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The Modern Flower Garden - 5. Irises - With Chapters on the Genus and its Species and Raising Seedlings

The Modern Flower Garden - 5. Irises - With Chapters on the Genus and its Species and Raising Seedlings

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The Modern Flower Garden - 5. Irises - With Chapters on the Genus and its Species and Raising Seedlings

Longueur:
79 pages
45 minutes
Sortie:
Aug 26, 2016
ISBN:
9781473353473
Format:
Livre

Description

This is volume V of “The Modern Flower Garden” series, dealing with the Iris. Irises are perennial flowering plants with showy flowers that take their name from the Greek word for a rainbow. This volume contains a classic guide to growing these beautiful flowers, including all the information a Gardner needs to know relating plating, propagating, different varieties, common problems, and much more. Highly recommended for inclusion in gardening collections. Contents include: “The Genus and its Species”, “The Bearded Irises”, “The Apogon Section”, “Oncocylus, Regelia, Regelio-Cyclus, Pogo-Ctclus and other Irises”, “Diseases”, “Raising Seedlings, etc. Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive. It is with this in mind that we are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially-commissioned new introduction on the history of gardening.
Sortie:
Aug 26, 2016
ISBN:
9781473353473
Format:
Livre

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The Modern Flower Garden - 5. Irises - With Chapters on the Genus and its Species and Raising Seedlings - F. Wynn Hellings

CHAPTER I

The Genus and its Species

It is a lamentable fact that to most people in England the word iris still conveys no other image than the old blue flag, the so-called Iris germanica. A few enterprising nurserymen cultivate irises extensively for sale, a few hundreds of iris-lovers follow the cult assiduously, the Royal Horticultural Society and the Iris Society hold shows at which thousands of irises in all the colours of the rainbow are exhibited, and the two societies publish a considerable amount of literature on the subject of irises, but the iris is not cultivated to the extent that it should be, considering that it is one of the best and easiest of plants for the small amateur. For range of colour, length of season and wealth of beauty it is not surpassed by any other genus, and withal the iris is an aristocrat with a long lineage—probably Adam grew irises in the Garden of Eden. Perhaps the cause of this comparative neglect of the good-natured flower may be found partly in the persistence of the erroneous notion that all irises should be grown in shade and moisture, and partly in the unfortunate ubiquity of the old blue flag. Some of us have witnessed the speechless amazement of those who are confronted for the first time with a garden containing a large number of modern irises in a multitude of colourings, promising sensuous delights of which they have never dreamed, and this has deepened our regrets at the popular ignorance. The cult of iris growing and iris breeding has reached enormous dimensions in the United States, and why should England (all England is a garden) lag behind America, and in horticulture of all things?

The late W. R. Dykes, the great authority on irises, stated in 1924 that the known number of species was then at least 160. New species have been discovered since in China, the southern and western States of America, &c., and the total number may now be taken roughly as 190. It is by growing a number of these species that Dykes’s ideal of irises in flower for ten months in the year can be realized. Even if some species be ignored as being rare, expensive or difficult, it is comparatively easy for even the small amateur to have irises in flower for seven or eight months in the year. Nurserymen are beginning to realize this and to cater for a demand. Prices for most of these species are moderate, and the majority of them can be grown in the open without winter protection, although of course the use of a frame will extend the field of operations. The choice of the proper aspect in the garden and some little attention to soil preparation are required, but there is nothing to do which is difficult of achievement by even the week-end gardener. As regards professional growers, it must be pointed out that plantings of large numbers of the species take up so little space that even a small nursery can afford to grow them and nurserymen would be well-advised to include a selection in the alphabetical run of hardy plants in their catalogues, not segregate them in a separate section of their lists, thereby tending to intensify the erroneous impression that they require very special treatment and that success cannot be achieved without fasting and

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