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Bad Kitty Drawn to Trouble

Bad Kitty Drawn to Trouble

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Bad Kitty Drawn to Trouble

évaluations:
4.5/5 (37 évaluations)
Longueur:
122 pages
1 heure
Sortie:
Jan 7, 2014
ISBN:
9781466862050
Format:
Livre

Description

Written by Scribd Editors

Bad Kitty is at it again - but this time, she's not alone. In this seventh installment of the New York Times bestselling series, Kitty may have finally met her match as she encounters the most formidable foe yet: her creator!

In Bad Kitty Drawn to Trouble, author/illustrator Nick Bruel enlists the (unwilling) help of Kitty to explain to the reader how to write a story. Kitty makes her misery quite clear throughout her exploits, especially when the plot involves her being put on a turnip diet to lose weight. Despite Kitty's best efforts at sabotage, Nick successfully teaches kids how a book is created. The frequent interruptions from you-know-who only serve to support the tasks at hand as the reader learns about protagonists, setting, plot, conflict and more in a fun-filled way.

This “how to write a story” book is the perfect gift for the aspiring young writer. Includes a recipe for roasted turnips.

A Neal Porter Book

Sortie:
Jan 7, 2014
ISBN:
9781466862050
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Nick Bruel is the author and illustrator of New York Times bestseller Boing, Bad Kitty, Bad Kitty Gets a Bath and Bad Kitty Meets the Baby, among others. Nick is a freelance illustrator and cartoonist, and during his down time, he collects PEZ dispensers and grows tomatoes in the backyard. He lives in Tarrytown, NY with his wife Carina and their lovely cat Esmerelda.

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Bad Kitty Drawn to Trouble - Nick Bruel

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Ce que les gens pensent de Bad Kitty Drawn to Trouble

4.6
37 évaluations / 10 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    Wacky, funny, I guess bizarre story that ends in a surprising way when strange kitty pops up.
  • (5/5)
    What I liked was that the author told me about how to write my own story and what everything means for a writer
  • (5/5)
    It was awesome and so funny I absolutely loved it

  • (4/5)
    This is one in a series of books. The main character is Bad Kitty; a grouchy, uninterested and uncooperative cat. The book explains about books, parts of books and how they are written. The author, Nick Bruel, explains it in text and picture with kid-oriented humour.Nick Bruel is the author and artist. The book is filled with illustrations throughout. In various chapters things such as author, character, conflict, antagonist, and plot points are explained. Done in a humourous way, it strives to not just explain writing but to encourage kids to write stories that are their own.It is a fun read and I think adults can learn from this as well as kids. It takes a topic that could be dry and boring and makes it funny and interesting.I will keep my eye out for more of the books from this series!
  • (4/5)
    Fans of Bad Kitty as well as those interested in writing, cartooning, and drawing, will enjoy learning how a best-selling author creates a book. Bruel keeps his lessons to the same light, humorous tone as the other books. I quite like that he includes even the colors he uses.

    Library copy.
  • (5/5)
    It was my favorite one so far
  • (5/5)
    funny and informative; great way to learn about books, their components and the criteria use to review them
  • (5/5)
    My daughter and I are huge fans of Bad Kitty, so when the opportunity came up to get an advanced copy of the latest volume, I snagged it up. There are plenty of kid books out there on writing, but this is one of the most enjoyable, easy-to-digest, ones out there, while managing to be highly informative. It hits the high points -- main character, conflict, premise, plot and plot points, antagonist, ending, and even using the dictionary -- using hilarious examples from the Bad Kitty universe.
  • (4/5)
    From meeting Nick Bruel and learning to draw Bad Kitty all the way to a discussion of artistic inspiration, Nick Bruel and his able partner Bad Kitty show readers the elements of a story in an engagingly humorous manner. Elements like Characters, Setting, Plot, Protagonist and Antagonist are illustrated in a humorous way. Uncle Murray's Fun Facts add additional information. There is even a recipe for roasted turnips to round out the story (which actually makes sense if you read the book.)I enjoyed the subtly sly illustrations and the outrageous plot. Young readers who enjoy Bad Kitty books will enjoy this one too and learn something about writing a book in the process.
  • (5/5)
    Bad Kitty Drawn to Trouble by Nick Bruel is the latest of the Bad Kitty graphic novels. This one is a bit different because Bad Kitty is made aware of her creator in an effort to teach children how to write fiction.Bruel begins the book by teaching how to draw Bad Kitty. There are spaces next to each step for a child to try his or her hand it. In my copy, those spaces are filled with my daughter's attempts. It is from the drawing process that Bad Kitty eventually springs to life. And from there she begins to demand a place to be. Like in Duck Amuck (Chuck Jones, Warner Bros., 1953) And through the artistic torture of Bad Kitty (wrong sets, bizarre situations, etc), Bruel teaches the basics of story telling. He includes a term I haven't seen in how to write books aimed at children — the MacGuffin. Interestingly, although it's a film term, the script writing teacher I had at UCLA, didn't use the term in his lectures.Anyway, the MacGuffin isn't usually usually used as a way for the audience to torture the protagonist as it is in Bad Kitty Drawn to Trouble, but it is sometimes personified. The best example of this personification is in the two part "Chicago Holiday" episodes that aired on November 10 and 17, 1994 of season one of Due South. While Fraser is trying to keep the Ambassador's daughter out of trouble (that she keeps putting herself into), Ray is trying to track down a list of names that will break a case open. They've been written on the inside of a matchbook which goes on its own crisscrossing journey of Chicago. Two of those characters are named MacGuffin: Mrs. MacGuffin, of hotel housekeeping, who takes the matchbook from the Ambassador's room and tosses it down the garbage shoot, and the store manager's name whose name tag in reverse reads "Mg. Uffin". In the acknowledgements section, Nick Bruel doesn't include Due South, but he does point children to both Duck Amuck and it's sequel Rabbit Rampage (Chuck Jones, Warner Bros., 1955), and the grand-daddy of them all, Gertie the Dinosaur by Winsor McCay (1914) This is a fun book for both children and parents, one that might inspire lots of video watching by both, and hopefully some story telling / story writing too.