• book

From the Publisher

One of Library Journal’s 10 Best Books of 2015

Following his acclaimed Atlantic and The Men Who United the States, New York Times bestselling author Simon Winchester offers an enthralling biography of the Pacific Ocean and its role in the modern world, exploring our relationship with this imposing force of nature.

As the Mediterranean shaped the classical world, and the Atlantic connected Europe to the New World, the Pacific Ocean defines our tomorrow. With China on the rise, so, too, are the American cities of the West coast, including Seattle, San Francisco, and the long cluster of towns down the Silicon Valley.

Today, the Pacific is ascendant. Its geological history has long transformed us—tremendous earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis—but its human history, from a Western perspective, is quite young, beginning with Magellan’s sixteenth-century circumnavigation. It is a natural wonder whose most fascinating history is currently being made.

In telling the story of the Pacific, Simon Winchester takes us from the Bering Strait to Cape Horn, the Yangtze River to the Panama Canal, and to the many small islands and archipelagos that lie in between. He observes the fall of a dictator in Manila, visits aboriginals in northern Queensland, and is jailed in Tierra del Fuego, the land at the end of the world. His journey encompasses a trip down the Alaska Highway, a stop at the isolated Pitcairn Islands, a trek across South Korea and a glimpse of its mysterious northern neighbor.

Winchester’s personal experience is vast and his storytelling second to none. And his historical understanding of the region is formidable, making Pacific a paean to this magnificent sea of beauty, myth, and imagination that is transforming our lives.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062315434
List price: $14.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Pacific by Simon Winchester
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
10 min read

The Hidden Ocean Patch That Broke Climate Records: Why the recent global warming hiatus may have ended.

Nothing has caused climate scientists quite as much recent trouble as the so-called “global warming hiatus.” Not only did this approximately 14-year lull in the rise of global mean (or average) temperatures provide fodder for a variety of misguided climate change deniers (there have been other, longer pauses), but it also represented a genuine scientific mystery. Scientists knew it was being caused by falling ocean temperatures, but they also knew that the ocean, as a whole, was warming. Where was the extra heat being stored, and when would it make itself known? Then this past November Axel Ti
Nautilus
4 min read

Can New Research & Old Traditions Save Fiji From Ecological Collapse?

I look out the windshield of the taxi and see that the road through the tropical forest ends, but our journey does not. We continue on a rutted dirt road, then ford a small stream, and eventually emerge from the thick vegetation at the edge of a vast and empty beach. Here, we wait. A great deal of doing fieldwork in Fiji is waiting. This can sometimes feel at odds with the knowledge that passing time means the continued exhaustion of marine life in the coral reefs that ring these islands. My fellow passengers—Joshua Drew, a conservation biologist from Columbia University, and Sharyn Jones*, an
Popular Science
2 min read
Science

These New Photos Of Earth Lit Up At Night Are Actually Pretty Useful

NASA/NOAA A composite image with some artistic liberties taken to enhance the satellite imagery. We all like looking at pretty pictures of the Earth from space. Well, so does NASA—but for different reasons. NASA and its partner-in-crime, NOAA (the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) have been taking pictures of our globe from satellites for years now to better understand things like weather patterns and large-scale human impacts. They've mostly been taking those images during the day, simply because it's easier to get high quality pictures when there's plenty of light. But human i