. Thinking of it, Matt walked back into the cabin and looked up at his father’s rifle, hanging on two pegs over the door.

I’ll take your old blunderbuss with me, his father had said. This one aims truer. But mind you, don’t go banging away at everything that moves. Wait till you’re dead sure. There’s plenty of powder if you don’t waste it.

It was the first sign he had given that he felt uneasy about leaving Matt here alone. Matt wished now that he could have said something to reassure his father, instead of standing there tongue-tied. But if he had the chance again, he knew he wouldn’t do any better. They just weren’t a family to put things into words.

He reached up and took down the rifle. It was lighter than his old matchlock, the one his father had carried away with him in exchange. This was a fine piece, the walnut stock as smooth and shining as his mother’s silk dress. It was a mite long, but it had a good balance. With this gun he wouldn’t need to waste powder. So it wouldn’t hurt to take one shot right now, just to try the feel of it.

He knew his father always kept that rifle as clean as a new-polished spoon. But because he enjoyed handling it, Matt poked about in the touchhole with the metal pick. From the powder horn he shook a little of the black powder into the pan. Then he took one lead bullet out of the pouch, wrapped it in a patch of cloth, and rammed it into the barrel. As he worked, he whistled loudly into the stillness. It made the knot in his stomach loosen a little.

As he stepped into the woods, a bluejay screeched a warning. So it was some time before he spotted anything to shoot at. Presently he saw a red squirrel hunched on a branch, with its tail curled up behind its ears. He lifted the rifle and sighted along the barrel, minding his father’s advice and waiting till he was dead sure.

The clean feel of the shot delighted him. It didn’t set him back on his heels like his old matchlock. Still, he hadn’t quite got the knack of it. He caught the flick of a tail as the squirrel scampered to an upper branch.

I could do better with my own gun, he thought. This rifle of his father’s was going to take some getting used to.

Ruefully he trudged back to the cabin. For his noon meal he sat munching a bit of the johnnycake his father had baked that morning. Already he was beginning to realize that time was going to move slowly. A whole afternoon to go before he could cut that first notch.

Seven sticks. That would be August. He would have a birthday before August. He supposed his father had forgotten that, with so many things on his mind. By the time his family got here, he would be thirteen years old.

Chapter 2

By the next morning the tight place in his stomach was gone. By the morning after that Matt decided that it was mighty pleasant living alone. He enjoyed waking to a day stretched before him to fill as he pleased. He could set himself the necessary chores without having to listen to any advice about how they should be done. How could he have thought that the time would move slowly? As the days passed and he cut one notch after another on his stick, Matt discovered that there was never time enough for all that must be done between sunrise and sunset.

Although the cabin was finished, his father had left him the endless task of chinking the spaces between the logs with clay from the creek bank. At the edge of the clearing there were trees to fell to let in more sun on the growing corn, and underbrush that kept creeping closer over the cleared ground. All this provided plenty of wood to be chopped and stacked in

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4.2
66 évaluations / 32 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    This book is about a boy who is in the forest and he meets this indian.
  • (3/5)
    this is a exiting book. A boy gets left alone because his dad has to get his wife and dahter for the new home
  • (4/5)
    Read this as a read aloud a few months ago. My daughter and I enjoyed this book: the adventures were exciting, and we found we learned quite a bit about trying to forge a living out in the woods. Makes you appreciate the conveniences we have, like heat and a change of clothes.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite children's books. It provides an appreciation for basic survival skills, but also helps question values and assumptions about relationships between different people groups.
  • (3/5)
    Not Very Great.
  • (5/5)
    It was a must read when I was growing up, part of our school curriculum, and it is still as touching to me today as it was amazing back then. When I was younger this was a story about living in another time, practically in another world from my own, where children were left on their own to hunt and fend for themselves and no one thought twice of it. A world of living with Native Americans before there were too many whites to influence the culture and interfere with the culture of the tribes. As an adult, it is a story about the comparisons between the two cultures, reflecting how each is similar and how each struggle is fought in different ways by boys who are at the age where they're ready to make their own way in the world, but still young enough to be learning a little more about what life means in the process.A short story and quick read, this book is filled with enough adventure to keep any reader happy and has enough emotion to turn any heart soft for just a little while. A classic story of a time lost to us that shouldn't be forgotten.
  • (3/5)
    I believe the teen chews tree sap instead of gum? This blew my mind. I tried it, but either did something terribly wrong or I'm just not 'core enough.
  • (5/5)
    I read this book aloud to my children. It has won several literary awards, including: 1984 Newbery Honor, 1984 Scott O'Dell Award, and 1988 Rebecca Caudill Young Reader's Book Award Nominee.Wow, what an adventure! I love survival stories like this.The story takes place in 1769 and involves a 12 year-old boy named Matt. Matt's father has bought land in a new township in Maine, and the two of them have been building their new log-cabin home as well as planting crops. Matt's mother, sister, and new baby stayed behind in Massachusetts while the "men" got things set-up for the family's permanent move to Maine.During the summer of 1769, Matt's father makes the trek back to Massachusetts to bring the rest of the family to the new home in Maine. It is expected that it will take six to seven weeks, round-trip. Matt is left in charge of the home and crops in Maine, with his father's rifle for both protection and hunting.There is much work to be done tending to the crops and chinking the spaces between the logs of the cabin. Matt works hard, and he keeps himself busy to help pass the time while he is alone. Of course, he experiences some adventures along the way! He makes friends with the local Beaver tribe, who initially are very hesitant to trust a "white" boy.August, the time for Matt's family to arrive, comes and goes. Autumn passes, and soon it is winter. The chief of the local Beaver tribe tells Matt that they intend to leave the area and travel north to follow the moose. The tribe worries that something has happened to Matt's family and fear that they will not return now that it is already winter. They invite Matt to come with them, and the chief lovingly promises to treat Matt as his own blood. It is a heartbreaking moment, and Matt must decide whether to try to brave the harsh winter completely alone and isolated or go with the Beaver tribe where he will be safe. What would you do?We loved this story! This is one of those books where my kids actually begged, "Just one more chapter, please?" It was hard for even me to put down, and it took a lot of discipline to keep my own hands away from the book and not read ahead!This is a fantastic book to read with your kids, and I highly recommend it! This would also be a perfect choice for someone who is a reluctant reader.MY RATING: 5 stars!! We loved it!!
  • (5/5)
    How cultures can learn from one another, how survival is taught, how friendships are made. Matt and Attean have quite a bit to discover about each other, their cultures, how they can interact, and themselves.
  • (4/5)
    Even as a young adult who had never read this work before, I definitely enjoyed The Sign of the Beaver. It was a welcome change from the children's wilderness literature to which I am accustomed, since it takes a different route from the usual "dropped into the wilderness with no supplies" story line. Matt and his father have already settled a piece of land by the time the story begins, and so it was interesting to see how the author depicted the ways in which a young settler, rather than a hopelessly lost and previously urban teenager, would work to survive when left alone in the wilderness. Speare creates a landscape and characters that are detailed enough to make the story easy to picture, but not so detailed that they bog the reader down and leave him or her mired in names, places, and relationships, which makes this a quick, pleasant read, perfect for filling up an hour or two of free time.One aspect of the story that I really appreciated was its potential for helping children understand the importance of questioning the messages hidden in things that they see, hear, or read. Upon meeting Native Americans and building relationships with them, Matt begins to become aware of the "white superiority" messages hidden in his favourite book, Robinson Crusoe, and reflects on the ways in which those messages may or may not actually apply in real life. This could make the book a useful tool for parents and teachers who want to encourage children to evaluate the truth of the things that they read, especially since, in the story, the reading of Robinson Crusoe and Matt's questioning of the validity of the text's message about Native peoples both occur within a few pages, solidifying the connection between them.With that said, I think it worth it to add a few words of caution to anyone who, like me, has never picked up this book before and wants to read it for the first time as an older reader. First, it is such a quick read that one can reach the end without feeling like anything has really been read, and the story can seem a bit bland because, due to the length of the story, the characters and the relationships between them grow and change very rapidly, to the point where it sometimes seems unrealistic (for example, a deep dislike can become open friendliness after a single small deed is done). Second, especially towards the end of the story, Speare devotes a lot of space to descriptions of various things that Matt does around the house, which can become a bit tedious if one is not fascinated by that kind of thing. Finally, Speare's attempts to emphasize Matt's growing understanding of the Native Americans and their way of life, as well as his growing awareness of the situation that the arrival of white men creates for the Native Americans, can sometimes be so glaringly obvious that they almost seem silly to an older reader who understands from the start that that will be the "moral of the story."However, all of my mild criticisms come from the fact that the book was intended for children, and so I highly recommend it to readers of that age group, who will likely enjoy the characters' rapid changes and be at least mildly impressed by the positive message presented in the text, as well as older readers who do not mind reading a pretty predictable (but still quite pleasant) short story.
  • (4/5)
    Matt is in charge of caring for his house and growing corn while his family is gone. He starts out well, but as time goes on and his father doesn't return, he finds life more and more difficult. He develops a friendship with Attean, a local Native American boy, who teaches him what he needs to know to survive far from others and without his family, but he doesn't earn Attean's respect until he chooses to wait for his family instead of going to the hunt with Attean's tribe.
  • (4/5)
    Matt and his father have been working hard to prepare their homestead in Maine for the arrival of Matt's mother and sister. Now, Matt's father must make the long journey back to Massachusetts to fetch them -- and Matt must stay and take care of the cabin and the crops. When Matt's gun is stolen by a sketchy trapper who happens by, he worries how he will get along without the ability to hunt. He sees a lot of fish in his future! When Matt gets into trouble with a swarm of angry bees, a Native American man Saknis and his grandson Attean come to Matt's rescue. In gratitude, Matt offers them one of his prized possessions: a copy of Robinson Crusoe -- but the Native Americans do not know how to read English. Matt agrees to teach Attean to read. At first, Matt and Attean do not get along very well, but over time they come to understand one another better. When winter comes and Matt's family has still not arrived, Matt must make a difficult decision: will he keep waiting at the cabin, or will he travel with Attean and his tribe? What if Matt's father never comes?This is a gripping story, but it has many problematic aspects, particularly in its treatment of Native American culture. Some of the author's word choices are especially poor -- Attean and his grandfather tend to speak in "grunts," women are sometimes referred to as "squaws," and when Matt observes a ceremonial dance, he compares it mentally to a clowing routine. On the other hand, by the end of the novel, Matt has come to a greater appreciation of Native Americans, recognizing that they have taught him how to survive is the wild and have extended hospitality and friendship to him, and there is a sense that he regrets the fact that the Native American hunting grounds will soon be full of white settlers. Matt's nuanced character development is probably what earned this book its Newbery Honor, but it isn't enough to offset the problematic attitudes inherent in the book, and I'd have a hard time recommending this book to young readers of today.I listened to the audiobook version, and was not particularly impressed. The author has a tendency to use too much emphasis, a delivery that comes across as forceful and distracting to me.
  • (4/5)
    This is the story of two young boys, one white and one Native American, who rely on each other in order to survive in the wilderness.
  • (5/5)
    The Sighn of the Beaver is about a boy named Matt who is left alone in the woods, his father and him build a log house there where matt would stay in for a few months. Matt's father leaves, to pick up Matt's mother, sister, and new born baby sister, now Matt is alone with only his dad's rifle. This rifle is eventually stolen a few days later by a random hunter, how will Matt hunt for food now? Later Matt meets an Indian who rescues him from a swarm of bees, the Indian is named Attean. Matt and Attean make a deal: Matt would teach Attean how to read while Attean would get food for Matt he has no rifle. Attean also teaches Matt how to hunt with traps, how make a fish hook, and how to make/ use a bow and arrow. Months go by and his family is still not here, and winter is almost here. Since winter is almost here Attean has to leave, Attean offers Matt if he would like to come with him to go hunt, but Matt says no hoping that his parents will come back soon. Will Matt's parents come back soon or will Matt be in the freezing cold all by himself?I give the book, The Sign of the Beaver ***** because it is interesting and has lots of action/ adventure. I really like how Matt is left alone in the woods and has to try to survive by himself with no gun. I thought it was nice of Attean to hunt food for Matt while Matt teaches Attean how to read. I also thought it was nice of Attean to teach Matt how to hunt by himself without a gun, how to make a fish hook, and how to use/ make a bow and arrow. I recomend this book to everyone, it will keep you excited from all of the action/ adventures. I hope to read another on of Elizabeth Spheare's books one day. You can really understand the theme and plot of this book. Who doesn't like books with action, care, and excitement.
  • (2/5)
    When I read this book at a much younger age, I adored it. Let's be real, I probably had an unrealistic crush on the fictional Attean. Tall, dark, handsome, strong, intelligent, good with hands... ;)

    Alright, alright so he is 14 in this book, but I was merely a young lass enamored with the idea of a gorgeous Native American boy to sweep me off my feet.


    Now about the book itself... It is an easy read for 2nd-5th graders, I would say. It doesn't teach much but the plot is catching enough that young readers would devour it. A young boy's father leaves him alone in a cabin surrounded by nothing but forest while he returns to Quincy, Maine to retrieve his wife and child. In his absence, Matt [boy] meets Attean [Indian] and against all odds, they become friends. As things progress, he is invited to join the tribe in their move West. Does he abandon the cabin he's guarded for almost a year or does he wait for his family's return? *cue dramatic music* You'll just have to read it to find out!

    What I don't like is the inconsistent writing. The author used very ridiculous speech for the Indians. "Me Attean. We no like white man. White man words bad". She gives the boy's father a type of hybrid old-english-southern-alabama accent, while Matt's is plain ol' english. At times, she uses modern slang such as : "the village was awesome" and "now it looks lame".

  • (4/5)
    Excellent read aloud especially during the Native American 4th grade unit.
  • (4/5)
    The year is 1768. A man and his twelve year old son have traveled to the territory of Maine to start a new farmstead. Now that the land has been selected and the cabin built, the man heads back to fetch his wife and daughter, leaving his son alone to till their field and protect their cabin. Can the boy survive the six weeks alone? Well, we never know, because he's befriended by neighboring Indians who help him survive and lead him to discover not only their culture but a few things about himself as well. "The Sign of the Beaver" is a nice tale, centering on the relationship between Matt, the English boy, and Attean, a native one. It's chock full of information about the lifestyle of the local people (Penobscots, I think, but the book's a bit unclear on that point) and the English settlers. Definitely a book to let your kids check out so you can sneak a peek at it as well.--J.
  • (4/5)
    A review by Blake: A good book. Surprises around a lot of the corners. The ending was really good. Some of it was kinda sad though.
  • (5/5)
    It's the mid-1700s and Matt and his father have built a cabin in the Maine wilderness. His father must go back and bring the rest of the family back to their new home, leaving Matt on his own to look after their property and crop. Matt soon learns it's not easy to take care of yourself and an Indian comes to his rescue. A deal is made with the man and Matt agrees to teach the Indian's grandson to read the white man's scratching in exchange for food. As the story progresses Matt learns more from the Indians than the boy learns from him. Matt's father also does not come back as the months go by.A wonderfully, beautiful story of friendship between two people of different cultures. Matt's misconceptions of the Indians are challenged as he learns a new way of living. The Indian boy is disdainful of the white boy who does squaw work and doesn't know how to do anything. A bond slowly grows between the boys as they learn from each other and prejudices are set aside.This is not a plot driven story but more of a slow moving story of two people and their cultures. I've read this about three times now and both my older son and the 8yo really were riveted with the storytelling. Speare is a writer who writes beautiful language and weaves a tale that really makes the reader (or listener :-) care deeply for the characters. I think this book will especially be appreciated by boys and I recommend it wholeheartedly to everyone. A favourite!
  • (5/5)
    This classic tale by Elizabeth George Speare outlines a young boy, Matt, left to fend for himself on his family's new homestead. When he has a scary accident, nearby Indians intervene to help him and exchange a trade for his knowledge of reading. In the end, however, he is more enriched by the agreement, as he learns how to live in harmony with the land through the example of his new pupil, another boy around his age. The themes of coming-of-age as well as race relations are explored in a sensitive, profound way. I will admit I shed a tear at the end, as well! Great for kids ages 8-13.
  • (4/5)
    Similar in feel to most "Indian captive" style stories (though this wasn't one). I enjoyed watching the boys' burgeoning acceptance of each other, gradual friendship, and eventual brotherhood (I don't really see this as being worth a spoiler alert, as it's par for the course for these types of YA stories). I'd like to know how well the culture of the tribe was portrayed in this, but really can't be bothered to do my own research.
  • (5/5)
    In this book, it had a lot of interesting facts, like how to survive by yourself. and other things like what to eat. This book by Elizabeth Speare is mostly full of suspense and action out in nature. The main character named Matt, can almost be tied to a writer named Thoroue. They both loved the outdoors and loved to discover different types of things. Like how animals react to different types of weather, and new concepts when other animals that live around them. Matt soon met this young Native American that was about his age too. He showed Matt new things that he dint know about, and then soon Matt moved in with him. I recommend this book to a lot of people that love nature, like me. It is full of suspense and has a lot of interesting facts.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book with my class at school. And my teacher really did a good job by helping us understand what the author was trying yo say. Books can mean more than a story, they are lessons of life in words, and this book is an amazing example of that. Most people think a friend is someone you've known for long time even if you don't know who they really are in the inside. But I think that in this book both Matt and Attean learn that you can't have a real friendship without trust or respect. This is true because in the beginning, when Matt and Attean first mat they had no trust, respect, or friendship what so ever. They both didn't like each others cultures and as a result, didn't like each other. I think that they were to prejudice and that everyone should at least get to know who the person is before judging them. Attean didn't want to take reading lessons because he didn't want to read but also because it was by Matt and he was white but also because he didn't want to admit Matt was more educated then he was. When Attean gave Matt a rabbit for his half of the treaty and Matt said that there was no hole, Attean offered to teach him how to make snare, instead of a gun or arrow. Matt was excited and astonished by Attean's knowledge and he respected that, and Attean respected Matt now. Now, their friendship had begun. When Matt saved Attean's dog from the white man's metal trap Attean tried not to show how grateful and happy he was, but he didn't trick Matt. They each trusted each other now, and are like best friends, or even more, like Attean said, brothers. This is why, you can't have a real, true friendship without either trust or respect.
  • (5/5)
    The Sign of the Beaver is a wonderful story set in early America, about a young man watching over his family's new cabin while his father is away for the summer. The summer goes by slowly at first, but after two thefts by man and beast, hunger leads young Matthew into a dangerous encounter, and subsequent rescue by a native American. Through his interactions with a youth from the local Beaver tribe, he becomes more self-sufficient, and grows in maturity.This is a sweet, interesting coming-of-age story by an author who has not disappointed me in the past. Very much recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Loved it. Quick easy read. Great story. I def recommend.
  • (5/5)
    I loved the way Matt got in a good relationship with the Indians and how he earned their respect the ending is great and I would recommend it to anyone who likes reading adventure and about Indians not to mention a little suspense!
  • (5/5)
    The friendship and the bond between the two boys and their differences and similarities don’t get in the way of how much they are like brothers
  • (5/5)
    It is so interesting, Amazing!!!
    I mean it was super fun
  • (5/5)
    It was interesting and fun.I like the hunting and the setting. I also like Matts friendship with Attean. Its sad that Matt lost is baby brother.
  • (5/5)
    Very good book!