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From the Publisher

A New York Times Bestseller
A Forbes Top 10 Conservation and Environment Book of 2016


Read the sea like a Viking and interpret ponds like a Polynesian—with a little help from the “natural navigator”!
 
In his eye-opening books The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs and The Natural Navigator, Tristan Gooley helped readers reconnect with nature by finding direction from the trees, stars, clouds, and more. Now, he turns his attention to our most abundant—yet perhaps least understood—resource.
 
Distilled from his far-flung adventures—sailing solo across the Atlantic, navigating with Omani tribespeople, canoeing in Borneo, and walking in his own backyard—Gooley shares hundreds of techniques in How to Read Water. Readers will:
  Find north using puddles Forecast the weather from waves Decode the colors of ponds Spot dangerous water in the dark Decipher wave patterns on beaches, and more!
Published: The Experiment an imprint of Workman eBooks on
ISBN: 9781615193592
List price: $15.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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