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Growing Grain Crops in Dry Areas - With Information on Varieties of Grain Crop Suitable for Dry Land Farming

Growing Grain Crops in Dry Areas - With Information on Varieties of Grain Crop Suitable for Dry Land Farming

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Growing Grain Crops in Dry Areas - With Information on Varieties of Grain Crop Suitable for Dry Land Farming

Longueur:
44 pages
39 minutes
Sortie:
Oct 26, 2011
ISBN:
9781447490913
Format:
Livre

Description

This book offers the reader a comprehensive guide to growing grain in arid areas, exploring in detail the various problems and how they can be overcome. Containing information on the methods of growing a variety of different types of grain crop, this detailed handbook is thoroughly recommended for anyone interested in the techniques of the agricultural industry. Contents include: “Farming”, “Growing Grain Crops In Dry Areas”, “Growing Wheat, Winter And Spring”, “Growing Rye, Winter And Spring”, “Growing Flax”. Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive. It is with this in mind that we are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially-commissioned new introduction on farming.
Sortie:
Oct 26, 2011
ISBN:
9781447490913
Format:
Livre

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Growing Grain Crops in Dry Areas - With Information on Varieties of Grain Crop Suitable for Dry Land Farming - Thomas Shaw

Flax

GROWING GRAIN CROPS IN DRY AREAS

The chief of the small grains grown in Montana, and in fact in all the states north of Salt Lake City, include the following: Winter and spring wheat, winter and spring rye, flax, barley, oats, peas and speltz. The aim has been to name these in the order of relative importance viewed from the standpoint of possible profitable production based on the climate and soil conditions. But it does not follow that the relative importance thus assigned to them will correspond with the extent to which they will be grown by the farmer, at least for many years to come. There can be no question, however, about the place that shall be assigned to wheat in the semi-arid region. It will probably continue to hold the premier place among the revenue producing crops on the unirrigated land during the centuries that are yet to be.

GROWING WHEAT, WINTER AND SPRING

While both winter and spring wheat may and will be grown on the lands of much of the semi-arid country, winter wheat will, in nearly all instances, be the more important crop. This will follow, first, from the fact that it will produce much larger yields than spring wheat; such at least has been the case in all areas practically that have been found favorable to the growth of winter wheat. The difference will probably be not less than 50 per cent. in favor of winter wheat on the average. It will follow, second, from the fact that winter wheat will mature earlier than spring wheat and will, therefore, be much less injured by the drought and heat that characterize the summer months. It will follow, third, from the fact that it so changes the time of the sowing and the reaping, that the farmer can grow this crop without adding to the expense for hired labor. The adaptations of the conditions for growing winter wheat successfully in the semi-arid country are indeed remarkable, whether the bulk of the precipitation comes in the autumn and winter months or during the period of greatest growth. The winter wheat crop, because of the very large yields that are frequently obtained, will, in many instances, pay for the land that grew it in a single crop. This does not mean that spring wheat may not be grown with much success in many areas, but that the attention should rather be centered on the growing of winter wheat where it may be grown with remarkable success.

DRY LAND DURUM WHEAT GROWN NEAR GREAT FALLS, MONT

Courtesy Great Northern Railway Co.

Soils.—The soils of the larger portions of the arable farms of the western states have high adaptation for the growth of winter wheat. They are exceedingly rich in the mineral constituents that favor grain production, they may, as a rule, be easily penetrated by the roots of the wheat plants and they very readily retain moisture that falls when properly managed. The clay loam soils and the sandy loam soils underlaid with clay, and the volcanic ash soils of the farther west, have very high adaptation for growing wheat with reference, first, to the food constituents which they contain; second, with

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