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Pickling - A How-To Guide with Recipes for the Pickling of Fruit and Vegetables

Pickling - A How-To Guide with Recipes for the Pickling of Fruit and Vegetables

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Pickling - A How-To Guide with Recipes for the Pickling of Fruit and Vegetables

Longueur:
101 pages
45 minutes
Sortie:
Aug 26, 2016
ISBN:
9781473354456
Format:
Livre

Description

A book containing a step by step guide to making pickles and pickling fruit and veg. Thoroughly recommended for the modern day cook who wishes to learn the skills of yesteryear.
Sortie:
Aug 26, 2016
ISBN:
9781473354456
Format:
Livre

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Pickling - A How-To Guide with Recipes for the Pickling of Fruit and Vegetables - Marion Harris Neil

BEETS

PICKLES, SWEET AND SOUR

Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers

A famous old authority in cooking tells us that pickles have been called the Sponges of Vinegar. The prejudice against pickles is fast disappearing. Formerly they were regarded as the most indigestible fare in the whole culinary realm. As fare they certainly are not particularly easy of digestion; but the work of pickles is to stimulate the appetite. In this they succeed admirably, and the fact must not be overlooked that vinegar exerts a solvent action on meat and vegetable fibers, so that pickles are really more digestible than the raw vegetables of which they are made.

Pickles, sweet or sour, are the easiest things to serve to relieve the monotony of an otherwise tasteless meal.

The chief points to keep in mind in putting up pickles are these: Choose vegetables that are whole and sound and not overripe, and clean them by rubbing with a damp cloth, then with a dry one, rather than by washing, unless they are to be boiled and dried; the presence of water, or even the use of a wet spoon, may spoil the pickle afterwards, preventing it from keeping.

The vinegar, sugar and spices employed should be the best of their kind.

In stirring or taking pickles from a jar use a spoon of horn, wood or silver, since these materials are not acted upon by acetic acid.

Do not use any vessel or utensil made of metal either in making or storing, as the brine and vinegar may corrode these and form a poisonous deposit on them, which will pass into the pickle. Boil the vinegar in an enameled saucepan, in a stoneware utensil, or in a good unglazed stew jar, setting it in either a large saucepan of boiling water or on the stove.

Store the pickles in glass vessels, stoneware jars, or unglazed earthenware. The glaze which is used inside earthenware jars usually contains lead, which is dissolved by the vinegar.

The vinegar should be pure cider vinegar, if possible.

Manufactured vinegar contains chemicals that will attack the pickles and soften them, or else allow other forces to destroy the material. Vinegar that is too strong will eat the pickles and if too weak it fails to pickle. There are two other things that may soften the materials; leaving too long in a strong brine, when the fiber is softened; heating too long in vinegar, when the material is really cooked.

The heating should be carried on only long enough to cause the flavor to strike in. There are a few exceptions in the case of pickles made up of a variety of materials all of which are to blend into one flavor. If the vinegar loses its strength, pour it off and cover the pickles with new vinegar that has been freshly scalded. If white specks appear, drain off and rescald the same

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