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Through Darkness to Light

Through Darkness to Light

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Through Darkness to Light

Longueur:
150 pages
43 minutes
Sortie:
Mar 28, 2017
ISBN:
9781616896096
Format:
Livre

Description

They left in the middle of the night—often carrying little more than the knowledge to follow the North Star. Between 1830 and the end of the Civil War in 1865, an estimated one hundred thousand slaves became passengers on the Underground Railroad, a journey of untold hardship, in search of freedom.

In Through Darkness to Light: Photographs Along the Underground Railroad, Jeanine Michna-Bales presents a remarkable series of images following a route from the cotton plantations of central Louisiana, through the cypress swamps of Mississippi and the plains of Indiana, north to the Canadian border— a path of nearly fourteen hundred miles. The culmination of a ten-year research quest, Through Darkness to Light imagines a journey along the Underground Railroad as it might have appeared to any freedom seeker.

Framing the powerful visual narrative is an introduction by Michna-Bales; a foreword by noted politician, pastor, and civil rights activist Andrew J. Young; and essays by Fergus M. Bordewich, Robert F. Darden, and Eric R. Jackson.
Sortie:
Mar 28, 2017
ISBN:
9781616896096
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Jeanine Michna-Bales is a Dallas–based photographer whose meticulously researched photo series explore the relationship between events and how society processes them. Images from her Underground Railroad series have been exhibited throughout the United States and have appeared in numerous online and print publications. In 2015, she received the First Place Review Prize from PhotoNOLA.

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Aperçu du livre

Through Darkness to Light - Jeanine Michna-Bales

Traveling by Moonlight, 2014

Published by

Princeton Architectural Press

A McEvoy Group company

37 East Seventh Street

New York, New York 10003

202 Warren Street,

Hudson, New York 12534

Visit our website at www.papress.com

© 2017 Jeanine Michna-Bales

All rights reserved

No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher, except in the context of reviews.

Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright.

Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent editions.

Editor: Jenny Florence

Design: Paul Wagner, Mia Johnson

Special thanks to: Janet Behning, Nicola Brower, Abby Bussel, Erin Cain, Tom Cho, Barbara Darko, Benjamin English, Jan Cigliano Hartman, Lia Hunt, Valerie Kamen, Simone Kaplan-Senchak, Stephanie Leke, Diane Levinson, Jennifer Lippert, Kristy Maier, Sara McKay, Jaime Nelson Noven, Esme Savage, Rob Shaeffer, Sara Stemen, Joseph Weston, and Janet Wong of Princeton Architectural Press

—Kevin C. Lippert, publisher

Library of Congress

Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Michna-Bales, Jeanine

Through darkness to light : photographs along the underground railroad / a photographic essay by Jeanine Michna-Bales

ISBN 978-1-61689-565-5 (alk. paper) | ISBN 978-1-61689-609-6 (epub, mobi)

1. Underground Railroad—Pictorial works. 2. Underground Railroad. 3. Fugitive slaves—Travel—United States—History—Pictorial works 4. African Americans—History—19th century—Pictorial works. 5. Historic sites—United States—Pictorial works.

LCC E450 .M58 2017 | DDC 973.7/11500222—dc2

Contents

Foreword

ANDREW J. YOUNG

Introduction

JEANINE MICHNA-BALES

PART I

THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

Bound for Freedom:

The History of the Underground Railroad

FERGUS M. BORDEWICH

Let Freedom Ring:

The Underground Railroad Comes Alive

ERIC R. JACKSON

The Spirituals

ROBERT F. DARDEN

PART II

THE JOURNEY: A PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAY

Notes on the Photographs

Epigraph Sources

Bibliography

Contributors

Acknowledgments

About the Author

Foreword

ANDREW J. YOUNG

Throughout my life and work I have been inspired by the stories and the legacy of the Underground Railroad. I remember, in particular, a phrase attributed to Harriet Tubman that I very much admire. When told of all the slaves she brought to freedom, she is said to have remarked, I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves. I think of her words today when I see how many people fail to understand the extent to which they may still be enslaved. Not in the sense of the chain and the whip, but in the sense of the modern mechanisms that manipulate us into being consumers rather than people. In fact, Martin Luther King Jr. used to say, Going from a brown bag to a martini glass is not freedom. In his mind, that was one of the dangers of the black bourgeois—unwittingly becoming slaves of materialism.

The Underground Railroad has been described as the first civil rights movement in the United States because it blurred racial, gender, religious, and socioeconomic lines and united people in the common cause of ending the injustice of slavery. I agree, and would offer the Amistad Rebellion and the group of slaves that mutinied off the coast of Long Island as an example of a similar, and connected, campaign. They were jailed in New Haven and most spoke the same language, so they had the benefit of communication and developed a leadership structure. These leaders, with the help of alumni of Yale University, persuaded former president John Quincy Adams to come out of retirement and successfully argue their case for freedom. More than half of them returned to Freetown, Sierra Leone, while a few remained, including a young woman, Sarah Margru Kinson, who would attend Oberlin College. In my opinion this was the start of the anti-slavery movement in the United States, and it was initiated by white people who recognized in black people a humanity that before they had not been willing to see or that they had not had the chance to see. In this same manner, the Underground Railroad serves

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