Découvrez votre prochain livre préféré

Devenez membre aujourd'hui et lisez gratuitement pendant 30 jours
The Children’s Writer’s Guide

The Children’s Writer’s Guide

Lire l'aperçu

The Children’s Writer’s Guide

Longueur:
134 pages
1 heure
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jan 7, 2016
ISBN:
9781310700811
Format:
Livre

Description

The Children’s Writer’s Guide examines how you can get started as a writer, create time and space to pursue your craft and deal with lack of motivation and writers block. Topics covered include where ideas come from and how writers turn them into stories, choosing names for characters that are appropriate to the story, the importance of historical research if your novel is set in a different era, writing science fiction and fantasy, and the use of magic in stories for children.

The author examines the role of editing and revision and how to deal with what is often the inevitable process of rejection, at least until good fortune comes your way. The author also recounts some of his experiences with marketing and promotion, such as book launches and in-store signings, websites, blogs, and social media, and discusses presentations, workshops and author-in-residence programs at schools and libraries.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jan 7, 2016
ISBN:
9781310700811
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Simon Rose is a musician, author and researcher from London, England based in Berlin, Germany. He performs on baritone and alto saxophones in numerous collaborations and as soloist. He also collaborates beyond music with dancers, visual artists, mixed media, built instruments, site specific performance and more. His research interest is in creative processes.


Lié à The Children’s Writer’s Guide

Catégories liées

Aperçu du livre

The Children’s Writer’s Guide - Simon Rose

The

Children’s Writer’s Guide

The Children’s Writer’s Guide

Copyright © 2014 by Simon Rose

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without written permission from the publisher, except for the use of brief quotations for the purpose of a book review. For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, please contact Simon Rose at sorcerersletterbox@gmail.com

Published by Sorcerer's Letterbox Publishing, Calgary, Alberta

www.simon-rose.com

Editing by Ricki Ewings, Trail, British Columbia

Table of Contents

Title Page

Introduction

Chapter One: Starting Out as a Writer

Getting Started

Creating the Spark

In the Beginning

Kick-start Your Creativity

No Happily Ever After

Alternate History

Inspiration in Daily Life

Create Something from Nothing

Chapter Two: Creating Time and Space for Your Writing

The Home Office

Time for Writing

Night and Day

Chapter Three: The Curse of Writer’s Block

Planning Ahead

Switch Projects

Take a Break

Chapter Four: Where Do Ideas Come From?

What If?

Influences and Imagination

Historical Parallels

Turning Ideas into Stories

Chapter Five: Writing for Children

Time Travel Tales

Adult Characters

Chapter Six: In the Beginning: Hooking the Reader

Grabbing Attention

Creating Intrigue

People and Places

Chapter Seven: Naming Characters

Choosing the Right Name

Historical Considerations

Creating Impressions

Chapter Eight: Historical Research

Medieval Mysteries

Historical Resources

Maintaining Focus

Chapter Nine: Magic in Stories for Younger Readers

Familiar Faces

The Roots of Magic

Mystical Powers and Mythological Creatures

The Fantasy Realm

Magic and Time Travel

Magic and Reality

The Limits of Magic

Fatal Weaknesses

Themes in Magical Tales

Magical Objects

Secret Languages and Mysterious Books

Chapter Ten: The Importance of Editing and Revision

The Editing Process

Planning and Outlines

Checking Your Progress

Ready for Submission

Chapter Eleven: Dealing with Rejection

Taking It Personally

Reasons for Rejection

The Rejection Letter

Constructive Rejection

The Next Step

The Numbers Game

Remember, Everyone Gets Rejected

Chapter Twelve: Book Signings and Promotional Events

Choosing Locations

Building Relationships

Do Your Homework

Promotional Material

Autographed Copies

Chapter Thirteen: Author Visits and Workshops

Books as Classroom Resources

School Tours

Creating Presentations

Advance Planning

Money Matters

Book Sales

Author-in-Residence

Virtual Author Visits

Staying Connected

Chapter Fourteen: Virtually Famous: Websites for Authors and Writers

Creating Quality Content

Keeping it Current

Generating Traffic

The Value of Statistics

Conclusion

About the Author

Books by Simon Rose

Fiction

Non-fiction

Anthologies

Introduction

This book talks about getting started as a writer, creating time and space to pursue your craft and dealing with lack of motivation and writer’s block. It also looks at where ideas come from and how writers turn them into stories, choosing names for characters that are appropriate to the story, the importance of historical research if your novel is set in a different era, writing science fiction and fantasy and at the use of magic in stories for children. It examines the role of editing and revision and how to deal with what is often the inevitable process of rejection, at least until good fortune comes your way. I also recount some of my experiences with marketing and promotion, such as book launches and in-store signings, websites, blogs, and social media, and presentations, workshops and author-in residence programs at schools and libraries.

Chapter One:

Starting Out as a Writer

Getting Started

There appears to be an endless number of sites on the web offering advice on writing, concerning where to get ideas, character development, point of view, working in different genres, story structure, the editing process, how to capture the attention of publishers and agents and so on. And yet one of the most frequently asked questions, especially for beginners, is How do I actually get started with my writing? It may seem like a very simple question, but if you can’t get started, how can you ever make use of all these great tips that published writers, or at least very knowledgeable and prolific ones, offer all the time? Let’s examine some of the ways you can kick-start your creativity, then stay motivated in your quest to get your writing career not only on track, but into the fast lane as well. And don’t forget, even established writers sometimes have problems starting a particular project.

Creating the Spark

Free writing, sometimes referred to as stream-of-consciousness writing, involves writing continuously for a set period of time. Spelling, grammar, punctuation, and even a topic are largely irrelevant. Although the process may appear to result in mostly unusable material, it can help writers get to grips with their subject matter or to overcome the dreaded writer’s block. If you’re a regular writer, whether of stories for children, magazine articles, non-fiction pieces or something else entirely, you most likely already have a topic in mind. But you can certainly adapt the free writing method to suit your own purposes. It can be a good exercise to see if you can write a certain number of words in a day, but don’t be too concerned with the quality of the ideas. Nor do you need to think too much about editing and revising at this stage, since you can do that later. When you’re engaged in the exercise, the objective is to write as much as possible in the time you have allotted. You may decide to complete a certain word count completed that day or set yourself a time limit. Working against the clock may give you the incentive you need to get the job done. Writing a thousand words, for example, may seem daunting, but is very achievable. Even if you end up deleting a lot of this text afterwards, you still have the material to work on, no matter how irrelevant some of it may turn out to be. You’ll have to review the material before you decide which parts to get rid of, and in the process, you might get some new ideas for the project or take it in a completely new direction as you discover that much sought after inspiration.

In the Beginning

Even if you’re determined to work on your writing and have set time aside for it, there will be days when nothing seems to work to get you started. An interesting exercise to get a story moving is to use a collection of random objects drawn from a bag. The idea is then to create a story, in which these objects must all be used as a significant part of the narrative. For example, you could place a set of keys, a hairbrush, a pen, a cellphone, an apple, a sock, a postcard from the Caribbean, a teddy bear, an address book, a broken pair of sunglasses, a Post-it note, a watch, or indeed any collection of unrelated items in a bag. You then draw out four or five at random and use them to create your story. This type of exercise always sparks the imagination of children and you’d be surprised at what you come up with when confronted with a group of seemingly unconnected objects. You could even set a time limit to force yourself to devise the beginning, middle, and end of the story. The final result may not be bestseller material, but the process will stimulate your imagination and might be just enough to get your creativity moving again.

Kick-start Your Creativity

A great way to get started is to consider an overheard conversation and where it might lead. How about I’ll never forgive him for as long as I live, or I didn’t mean to set the laboratory on fire, it just kind of happened, or After that incident last year, her family will never be the same again? Any of these could be overheard in a supermarket, at a store checkout or on a bus or train journey. You could even find a mysterious note or a cellphone with a text message containing tantalizingly vague details from someone who may be in serious danger. Maybe you receive

Vous avez atteint la fin de cet aperçu. Inscrivez-vous pour en savoir plus !
Page 1 sur 1

Avis

Ce que les gens pensent de The Children’s Writer’s Guide

0
0 évaluations / 0 Avis
Qu'avez-vous pensé ?
Évaluation : 0 sur 5 étoiles

Avis des lecteurs