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Dear Dad, Love Laurie

Dear Dad, Love Laurie

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Dear Dad, Love Laurie

évaluations:
3.5/5 (2 évaluations)
Longueur:
118 pages
1 heure
Sortie:
Mar 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781497681927
Format:
Livre

Description

After her father moves away, Laurie sends her love by mail

The scariest thing Laurie has ever seen is a half-empty house, which she discovered the day her dad moved away. The divorce was a long time coming, but that didn’t make it hurt any less. To stay in touch with her father, Laurie’s mom forces her to write him a letter each week, keeping him updated on everything from quizzes and tests to parties and boys. At first, the letters are a chore, a painful reminder that Dad isn’t around anymore, but with every stamp she licks, Laurie finds herself growing up just a little bit more.
 
This remarkable novel, told entirely through Laurie’s letters to her father, is a powerful story of divorce and renewal that proves it’s not impossible to love someone from afar.

Sortie:
Mar 3, 2015
ISBN:
9781497681927
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Susan Beth Pfeffer is the author of many books for teens, including the New York Times best-selling novel Life As We Knew It, which was nominated for several state awards, and its companion books, The Dead and the Gone, This World We Live In, and The Shade of the Moon. She lives in Middletown, New York.


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Aperçu du livre

Dear Dad, Love Laurie - Susan Beth Pfeffer

cousins

June 24

Dear Dad,

Mom says I have to write to you at least once a week, now that you’ve moved so far away.

I don’t think that’s fair.

Love,

Laurie

June 29

Dear Dad,

Mom says that I have to write to you before I go to summer camp. I don’t know what she expects me to write. School ended. Being in fifth grade was okay. I’m glad I’m going to be going to middle school next year. I guess summer camp will be okay. I had a good time there last year, even if you and Mom had just split up. In summer camp, maybe they won’t make me write to you.

Love,

Laurie

July 6

Dear Dad,

It isn’t fair. I was just getting ready to write to you when the counselor said we all had to write to our mothers. I said I was writing to my father instead, and the counselor (her name is Moira and she has three big pimples, one on each cheek and one in the middle of her chin) said she didn’t care, I had to write to my mother too. I said it was my mother who made me write to my father, and Moira said she didn’t care if the Queen of England made me write to my father; as long as I was sleeping in the Robin cabin, and she was the counselor, I was going to write to my mother.

So I had to stop the letter I was writing to you, and write a postcard to Mom instead.

I asked Mom before I left camp whether I had to write to you all summer long and she said yes, absolutely, the way she does. But I bet she didn’t realize I was going to have to write to her too.

Darin Greenburg, (she’s in the bunk next to mine and the reason her name is Darin is because her parents made it up. I think it’s pretty) has parents who are still married, and she only has to write one postcard and they both get it. She says she likes writing letters. She said she’d write my letters for me if I’d pay her, but Mom didn’t give me enough money.

Love,

Laurie

July 15

Dear Dad,

This weekend was parents’ weekend, and Mom came up to visit. Lots of other kids got homesick when they saw their parents, but I didn’t cry once.

Both of Darin Greenburg’s parents came, but lots of the other kids only had one parent. Some kids had a mother and a stepfather, and a few had a mother and a stepfather and a stepmother and a father.

Darin told me she was jealous of the kids who had lots of extra parents. She said it’s real hard when you’re stuck with a mother and a father and they’re still married. They make her do all her homework on time, and she doesn’t get any extra presents or go interesting places during vacation (except her parents took her and her little brother to Disney World last year).

I liked it when you and Mom were still married, but I guess you did make me do my homework.

Love,

Laurie

July 23

Dear Dad,

Thank you for my package!!! I loved everything in it!!!! How did you know I wanted a poster of Ross Perlman? He’s my absolute favorite. Moira said I could hang it up by my bunk just as long as I didn’t use Scotch tape. But she had masking tape, so I used that instead. Everyone in my cabin loves Ross Perlman and they all think it’s neat my father sent me the poster.

Darin Greenburg says the only thing she ever gets from her father is books. It’s a good thing too. I already finished all the books I brought, so I’ve been swapping with her. Sometimes we read instead of going to archery. I hate archery.

I also loved all the fudge you sent, and I shared it with everyone just the way you told me to (you could practically see new pimples pop out on Moira), and the magazines (everyone read Teen Dreamboat at least twice), and I especially loved the map of Missouri.

Why did your father send you a map of Missouri? Darin asked.

Because that’s where he lives now, so I can see what the state looks like, I said right back.

Moira says she never met anybody who lived in Missouri, but she bets it’s real boring there. I hope her teeth fall out from eating too much fudge.

Love,

Laurie

July 31

Dear Dad,

We had races in swimming today and I came in third twice and second once. And in archery, I hit a bull’s-eye only it was in someone else’s target.

Darin Greenburg says she’s had enough of camp already and can’t wait to go home, but I kind of like it. We’re going to camp out this weekend, and have a bonfire and tell ghost stories and roast marshmallows. Moira says she knows a ghost story so scary none of us’ll sleep that night, but I think she’s making that up.

Jamie Reilly (she’s in my cabin too) has been going to camp for years now and she says it always rains when you’re going to have a camp-out. She says she was camping out once and it rained so hard the rain put the fire out. She says nothing tastes worse than wet marshmallows.

Does it rain a lot in Missouri?

Love,

Laurie

August 4

Dear Dad,

The camp-out was great. It didn’t rain at all (well, just a little bit and that was after we were in our tents). Moira really did know a scary ghost story. It was all about this dead person who kept coming back to her old school to get revenge on her old teachers. Even Darin liked it.

We sang songs too and played dumb games like Grandmother’s Trunk and we each got to say what was the scariest thing we’d ever seen. Darin said it was her baby brother when they brought him home from the hospital. She says he’s less weird-looking now. Jamie whispered to me that Moira’s pimples were the scariest thing she’d ever seen, but when her turn came, she just said her mother when she was mad.

The scariest thing I ever saw was our apartment after you moved out, but I didn’t want to say that, so I said it was Great-uncle Herbie the time he got all red at the wedding and had a heart attack and everybody thought he was going to die. That took third prize. Jennifer Hughes came in second with her father’s third wife. Lisa Frolich won, but I’m not sure it’s fair. The scariest thing she ever saw was a big truck that hit the car she and her mother were in. Her mother was in the hospital for months. The reason I don’t think it’s fair is because she was only a year and a half old then and I bet she doesn’t really remember what the truck looked like.

I remember Great-uncle Herbie, though. Boy, was he red!

Love,

Laurie

August 10

Dear Dad,

Mom was here again this weekend for the second parents’ weekend. She said she never gets any letters from me.

I said that’s because you make me write letters to Dad, so all I write to you are the postcards Moira makes us all write.

Mom said that made sense to her.

Sometimes I really love her.

Love,

Laurie

August 18

Dear Dad,

Camp ends on Saturday. I’m really sad. I’ve been having a good time. I even like Moira. And Darin and Jamie and I have gotten to be such good friends that I can’t believe I’m not going to see them again.

Darin said I could visit her over Thanksgiving. She says her mother makes a turkey and they have lots of people over, but I said I’d be spending Thanksgiving with you in Missouri. Jamie spends Thanksgiving with her father and stepmother. She says she misses having Thanksgiving with her mother, but she has Christmas with her and New Year’s with her dad. Then she has her birthday with her mother and Easter with her father. Darin says she’s stuck with both parents all the time, but sometimes I think she says stuff like that because she knows we’re jealous of her. Jamie hates her stepmother and she has two stepbrothers and she says they’re really mean.

Our cabin played the Bluebird cabin in softball yesterday and we won 11–10. The Bluebirds thought they should have won but the umpire called two of their runners out when they tried to score so we won instead. I was up seven times and I got three hits and a walk and I struck out twice and grounded out once. One of my hits was a triple.

Lisa Frolich got hit by a pitch and she’s still black-and-blue. She says if she isn’t back to normal by the time school starts, she’s going to sue the camp for millions of dollars. Her mother sued the truck-driver who hit her for millions of dollars and that’s why they’re rich now, but she says her mother’s back hurts all the time and it would be nicer not to be rich and not to be in pain. She says her mother really hurts when it rains.

Darin says her grandmother can tell when it’s going to rain because her rheumatism acts up.

Lots of

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  • (4/5)
    The chapter book “Dear Dad, Love Laurie” by Susan Beth Pferffer is an uplifting and relatable book for students to read. The writing is organized in letter format throughout the whole book but is engaging because they are short and interesting. The letters are full with information about her life but directed towards her dad. “Dear Dad, Love Laurie” is how every letter starts and ends. Also, the book pushes readers to think about divorce and the challenges it brings such as long-distance frustrations, parent arguments, and family problems in general. For example, Laurie’s grandfather dies and since her father is not around she blames it on her dad but quickly forgives him. The big idea in this story is about pushing through hardships of divorce and striving to reach goals.