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From the Publisher

Is it normal to forget where you parked your car? Do we really shrink as we grow older? Does everyone experience lower libido as they age?

More than 78 million American adults are nearing the age when unexpected aches and pains, weight gains, sudden illnesses, and confusing mental changes begin to occur. As children, our questions about how our bodies will change are met with knowledge and patience--anything to make the transition as seamless as possible. But at 50 or 60, there's no one to help us figure out whether the changes we're experiencing are a cause for concern or just a normal part of aging.

Is This Normal? is a guidebook that focuses on putting this generation at ease by answering their most common questions. From superficial concerns to everyday aches and pains to more serious medical problems, Dr. John Whyte, chief medical expert at Discovery Channel, cuts through the confusion and provides practical answers for the most common age-related health issues. In Is This Normal?, he answers a broad range of questions, such as:

How much weight gain is normal as we age--and why is it so hard to lose? Is it normal to need a pair of reading glasses just to decipher a restaurant menu? What are the signs of Alzheimer's versus normal memory loss?

With compassion, reassurance, and friendly guidance, Dr. Whyte provides cutting-edge medical advice for the effects of aging we face every day--from gray hair and wrinkles to cardiovascular health. Is This Normal? arms readers with the essential knowledge and preventive strategies they need stay healthy and vital for decades to come.

Published: Rodale on
ISBN: 9781609611224
List price: $15.99
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