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Stuart Little

Stuart Little

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Stuart Little

évaluations:
3.5/5 (77 évaluations)
Longueur:
155 pages
1 heure
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Mar 17, 2015
ISBN:
9780062408211
Format:
Livre

Description

The classic story by E. B. White, author of the Newbery Honor Book Charlotte's Web and The Trumpet of the Swan, about one small mouse on a very big adventure.

Now available as an ebook! Illustrations in this ebook appear in vibrant full color on a full-color device and in rich black-and-white on all other devices.

Stuart Little is no ordinary mouse. Born to a family of humans, he lives in New York City with his parents, his older brother George, and Snowbell the cat. Though he's shy and thoughtful, he's also a true lover of adventure.

Stuart's greatest adventure comes when his best friend, a beautiful little bird named Margalo, disappears from her nest. Determined to track her down, Stuart ventures away from home for the very first time in his life. He finds adventure aplenty. But will he find his friend?

Stuart Little joins E. B. White favorites Charlotte's Web and The Trumpet of the Swan as classic illustrated novels that continue to speak to today's readers. Whether you curl up with your young reader to share these books or hand them off for independent reading, you are helping to create what are likely to be all-time favorite reading memories.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Mar 17, 2015
ISBN:
9780062408211
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

E. B. White, the author of such beloved classics as Charlotte's Web, Stuart Little, and The Trumpet of the Swan, was born in Mount Vernon, New York. He graduated from Cornell University in 1921 and, five or six years later, joined the staff of The New Yorker magazine, then in its infancy. He died on October 1, 1985, and was survived by his son and three grandchildren. Mr. White's essays have appeared in Harper's magazine, and some of his other books are: One Man's Meat, The Second Tree from the Corner, Letters of E. B. White, Essays of E. B. White, and Poems and Sketches of E. B. White. He won countless awards, including the 1971 National Medal for Literature and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, which commended him for making a "substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children." During his lifetime, many young readers asked Mr. White if his stories were true. In a letter written to be sent to his fans, he answered, "No, they are imaginary tales . . . But real life is only one kind of life—there is also the life of the imagination."

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Aperçu du livre

Stuart Little - E. B. White

I. In the Drain

WHEN Mrs. Frederick C. Little’s second son arrived, everybody noticed that he was not much bigger than a mouse. The truth of the matter was, the baby looked very much like a mouse in every way. He was only about two inches high; and he had a mouse’s sharp nose, a mouse’s tail, a mouse’s whiskers, and the pleasant, shy manner of a mouse. Before he was many days old he was not only looking like a mouse but acting like one, too—wearing a gray hat and carrying a small cane. Mr. and Mrs. Little named him Stuart, and Mr. Little made him a tiny bed out of four clothespins and a cigarette box.

Unlike most babies, Stuart could walk as soon as he was born. When he was a week old he could climb lamps by shinnying up the cord. Mrs. Little saw right away that the infant clothes she had provided were unsuitable, and she set to work and made him a fine little blue worsted suit with patch pockets in which he could keep his handkerchief, his money, and his keys. Every morning, before Stuart dressed, Mrs. Little went into his room and weighed him on a small scale which was really meant for weighing letters. At birth Stuart could have been sent by first class mail for three cents, but his parents preferred to keep him rather than send him away; and when, at the age of a month, he had gained only a third of an ounce, his mother was so worried she sent for the doctor.

The doctor was delighted with Stuart and said that it was very unusual for an American family to have a mouse. He took Stuart’s temperature and found that it was 98.6, which is normal for a mouse. He also examined Stuart’s chest and heart and looked into his ears solemnly with a flashlight. (Not every doctor can look into a mouse’s ear without laughing.) Everything seemed to be all right, and Mrs. Little was pleased to get such a good report.

Feed him up! said the doctor cheerfully, as he left.

The home of the Little family was a pleasant place near a park in New York City. In the mornings the sun streamed in through the east windows, and all the Littles were up early as a general rule. Stuart was a great help to his parents, and to his older brother George, because of his small size and because he could do things that a mouse can do and was agreeable about doing them. One day when Mrs. Little was washing out the bathtub after Mr. Little had taken a bath, she lost a ring off her finger and was horrified to discover that it had fallen down the drain.

What had I better do? she cried, trying to keep the tears back.

If I were you, said George, I should bend a hairpin in the shape of a fishhook and tie it onto a piece of string and try to fish the ring out with it. So Mrs. Little found a piece of string and a hairpin, and for about a half-hour she fished for the ring; but it was dark down the drain and the hook always seemed to catch on something before she could get it down to where the ring was.

What luck? inquired Mr. Little, coming into the bathroom.

No luck at all, said Mrs. Little. The ring is so far down I can’t fish it up.

Why don’t we send Stuart down after it? suggested Mr. Little. How about it, Stuart, would you like to try?

Yes, I would, Stuart replied, but I think I’d better get into my old pants. I imagine it’s wet down there.

It’s all of that, said George, who was a trifle annoyed that his hook idea hadn’t worked. So Stuart slipped into his old pants and prepared to go down the drain after the ring. He decided to carry the string along with him, leaving one end in charge of his father. When I jerk three times on the string, pull me up, he said. And while Mr. Little knelt in the tub, Stuart slid easily down the drain and was lost to view. In a minute or so, there came three quick jerks on the string, and Mr. Little carefully hauled it up. There, at the end, was Stuart, with the ring safely around his neck.

Oh, my brave little son, said Mrs. Little proudly, as she kissed Stuart and thanked him.

How was it down there? asked Mr. Little, who was always curious to know about places he had never been to.

It was all right, said Stuart.

But the truth was the drain had made him very slimy, and it was necessary for him to take a bath and sprinkle himself with a bit of his mother’s violet water before he felt himself again. Everybody in the family thought he had been awfully good about the whole thing.

II. Home Problems

STUART was also helpful when it came to Ping-pong. The Littles liked Ping-pong, but the balls had a way of rolling under chairs, sofas, and radiators, and this meant that the players were forever stooping down and reaching under things. Stuart soon learned to chase balls, and it was a great sight to see him come out from under a hot radiator, pushing a Ping-pong ball with all his might, the perspiration rolling down his cheeks. The ball, of course, was almost as high as he was, and he had to throw his whole weight against it in order to keep it rolling.

The Littles had a grand piano in their living room, which was all right except that one of the keys was a sticky key and didn’t work properly. Mrs. Little said she thought it must be the damp weather, but I don’t see how it could be the damp weather, for the key had been sticking for about four years, during which time there had been many bright clear days. But anyway, the key stuck, and was a great inconvenience to anyone trying to play the piano. It bothered George particularly when he was playing the Scarf Dance, which was rather lively. It was George who had the idea of stationing Stuart inside the piano to push the key up the second it was played. This was no easy job for Stuart, as he had to crouch down between the felt hammers so that he wouldn’t get hit on the head. But Stuart liked it just the same: it was exciting inside the piano, dodging about, and the noise was

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Ce que les gens pensent de Stuart Little

3.6
77 évaluations / 61 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    This just the cutest little story ever...I love it and read to my kids every chance i get. The movie is good but the books are so much better.
  • (4/5)
    Adventurous tale of a mouse with all the human characteristics one would need to identify with and therefore, love. An enormous favorite of mine, read around age 11 (who can remember exactly??) I know that jr high was when I nicknamed myself ~mouse~ Coincidence? I think not... :)
  • (3/5)
    I had never read Stuart Little before. Since I've been working on reading more books to my four-year old son, I decided we would read Stuart Little. Honestly, I thought the premise was kind of dumb. I'm still not sure if the Little's had a baby who happened to be just about exactly like a mouse, or if they found a mouse and, being slightly crazy, thought it was their baby! But, either way, the book is all about little Stuart growing up. It is comprised of several episodes throughout Stuart's childhood that could almost stand alone as stories of their own. Each episode covered a chapter or two of the book, and they were all mostly entertaining. One episode was a boat race, in which Stuart sailed a toy ship. It was full of action and, unfortunately, nautical terms that I had to explain to my son. Technically, I just told him that it had something to do with boats because I didn't know what half of the terms meant either, but it made for some slow reading!

    I didn't really care for Stuart's personality. While he seemed to care about certain people and things, he was all-too-ready to throw them away when something more important came up, or when things just didn't go his way. But in the end, what ruined the entire experience was the ending. I suppose many people that have already read the book think that the ending was genius, that Stuart had "grown up" or something. To me, it was just too abrupt.
  • (4/5)
    8 to 12 years. In his Stuart Little (Harper & Row, 1974), E. B. White chronicles the entertaining adventures of a charming and chivalrous mouse who is both debonair and wears a 'wrapper,' but also can bravely sail a model schooner across a pond. E. B. White begins with Stuart's arrival into his New York family's home and describes his life and the problem solving his short stature requires. Then it charts his meeting of the wild songbird Margalo, how they save each other's lives, and how he searches for her in the northerly country-side after she leaves. Stuart may not find Margalo but he does find the love of searching and exploration, a worthy idea for young readers to contemplate. But it does make for one of the controversial elements about the book. Stuart Little may charm young readers with the idea of a miniature life amidst humans, but can leave them wistful for more plot resolution or practicing comfort with the lack thereof. However, E. B. White's succinct, principled prose perfectly suits his short, principled character. Garth Williams lovingly provides the illustrations designed to show the perspective of a mouse. Each chapter is a complete story in itself and makes the book a delightful K through 5th grade classroom read aloud. It also is an excellent book for the emerging reader. A classic, Stuart Little is a must for every public library collection.
  • (4/5)
    Stuart Little by E.B. White is a cute story of a tiny mouse and his adventures through life. Stuart is obviously different from his family, but that does not stop him from living a “normal” life. He uses his smallness as his strength, not his weakness. From helping recover his mother’s ring out of the drain, to his adventures in the classroom, this book is meant for younger children who can get lost in the fantasy and will enjoy imagining other adventures after reading. Young children often have seen, held, interacted with a pet mouse, and will be taken away with how fun it would be to have a Stuart running around the house, helping out with things that were impossible for people of normal size. The acceptance of Stuart by his family and supporting characters gives this story believability. Children will be able to relate with Stuart’s character and the difficult obstacles he faces given his differences. They will love his sense of adventure and will identify with his shyness. The universal truth is shown through Stuart’s adventures. The reader will discover that being different doesn’t make you weird or prevent you from accomplishing something. The talking animals and character relationships remind me of Charlotte’s Web.
  • (3/5)
    Loved it as a kid, but reading it to my kids now to find out the ending was rushed and many plot points were left unresolved. Disappointed.
  • (3/5)
    This slight collection of stories is a fast read even when you read it slow. There is sort of a sly, subtle sense of humor lurking in these stories. I read a few of these to the kids when they were little but I don't recall ever getting very far, although I do recall the story near the end where 2" mousechild Stuart meets a 2" girl and goes on a failure of a date adventure. The illustrations by Garth Williams are quite good at capturing moments of the stories. I found it a little odd that the "story", or more accurately, series of stories, ended unresolved.
  • (4/5)
    Summary:Stuart Little is about the youngest son of the Little family who resembles a mouse. Stuart, though short and mouse-like, did not let his size or appearance hold him back. He was a vivacious mouse who had many adventures in New York. Stuart falls in love with a bird named Margalo, but she disappears one day. Stuart travels to find Margalo having many escapades along the way.Personal Reaction:I do not remember reading Stuart Little when I was a kid, but I do remember watching the movie. If I remember correctly, the movie was similar to but not exactly like the book. I enjoyed reading this book even though it was above the grade level I will be teaching. Classroom Extension Ideas:1. I believe the moral of the story is no matter who you are or what you look like, you can accomplish your dreams. I would explain this to the children then have them write a paragraph about the dreams they have. 2. Explain the moral to the children. Then instruct them to dress up the next day in a costume that represents their dream job. When they are dressed up, have the children tell why they chose this particular career.
  • (4/5)
    Read as a child, and recently listened to the audio version with the family on a long car trip. I highly recommend the recording by Julie Harris. She is a terrific narrator, and the story's gentle humor really comes through in her performance. I didn't remember how absurd this story was, but it is just as entertaining now as when I was little. The story is episodic, with only a loosely connected plot that entails Stuart meeting and falling in love with a wounded bird, then going out into the world to look for her when she flies away out of fear of being eaten by a cat. My favorite episodes where when Stuart took over as a substitute teacher and when he had a miserable failure of a first date with the only other two-inch-tall person he had met. The ending still feels somewhat abrupt, though, stopping in mid-search. We were left wanting more Stuart!
  • (5/5)
    This tattered, fading, former library copy of Stuart Little was recently uncovered hiding away in my parents' attic. I remember it fondly from my childhood, and am glad to once again have it in my possession.How can you not love Stuart Little? A small, mousy boy (literally!) born to human parents who constantly finds himself in one adventure after another. From sailing a model ship in Central Park, to almost being permanently lost at see, and even nearly dying several times within his own home; Stuart has quite the thrilling life. Then, he eventually takes this show on the road when his first real friend, a bird named Margalo, takes off for parts North.It's been so long since I gave this one a read, I had forgotten the serious tone of the book. Although, being from E.B. White I shouldn't be surprised. Still, it makes the book that more enjoyable to return to as an adult.
  • (3/5)
    "Stuart Little" is the story of a mouse named Stuart Little. He is unlike any of his family members - who are all human. Stuart embarks on several adventures and tries to outsmart the family's cat, Snowbell. Stuart makes a new friend in Margalo, a bird. When Margalo goes missing, Stuart sets out to find her.Although unrealistic, the story is interesting and the pictures add to the text. The ending is a little disappointing as it leaves the reader wondering, "What happens to Stuart?" "Does he find Margalo?" "Does he ever return home?" "What does his family think?"
  • (3/5)
    When Stuart is born into the Little family, the first thing they notice is that he is quite mouse-like. As they rig their house to accommodate their new very small addition (including pulleys, ladders, and crazy contraptions), Stuart finds his place within their family and the world, even though it is not quite what he expected it to be. I think my favorite part is all the crazy gadgets they create so that he can be self sufficient (that is what I remembered most from reading this when I was younger). I think the fact that there was a very small girl, too was a little weird, but then again the idea that a mouse could be born in a human family is also quite weird. Very imaginative!
  • (3/5)
    This novel was a bit lacking for me. I realize that it is a children's novel, but that does not excuse the lack of complete story the book provides. Instead of a start, middle and end, this is a series of snapshots from Stuart's life. I believe this would be better sold as a collection of related stories. Sure, how Stuart deals with different aspects of life in the full-grown world as a two-inch mouse is interesting, but it wasn't closed.
  • (5/5)
    Delightful and strange. Although the Littles' second child is a mouse, he is brought up as a human. His family does make allowances for his size, but they basically treat him like a person. There's a scene in Central Park in which Stuart gets to captain a small boat in the pond and have grand adventures.
  • (3/5)
    I feel like I need to take off points for the ending. I thought I was missing a chapter it was so abrupt. It was an enjoyable collection of tales, though (it was not a smooth narrative, however).
  • (2/5)
    Stuart Little is a mouse and this book is about how he tries to find the love of his life, Margalo. Stuart Little was born from a normal family in a normal house. He lives with his mom and dad and brother, George and his cat, Snowbell. One day a bird name Margalo was flying and broke its wing. The Little's decided to help her and take care of her. When she is warned that Snowbell and his friends were going to eat her, she leaves. After she leaves, Stuart decided to go after her and bring her home. Near the end of the book, he still hasn't found her. But he has a good feeling that he will.I give the book 2/5 because I didn't really like the ending but it was kinda good. I thought it should've been longer with it ending at Stuart finding Margalo and him living with her.
  • (1/5)
    Before I say why I hated Stuart Little so much, let me first say that Charlotte's Web is a favorite of mine. I have loved other books involving talking animals too. I'm not bothered by talking animals. I am somewhat bothered by books that don't have an actual plot, but just randomly wander through unrelated events in the characters lives, but I can forgive that as well. Ginger Pye was a book like this, and I rather enjoyed it. But I am not a young adult. I am a 50 year old who loves reading young adult novels. I may have loved Stuart Little had I read it when I was 8. But as an adult, I simply found it stupid.It was filled with nonsense. It's not just that Stuart is a mouse... he is the actual birth child of human parents! He is supposed to be a child, but behaves in all ways like an adult. All animals talk, and all humans can carry on conversations with them. Someone gives Stuart an actual gasoline powered mouse sized automobile, which is silly enough... but that automobile has a button to make it invisible! This serves no purpose whatsoever other than to provide two or three pages of nonsense, with Stuart and the man who made the car chasing a miniature invisible car around an office. It never comes into play again. Stuart encounters a two inch tall woman. A human woman, 2 inches tall. The book ends with Stuart driving in his car in search of a bird he met earlier in the book. And it just ends, leaving me feeling that E.B. White was about as tired of this absurd book as I was so he just quit writing it mid-story.Again, a young child may love it. And maybe an adult who loved it as a young child would have a nostalgic fondness for it. But as an adult reading it for the first time, it sunk to the bottom of my YA novel barrel.
  • (4/5)
    It is a nice children's book. Definitely a classic. But reading it as an adult I didn't find it anything amazing. I think the people who recommended it just remember their fond memories as kids. If you are an adult and have never read it before and are planning to read it for yourself, I would say skip it.
  • (5/5)
    great classic!
  • (5/5)
    What's not to love about this wonderful classic about a mouse who is adopted into a human family. Stuart Little is about a small mouse that is adopted by a human family, but they love him just as much as their human son. Stuart finds that as a mouse he has many adventures in a day. His family finds it a bit stressful and worrisome, but Stuart finds it fun and adventuresome. When Stuart's friend, a bird, Margalo is missing from her nest Stuart decides to find her, no matter where that adventure may take him. Will he find her? Will he survive the dangers of the big world out there to try and find her?I just loved this book as a kid and as I read it again, I love it even more. This is a wonderful classic kids book that really is one hundred percent pure fun for the reader. I loved everything about this book. The writing is great and very detailed, the characters are fantastic and easy to love, and the pictures are so cute and add to the writing. Wonderful book for all ages!5/5 Stars!!
  • (4/5)
    In this classic tale for children, the Little family adopts a son, Stuart...but he turns out to look very much like a mouse! As Stuart grows, he has many adventures within his home and, later, out in the real world. This is an adorable book filled with child-like adventure. Appropriate to be read to young children, or to be read by a 2nd or 3rd grader.
  • (3/5)
    I did not actually read this as a child - Charlotte's Web is the only White book I read then. But I was curious, because this is a big favorite for a lot of people. It's well written - but ultimately doesn't go anywhere. It spends a lot of it's time freaking the reader out that Stuart is a in a lot of danger, then getting him out of that danger. I don't have any strong feelings about it, so it's not like it could let me down, but it's not nearly as good as Charlotte's Web. I didn't see the movie - but I do like Michael J. Fox, so maybe I will someday.
  • (3/5)
    Although the adventures of the mouse, Stuart Little, were fun and adventurous, as an adult reading the story to my grandchild, the adventures seemed to have no real thread and hopped from one thing to another and there was not real thread or "moral to the story." Not really one that I would choose again.
  • (5/5)
    A book about a mouse named Stuart who was adopted by a human family. He has a brother named George who at first does not like him. Their is also a cat named Snowball who does not get along with Stuart. There are many obstacles that Stuart goes through. Some funny some sad. He evn feels like he doesn't belong. Thing swork out in the end. This is a fav. book of mine. This is a good book for imagination. I would have my kids write about someone or something that they would like for a friend.
  • (3/5)
    Perhaps I would have felt differently growing up with this book, but as an adult this book struck me as profoundly weird. First off, a human couple give birth to a mouse, and no one seems to think this is at all strange. Their first son is human; their second son is a rodent. What? Anyway, this is basically a collection of Stuart's various adventures, including boating, substitute teaching, and courting a 2-inch tall human girl. I don't even know. The ending is left completely open, which I suppose could be inspiring for a young imagination, but I didn't know it was coming so I was a little confused at the end. Oh well. It was fine, and there were parts that were funny just because they were so strange.
  • (4/5)
    Stuart is a mouse born to a human family, the Littles, He is shy and thoughtful, but longs for adventure. His adventure begins when he goes in search for his friend Margalo, a bird that has disappeared form her nest. I used this book to introduce chapter books and read aloud in class.
  • (4/5)
    Stuart, a mouse, lives with the Little family and the story follows him on the adventure of growing up. Stuart is the most developed character, but all the other characters are described well enough to be able to enjoy the story. The plot is a bit choppy with very little transition between chapters so that each chapter could almost stand on it's own with a small adventure or journey occurring. The setting of the Little's house is well described and the journey that Stuart embarks on at the end of the story is also well done. As a classic piece of Children's Literature this should be included in a public library setting.
  • (4/5)
    Fun book as a child.
  • (5/5)
    This is a perfect book.
  • (3/5)
    My memory of this book as a child is fond. Now, not so much. I didn't remember any of the plot, but reading it as an adult I found myself removed from the story. I particularly did not like the episode when Stuart has prepared his boat all day for an afternoon with his lady friend, and then refuses to adapt when the situation does not go as planned. Maybe this didn't matter to me when I was eight. The chapters are short though, and well suited to young readers because each of Stuart's adventures is fairly independent. I would include it in my collection, although it wouldn't be the first EB White book I recommend.