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A Primer on How Institutions Think

A Primer on How Institutions Think

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A Primer on How Institutions Think

Longueur:
57 pages
26 minutes
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Apr 28, 2015
ISBN:
9781942824060
Format:
Livre

Description

Why a series of primers?
These primers provide in depth coverage of the nested form constructs in the book: How to Define the Word “Religion”.
Primers 1 and 2 developed the category-based nested forms discussed in “the meaning underlying the word ‘religion’”.
The next several primer address “the presence underlying the word ‘religion’”. This presence can be appreciated through a fully differentiated model of “humans in our current Lebenswelt”. Humans exist in society. Humans organize. Human live as individuals in community. Each of these modes of existence relate to one another as a nested form:
Society( Organization( potential of Individual in Community))
Primer 3 diagrams the individual in community. Primers 4 and 5 present the organization tier. Primer 6 introduces the institution level of the society tier, starting with an example, the family. Primer 7 reviews How Institutions Think (1986) by British anthropologist Mary Douglas.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Apr 28, 2015
ISBN:
9781942824060
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

See website for bio.

Lié à A Primer on How Institutions Think

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Aperçu du livre

A Primer on How Institutions Think - Razie Mah

A Primer on How Institutions Think

Razie Mah

Published for Smashwords

7815 U0’

This 7400 word primer continues to develop the institution level of the society tier in a category-based nested form model of the presence underlying the word ‘religion’. This primer reviews How Institutions Think by Mary Douglas (1986: Syracuse University Press).

This is the 7th in the Primer Series on category-based models.

Note: Single quotes and italics are used to group words together for easier reading.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 in My Own Words

Chapter 2 in My Own Words

Fleck’s Terminology Comes to Life

Signs of the Real

Concluding Chapter 2

Chapter 3 in My Own Words

Conclusion of Chapter 3

The Remaining Chapters Turn the Paradigm Around

Summary of Institution Level Interscope

Conclusion

Chapter 1 in My Own Words

0001 Thirty years ago, in 7785 U0’, the British social anthropologist Mary Douglas presented the sixth Abrams’ lecture at Syracuse University.

Frank W. Abrams was a lifelong leader in support of higher education. He played key roles in the Council for Financial Aid to Education, the Ford Foundation’s fund for the Advancement of Education, and the Alfred E. Sloan Foundation. Undoubtedly, Mr. Abrams was a Progressive, like most leaders of his time. He would not have viewed Mary Douglas as subversive, even though she was.

Mary Douglas was that good.

0002 Her lectures aimed to discredit rational choice theory. In its place, she proposed a hybrid of Emile Durkheim and Ludwik Fleck’s ideas.

Emile Durkheim (7658-7717 U0’) was a French anthropologist interested in comprehending so-called primitive peoples. Ludwik Fleck (7696-7761 U0’) was a Polish and Israeli microbiologist interested in comprehending how scientific facts were established.

From these divergent starting points, both arrived at a sociology of institutional thought. My intent is to re-articulate Douglas’ argument within the framework of the three tiered model of the presence underlying the word ‘religion’.

Emile Durkheim

0003 Durkheim was interested in the social origins of human thought. Utility might account for some thought, but that was limited to sensible thinking. Utility makes sense in a sensical world. But, the world is not always sensical. There are many features of our world that make no sense at

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