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Geordie's Mingin Medicine: George's Marvellous Medicine in Scots

Geordie's Mingin Medicine: George's Marvellous Medicine in Scots

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Geordie's Mingin Medicine: George's Marvellous Medicine in Scots

évaluations:
3.5/5 (19 évaluations)
Longueur:
101 pages
44 minutes
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Aug 18, 2016
ISBN:
9781845028916
Format:
Livre

Description

GEORDIE'S GRANNIE
WIS A GRABBIE CRABBIT
AULD WUMMAN WI
peeliewally broon teeth and
WEE SNIRKIT-UP
MOOTH like a
DUG’S BAHOOKIE.

As far as she’s concerned, Geordie can do nothing right. But when it’s time for him to give her a dose of her daily medicine, Geordie decides to mix up a concoction from his own recipe, with astonishing results! Sit back and watch what happens when Grannie takes a spoonful of Geordie’s magic broon brew in Matthew Fitt’s hilarious translation.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Aug 18, 2016
ISBN:
9781845028916
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

ROALD DAHL wis a spy, ace fechter pilot, chocolate historian and medical inventor. He wis the scriever o Chairlie and the Chocolate Works, Matilda, The BFG and mony mair braw stories. He’s aye THE WORLD’S NUMBER WAN STORYTELLER.

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Aperçu du livre

Geordie's Mingin Medicine - Roald Dahl

First published 2006 by Itchy Coo

ITCHY COO is an imprint and trade mark of James Francis Robertson and Matthew Fitt and used under licence by Black & White Publishing Limited.

Black & White Publishing Ltd

29 Ocean Drive, Edinburgh, Scotland EH6 6JL

www.blackandwhitepublishing.com

Reprinted 2009, 2010, 2012, 2016

This electronic edition published in 2016

ISBN 978 1 84502 891 6 in EPub format

ISBN 978 1 84502 160 3 in paperback

Originally published as George's Marvellous Medicine

by Jonathan Cape Ltd in 1980

Copyright © Roald Dahl Nominee Ltd 1981

Illustrations copyright © Quentin Blake 1981

Translation copyright © Matthew Fitt 2007

The right of Matthew Fitt to be identified as the translator of this work has been asserted by him in accordance with the Copyright,Designs and Patents Act 1988

A CIP record for this book is available from the British Library

Contents

Grannie

The Mervellous Ploy

Geordie Sterts tae Mak the Medicine

Peels for the Beasts

Geordie Biles It Up

Broon Pent

Grannie Taks the Medicine

The Broon Chookie

The Grumphie, the Stirks, the Sheep, the Pownie and the auld Mither-goat

A Cran for Grannie

Mr Kranky's Braw Idea

Mingin Medicine Nummer Twa

Mingin Medicine Nummer Three

Mingin Medicine Nummer Fower

Cheerio Grannie

WARNIN TAE READERS: Dinna try tae mak Geordie's Mingin Medicine yersels at hame. It micht be dangerous.

Grannie

'I'm gaun oot tae the clachan for the messages,' Geordie's mither said tae Geordie yin Setterday mornin. 'Sae be a guid laddie and dinna get up tae ony joukery-pawkery.'

That wis a glaikit thing tae say tae a wee laddie at ony time. Richt awa, Geordie wis wunnerin whit kind o joukery-pawkery he could get up tae.

'And dinna forget tae gie yer Grannie her medicine at eleeven o'clock,' the mither said. Then oot she gaed, steekin the back door ahint her.

Grannie, that wis doverin in her chair by the windae, opened yin wickit wee ee and said, 'Noo ye heard whit yer mither said, Geordie. Dinna forget ma medicine.'

'Naw, Grannie,' Geordie said.

'And jist you try and behave yersel for wance while she's awa.'

'Aye, Grannie,' Geordie said.

Geordie wis that bored he could greet. He didna hae a brither or a sister. His faither wis a fermer and the ferm they steyed on wis miles awa frae onywhere, sae there wis never ony bairns tae daff wi. He wis scunnered wi gawpin at grumphies and chookies and kye and sheep. He wis even mair scunnered at haein tae bide in the same hoose as yon gloomy auld golach o a Grannie. Lookin efter her aw by himsel wisna the spairkiest wey tae spend a Setterday mornin.

'Ye can mak me a braw tassie o tea for a stert,' Grannie said tae Geordie. 'That'll stap yer joukerypawkery for a wee while.'

'Aye, Grannie,' Geordie said.

Geordie couldna help no likin his Grannie. She wis a grabbie crabbit auld wumman. She had peeliewally broon teeth and a wee snirkit-up mooth like a dug's bahookie.

'Hoo mony sugars in yer tea the day, Grannie?' Geordie spiered her.

'Yin spoon,' she said. 'And nae milk.'

Maist grannies are douce, couthie, helpfu auld buddies, but no this yin. She spent aw day and ilka day sittin in her chair by the windae, and she wis aye compleenin, girnin, greetin, grummlin and mulligrumphin aboot somethin or ither. Never wance, no even on her brawest days, had she smiled at Geordie and said, 'Weel, Geordie, hoo are ye this mornin?' or 'Come on, we'll hae a gemm at Snakes and Ledders?' or 'Hoo did ye get on at the schuil the day?' She didna seem tae gie a toffee aboot ither folk, forby hersel. She wis a meeserable auld grumph.

Geordie gaed ben the kitchen

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Ce que les gens pensent de Geordie's Mingin Medicine

3.7
19 évaluations / 44 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    The story is about eight-year-old George, who is left at home with his unpleasant grandmother while his mother goes shopping. Dahl acknowledges that most Grandmas are nice people, but this one is one of his classic nasty creations, who treats her grandson very badly. I read this aloud to my three-year-old grandson and he liked it so much that he asked for it again a day later. The book quickly becomes silly, as George decides to make some new medicine, and fills a large pan with the contents of every bottle and can that he can find around the house. Each item is listed in some detail, much of which I skipped on my first reading aloud. The results are then bizarre, increasingly so towards the end. Recommended as a read-aloud to any child who likes short chapter books with line drawings every few pages, and who appreciates the bizarre and absurd. Also good for fluently reading children; the intended readership is probably for those around seven to nine years old.
  • (5/5)
    fantastic read
  • (4/5)
    When George's parents are away for the day, George is responsible for giving his Grandma her dose of medicine. But the medicine never seems to do his horrid, grouchy grandma any good, so he decides to mix up a batch of his own that will either make her nice or disappear. Throwing in a little or a lot of most household stuff he can get his hands on makes for a marvelous medicine. I had read George's Marvelous Medicine as a kid and I must say the rereading didn't disappoint. The writing was charming and lyrical and the artwork was fun. Several of the descriptions made me laugh out loud - like George's grandma is a grizzly, grumpy, selfish old woman with pale brown teeth and a small puckered-up mouth like a dog's bottom. I did read it a little different as an adult; I was thinking about how much the medicine was costing as George kept dumping perfumes and animal pills in the pot. And all the ideas this could give a kid!
  • (4/5)
    Slightly predictable but funny still, a joy to read.
  • (4/5)
    In George's Marvelous Medicine by Roald Dahl, George is a little boy who's grandma always tells him that he's growing too fast. He couldn't help growing too fast and that's why he really hates his grandma. George makes a medicine to try to fix his grandma but it doesn't go as planned. It's a really nice book and it's funny reading about what actually happens to his grandma after George secretly gives the medicine to his grandma. It's a very funny and unusual book and I definitely recommend reading it if you like unusual things happening in a story. I absolutely love the books by Roald Dahl!
  • (3/5)
    When George Kranky is left alone with his vicious maternal grandmother, and he gets the notion in his head to poison her, things get a little weird. Wavering between wanting to kill her and wanting to just knock her socks off, he blends all manner of ingredients whose warning labels typically say “In case of accidental ingestion, contact the poison control center.” The end result, though, is his marvelous medicine, which, instead of killing his grandmother, gives her great height. When his parents notice that it also increases the size of the family’s farm’s livestock, George’s father demands that George reproduce the wonderdrug. However, George is not a big pharmaceutical company with rigorous quality control and confguration management practices, so he spends the rest of the book trying to re-create his marvelous medicine.I found this book to be one I would hesitate reading to a child. While it has the strong message of “stay the heck out of the medicine cabinet,” it does nothing to counteract the message of “poison the elderly.” I’d be too afraid of a child taking this book to heart, and getting a chemical cocktail for breakfast (or even worse, them creating chlorine gas by accident).I’m sure the book can be read in good fun, but the general theme seems like one not best delivered to children, unless they’re smart enough to realize that such a thing wouldn’t happen. This book probably should have the poison control hotline’s number printed on the back or something.As far as the prose itself goes, I found the story to be a bit dull and at times excessively dark. George is certainly no Charlie or James. In my mind, this goes up there with other misses by Dahl, which sad to say, has been roughly 50% of the books of his I’ve read.
  • (3/5)
    A fantastic use of words that allow the younger reader to engage in a short, humourous read.
  • (3/5)
    A lesser Dahl, but good fun nevertheless. Not perhaps one that ages with the reader as well as others.
  • (5/5)
    george is up to some tricks when he puts tons of things together to make a potion for his mean old aunt/grandma. dahl's a great lister, and the things he puts into the concoction is marvelous indeed.
  • (3/5)
    I love this story although it is actually twisted. It makes me wonder what was going on in Dahl's mind.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favoirte of Roald Dahl's books. It is inventive, clever, with a slight hint of malice, which is what I love about Dahl's books. A very funny book that has the main characteristic of all Dahl's books that the children are brilliant and the adults all slightly dumb and daft. George's marvelous medicine is fun for all ages as most of Dahl's books are. Its also fun to read aloud if your teaching someone to read.
  • (5/5)
    This book is about George's marvelous madicine.He made a medicine but it make you tall and short and so on... This book is very fun to read.. I promise you that you will love this book.
  • (5/5)
    Classic, zany fantasy story from the incomparable Roald Dahl. Children will squeal with delight and groan with disgust as George raids every room in the farmhouse to create his crazy medicinal concoction for grandma. Quentin Blake's whimsical drawings are perfect, as always, but the real standout, is Dahl's use of language and how he skillfully deploys his trademark sequences of synonyms - not only to provide humour, but to extend and expand the reader's or listener's vocabulary. An all-time favorite for both children and adults. Makes a great read-aloud or Readers' Theatre production.
  • (4/5)
    George's Marvelous Medcine is about a little boy called George Kranky and his mother and father go out, and George has to give his grandma her Medcine at 11:00.He looks at the bottle and thinks then his grandma asks for some tea so he makes her some tea but forgets the saucer and the spoon so bak he goes to the kitchen.He has an idea to give her a diffrent medcine and it is really funny.
  • (3/5)
    George's concoction should have killed grandma, but instead it has more surprising and hilarious jokes. Dahl's tales hardly turn out how we expect and going with it is where the fun lies.
  • (4/5)
    George’s grandmother is a really nasty piece of work. One day, George is left on his own to look after her, and after being nagged once too often, he decides to get revenge and using various items he finds lying around the house, he creates a disgusting potion to give to her in place of her usual medicine.

    Here’s where the fun really begins as the medicine has all sorts of different effects on Grandma - George must try to make medicine to make her shrink again. He mixes and blends and combines the various ‘ingredients’ he used in his original blend to try to find a cure, but this might prove difficult…

    In the days of ‘PC gone mad’ I’m sure there are plenty of people who frown upon this story, although the book does contain a message in the front just before the story starts warning children not to try making their own medicine at home! As an adult, I love the dark nature of Dahl’s stories. This one is one of my favourites so far!
  • (5/5)
    Another imaginative story by Roald Dahl.

    George's grandmother is always ordering him around. Get this, do that, go here, and complaining. She is never happy.

    What if he could come up with a new medicine that would make her happy? Or make her go away?

    A quick read for an adult, but fun. Definitly from a child's point of view.
  • (4/5)
    So Grandma is disabled and suffers from dwarfism and chronic pain. She scares George and he sets out to poison her. A deeply subversive novel that encourages children to play around with chemicals under the sink and perform experiments on animals. Great stuff.
  • (3/5)
    George’s Marvelous Medicine is a Roald Dahl classic. It is cute and funny but not one of my favorites of Dahl’s (I tend to prefer his books for older kids). I also got a little queasy at the idea of encouraging kids to mix household cleaners and motor oil together as a medicine. Most children will realize that it’s just humor, but this book is written for a rather young audience and some kids may still be adventurous enough to try something similar themselves. In short, make sure you know what your kid is reading, and have pertinent discussions about truth and fantasy. In the unlikely scenario that you don’t know anything about Roald Dahl: he has a dark (and gross) sense of humor. His books tend to be a bit silly plot-wise, but children just gobble them up. Dahl is a great writer for getting kids interested in reading. He has written a range of books for younger and older kids, and this book is for perhaps 6-8 year olds. If you don’t mind a bit of gross yuckiness and a wide range of purposefully unlikable adult characters, Roald Dahl has written some great ones!
  • (4/5)
    Re-read this book after talking about childhood authors and thoroughly enjoyed it again.
  • (3/5)
    There is something about Raold Dahl's books that are delightful, and yet sinister in an awkward kind of way. George's Marvelous Medicine is one of those works. Dahl's story contains a single child George acting in a mean spirited manner to a family member he doesn't like.Giving his nasty, selfish grandmother a brewing concoction of medicine, she grows to un-heavenly heights and then using marvelous medicine number four, George and his father shrink granny out of existence.Interestingly, dad helps to get rid of maternal granny while mommy looks on asking "Where is she?" "I've lost her!" "Hooray" says Mr. Kranky. Daddy teaches George that when people are grumpy and nasty spirited, you simply poison them.I don't particularly like the moral of the story.But, I will continue to read Dahl's books because some of them are so creative.
  • (4/5)
    What more can I say other than Roald Dahl is a writing genius! Again, Dahl delivers a fun, humorous and creative story spun with magic and wonder. If only I could tap into his writing muse and channel his creativity my way. The characters are fun, simple yet memorable. The descriptions are carefully crafted and consistent with Dahl's collection of colorful stories. This book is yet another example of how Dahl takes the time to include the simplest detail in which helps the reader to imagine the characters so alive and in color. This book is silly, gross, fun and simply wonderful! If you want to have some fun with kids, read this story.
  • (3/5)
    Not my favorite Dahl book, but still a cute, quirky read.
  • (3/5)
    This edition, "Geordie's Mingin Medicine" is a translation into Scots dialect of Roald Dahl's humourous fantasy tale for children, "George's Marvelous Medicine". From the jacket notes on the Itchy Coo edition, "Geordie's Grannie wis a grabbie crabbit ault wumman wi peeliewally broon teeth and a wee snirkit-up mooth like a dug's bahookie. She wis aye compleenin, girnin, greetin, grummlin and mulligrumphin aboot somethin or ither. She wis a meeserable auld grumph." And so the story continues, in the vernacular Scots dialect which is seldom heard now except when speaking to elderly Scots in certain regions. Best enjoyed when read aloud by a Scotsman or woman who can go with the flow, make the most of the dialect, and enjoy the wild exaggerations and hilarious events of the story.
  • (3/5)
    The main character of the book is George and he tries to get rid of his grandma by making a medicine of everything he can find. This story is funny because he gets every thing he can and puts it in the medicine pot. You would like this story if you like funny books and weird ones too.
  • (5/5)
    This book is interesting and filled with good humor. I would recommend this book to everybody both young and old. I like how Roald Dahl writes his stories and I also enjoy his variety of interesting word choice.
  • (4/5)
    One of the better shorter Roald Dahl chapter books, this one is about a boy who concocts a marvelous medicine that his grandmother greedily takes, ending up with some problematic consequences--that only get more problematic as his greedy father encourages him to reproduce his medicine and his grandmother ends up taking George's Marvelous Medicine Number Four with even worse consequences.
  • (4/5)
    George’s Marvelous Medicine. By Roald Dahl. Illustrated by Quentin Blake. Puffin. 1980. 96 pages. 978-0142410356. Grades 2-5.Left alone with his odious grandmother, George cooks up a magical concoction, composed of a whole host of household items (from hairspray and horseradish sauce to animal pills and antifreeze), to replace his grandmother’s medicine – not realizing the crazy consequences it will have. Dahl’s recurring theme of children’s triumph over malevolent adults is an enjoyable one for young readers. Blake’s scratchy line drawings help carry the story’s plot, even in their simplicity – his spiky-haired, claw-fingered grandmother is a perfect witch of a woman. The book’s language is expressive and fanciful, but the illustrations help make the work accessible for all readers – and the work would also make an entertaining read-aloud for a group of grade school children. The universality of Dahl’s themes and his grasp of childhood emotion have helped this work age well: its irreverent approach to adult figures makes it a timeless classic for young readers.
  • (4/5)
    I can’t remember much about “George's Marvellous Medicine”, as I read it when at primary school, but I do recall how popular Roald Dahl was with most if not all of the class, and this book was amongst the most popular. For that reason I’m rating this four stars and hope I’m not being unjustified.I either read this or had it read to me (the equivalent to an audio book) or both somewhere from 1983-85, thus I’ve put 1984 as reading dates as an average. I will have read/heard a few of Mr Dahl’s books during this period, of which some titles I can’t remember at all.If I had to or wanted to re-read any children’s books for some reason or other then I’d definitely opt for works by this author. All these years on and he’s left a very faint yet happy memories in the back of my mind.
  • (4/5)
    This is are fantasy book. It makes your imagination go wild I recommend this book for year 3, 4,5, 6.