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The Old Woman Who Named Things

The Old Woman Who Named Things

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The Old Woman Who Named Things

évaluations:
4/5 (12 évaluations)
Longueur:
34 pages
29 minutes
Sortie:
Aug 18, 2015
ISBN:
9780547543017
Format:
Livre

Description

How does an old woman who has outlived all her friends keep from being lonely? By naming the things in her life she knows she will never outlive—like her house, Franklin, and her bed, Roxanne. When a shy brown puppy appears at her front gate, the old woman won’t name it, because it might not outlive her. Tender watercolors capture the charm of this heartwarming story of an old woman who doesn’t know she’s lonely until she meets a plucky puppy who needs a name—and someone to love. “Rylant and Brown together create with affection and lovingly humorous touches a glimpse of old age lived with relish.” —Booklist
Sortie:
Aug 18, 2015
ISBN:
9780547543017
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Cynthia Rylant is the author of more than 100 books for young people, including the beloved Henry and Mudge, Annie and Snowball, Brownie & Pearl, Motor Mouse, and Mr. Putter & Tabby series. Her novel Missing May received the Newbery Medal. She lives in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

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Aperçu du livre

The Old Woman Who Named Things - Cynthia Rylant

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Ce que les gens pensent de The Old Woman Who Named Things

4.2
12 évaluations / 10 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    Fearful of losing any more names in her life, a lonely woman lives quietly with inanimate companions she has named: her house Franklin, her car Betsy, her bed Roxanne. When a stray puppy wanders to her gate one day, she doesn't turn him away--or name him. Rylant's lovely poetic prose makes for a beautiful read-aloud. Kathryn Brown's rendering of the main character as a quirky, cowboy-wearing, bun-donning elderly woman temper other characteristics of the woman's shrunken features which might frighten younger listeners. Through the heart-warming final pages, readers are filled with a deep sense of loss and longing, as well as the hope that accompanies the risk of loving and being loved. This book is a masterpiece worthy of being read over and over again and also of sharing with readers of all ages. Highly recommended for 5-99+!
  • (4/5)
    When all of her friends die away, what else is a little old lady supposed to do besides name her things? There's a car named Betsy and a bed named Roxanne. The old woman knows that these things will not die before her and is content with having them as her friends. Then the day comes when a small brown puppy comes to her gate looking for food. The old woman feels pity for the pup and feeds him, but quickly turns him away. This continues until the day the brown puppy, now a dog, does not show up at the old woman's gate. The only woman realizes that she misses her actual friend and sets out to town to find him.
  • (3/5)
    A lonely old woman, having outlived all of her friends, and being reluctant to allow new ones into her life, for fear that she might lose them as well, takes to naming her inanimate possessions in this sweet picture-book about taking a chance on love and companionship. When a shy brown puppy pokes his head into her yard, she feeds him and sends him on his way. After all, Franklin (her house) doesn't need any dog hair, Roxanne (her bed) isn't wide enough for a canine companion, Fred (her chair) doesn't permit puppies to sit upon him, and Betsy (her car) makes animals sick. Despite her discouragement, the puppy comes back every day, eventually growing into a dog. And then one day, he doesn't show up...A heartwarming tale of loneliness and fear, and how they are conquered by love, The Old Woman Who Named Things has a most satisfactory conclusion: something that is never really in much doubt (at least in my mind, anyway), but that is still very enjoyable to see. The watercolor artwork by Kathryn Brown is immensely appealing, with a quirky sensibility (I love the old lady's hairdo!) that amuses, and some moments of real pathos (the sweet little puppy!). All in all, an engaging book, one I recommend to young animal lovers, to children who long for a pet, or to children who are afraid of opening up and making friends.
  • (2/5)
    An old woman who has outlived all her friends is reluctant to become to attached to the stray dog that visits her each day.
  • (4/5)
    The illustrator done a great job presenting the pictures for this text. The author has written a great story about an old woman who has outlived all her special friends. She begins to name all the items in her house because they cannot die. A little puppy shows up at her home but she refuses to name it for fear it might die. She feeds it daily but does not want to get emotionally attached for fear that it might leave her too.
  • (5/5)
    There once was a old woman that out lived all her friends so she began to name the things around her she wouldn't out live. Until one day a puppy befriended her he came to see her everyday but she never named him until one day he didn't come to visit her. She was worried so she called the dog catcher and found him there she took him home and named him.Age 4 and upDuPont Library
  • (3/5)
    This book is about an old woman who has outlived all of her friends. She names all of her possesions like her car, house, chair, etc. because these are things tha she can not outlive. One day a puppy comes to her fence, but she fed it and told it to go home. Everyday the puppy would come back for a year. The old woman did not want to name or keep the dog because it was something she could outlive and that it was too sad outliving everything she loved. One day the dog did not come to her fence. This makes her sad so she goes to the pound and looks for the dog. The dog is there, she takes him home and names him lucky.
  • (4/5)
    This is a cute picture book about an old lady who named things that she would not be able to outlive. She was fortunate to live a long life, but all of her friends with names had died, so she stopped naming things she might lose. Then one day a dog starts to come to her house. She feeds him and sends him away. However, he continues to come back every day and every day she feeds him, but she refuses to give him a name. Then one day the dog doesn't come back, and the old lady starts to realize she might want to keep him around. It's fun to see how their relationship grows. It shows that fear shouldn't hold us back from loving somebody. The illustrations are beautiful. They portray the emotion and the scenery really well. I'd like to have this book available to students in my classroom.
  • (3/5)
    This would be a good book for the lower grades. It is about an old woman who is lonely and scared to have friends because all of her friends have died and left her behind. Now, the lady only wants to name or get close to things that will out live her. One day when a puppy shows up she doesn't want to get attached because she might out live it. She ends up feeding it every day. One day the dog doesn't show up for a few days and the old lady is lonely again. she then decides that she is going to find the dog, she does, and names him lucky.
  • (5/5)
    Good job it is so amazing l love it ?