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I, Columbus: My Journal, 1492–1493

I, Columbus: My Journal, 1492–1493

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I, Columbus: My Journal, 1492–1493

évaluations:
3/5 (4 évaluations)
Longueur:
50 pages
31 minutes
Sortie:
May 5, 2015
ISBN:
9781504010139
Format:
Livre

Description

A Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People: A firsthand account of Christopher Columbus’s famous voyage to the East, taken directly from his journal entries

Christopher Columbus had a dream—to reach the fabled lands of the East, rich with spices, jewels, silver, and especially gold. Having studied the travels of other explorers, Columbus was convinced he could reach his destination by traveling west across the seas. After convincing Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand to fund his expedition, he set sail in August of 1492.
 
In this account, the voyage Columbus undertook is told in his own voice through his journal entries of that year. He tells of excitement, drama, and terror on the high seas, as well as the doubts he faces from his own crew, as together, they weather the path to victory.
Sortie:
May 5, 2015
ISBN:
9781504010139
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Peter and Connie Roop are award-winning authors and educators who have published over one hundred children’s books, including the Reading Rainbow feature selection Keep the Lights Burning, Abbie. They have written biographies, historical fiction, general fiction, and science books. In 2013 the Wisconsin Library Association recognized the Roops as Notable Wisconsin Authors for their body of work, and Peter Roop has been named a Wisconsin State Teacher of the Year.

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Aperçu du livre

I, Columbus - Peter Roop

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Prologue

Columbus was the finest sailor of his time. He knew the winds and the waters. He knew his locations from the sun and the stars. Watching a log float from bow to stern he could calculate how fast his ship sailed. He had sailed south along the coast of Africa, navigated north to England and Iceland, criss-crossed the Mediterranean Sea, and sailed west to the Canary islands. I went to sea at an early age, he wrote in 1501. There I have continued to this day. I have sailed everywhere that it is navigable.

Christopher Columbus had a dream. He would sail west to reach the fabled lands of the East, rich in spices, jewels, silver, and gold—especially gold. The mysteries and wealth of India, Japan, and China called to him from halfway around the world. Columbus knew other explorers had reached the Indies by traveling east over land and sea. He had read their books, marked their maps, studied their charts. His own notes and ideas filled the margins of his copy of Marco Polo’s Travels.

Columbus convinced Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand that they could capture Jerusalem with the gold he brought back from the Indies. I have already petitioned Your Highnesses that all of the profits of my enterprise should be spent on the conquest of Jerusalem. Your Highnesses smiled and said this idea pleased them, Columbus wrote in his Log.

So it was that on August 3, 1492, Christopher Columbus and eighty-nine men set sail on a voyage to the unknown. This Log is Columbus’s record of that voyage, told in his own words.

Most Christian, exalted, excellent, and powerful Princes, King and Queen of the Spains and of the islands of the seas, our Sovereigns; It was in this year of 1492 that Your Highnesses concluded the war with the Moors who reigned in Europe. In the same month, based on the information that I had given Your Highnesses about the land of India and about a Prince who is called the Great Khan, which in our language means King of Kings, Your Highnesses decide to send me, Christopher Columbus, to the regions of India, to see the Princes there and the peoples and the lands, and to learn of their disposition, and of everything, and the measures which could be taken for their conversion to our Holy Faith.

In May of 1492 I went to

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Avis des lecteurs

  • (3/5)
    Very brief, easy to read, great for young readers or the classroom. The pictures are well done and a good conversation point, along with the maps and woodcuts.
  • (3/5)
    This translation is mainly directed at sailors who would like to follow Columbus's course, and its coverage of the debates over Columbus's first landfall and the course of his first voyage is thorough and interesting. The text of the log, however, is unreliable and tampers with the Spanish sources, although at least the most blatant instances of tampering are usually mentioned in a footnote. The style is perhaps too casual, and the approach to Columbus himself is unabashedly hero-worshiping. I'm finding the appendices to be the best parts of the book. One contains an abridged reprint of Gustavus V. Fox's case for Samana Cay as Columbus's "San Salvador." Robert H. Fuson is an academic geographer with a military background.
  • (1/5)
    this book is incredibly problematic and harmful to read to children. This story Ignores the brutality and truth of Columbus' journey and his contribution to the Native genocide. Please do your research before you teach this to children.