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Tashlich at Turtle Rock

Tashlich at Turtle Rock

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Tashlich at Turtle Rock

évaluations:
4/5 (2 évaluations)
Longueur:
33 pages
45 minutes
Sortie:
Jan 1, 2014
ISBN:
9781512495065
Format:
Livre

Description

Annie is excited about the Tashlich ceremony on the afternoon of Rosh Hashanah, when her family will walk to Turtle Rock Creek and throw crumbs into the water, as symbols of mistakes made the past year. As Annie leads her family through the woods stopping at favorite rocks, bridges, and waterfalls in her family’s own Tashlich ritual, they think about the good and bad things that happened during the past year, and make plans for a sweeter new year. This story focuses on ecological connections to the Tashlich ceremony and encourages families to customize the ritual and commune with nature at the New Year.

Sortie:
Jan 1, 2014
ISBN:
9781512495065
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Susan Schnur is a Reconstructionist rabbi whose "paper pulpit" is Lilith magazine, a Jewish women's quarterly. Susan lives with her husband in Boston, Massachusetts.


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Tashlich at Turtle Rock - Susan Schnur

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  • (4/5)
    Led by Annie, the daughter of the house, a Jewish family celebrates on the afternoon of Rosh Hashanah by observing the custom of Tashlich in their own unique way. Walking in the beautiful autumn woods near their home, they make four stops. At Turtle Rock they each write something good that happened in the past year on the stone, before erasing it with water. Next they come to Billy Goat's Bridge, where each family member throws away a symbolic natural item - an acorn cap, some leaves - representing a transgression for which they repent, or something about themselves they'd like to change. At Gypsy Landing, each must promise to do something in the coming year, leaving a wet footprint on the 'new year's rock' as testimony of their resolve. Finally, at Old Log, the family sit together and enjoy apples dipped in honey, symbolizing the sweetness of the Jewish New Year, while reciting a special prayer written by the mother.A lovely picture-book, one which shows a religious practice in harmony with nature, Tashlich at Turtle Rock was the debut children's title from Reconstructionist Rabbi Susan Schnur and her young daughter, Anna Schnur-Fishman, and is based upon their own family's personal observances of Rosh Hashanah and Tashlich. The latter, a custom in which the previous year's transgressions are symbolically cast off, in the form of bread or other food items, which are thrown into a flowing body of water, is described in the author's afterword as "minimal but powerful," leading her family to invent additional customs to amplify the meaning of the observance. I enjoyed this story, both because it highlights a religious practice in which ecological awareness is incorporated into pre-existing traditions, and because it can provide inspiration for other Jewish families looking to expand their Rosh Hashanah rituals. The illustrations, done by British artist Alex Steele-Morgan, are colorful and appealing. Recommended to anyone looking for Rosh Hashanah stories for young children, especially stories featuring less traditional Jewish families.