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The Children's Writer's Guide 2

The Children's Writer's Guide 2

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The Children's Writer's Guide 2

Longueur:
111 pages
1 heure
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jan 22, 2018
ISBN:
9780995940390
Format:
Livre

Description

The Children’s Writer’s Guide 2 is ideal for writers not just of books for children and young adults, but also features information that’s applicable to writers in all genres. The first installment of The Children’s Writer’s Guide has a wealth of tips and advice, including suggestions regarding how to get started as a writer, dealing with writer’s block, conducting research, choosing appropriate names for your characters, the editing and revision process, as well as the world of marketing and promotion.

This second book further explores the writing process, examining topics such as developing memorable characters, creating effective dialogue, the importance of book covers, the value of blogging, age levels and appropriate content for books for children and young adults, networking, and the process of submitting your work to publishing houses.

In combination with The Children’s Writer’s Guide, this second book provides invaluable advice and support for both established and aspiring authors of books for children and young adults.

Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jan 22, 2018
ISBN:
9780995940390
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Simon Rose is a musician, author and researcher from London, England based in Berlin, Germany. He performs on baritone and alto saxophones in numerous collaborations and as soloist. He also collaborates beyond music with dancers, visual artists, mixed media, built instruments, site specific performance and more. His research interest is in creative processes.


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The Children's Writer's Guide 2 - Simon Rose

The Children’s Writer’s Guide 2

Working as an Author for Children and Young Adults

By

Simon Rose

The Children’s Writer’s Guide 2

Copyright © 2018 by Simon Rose

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without written permission from the publisher, except for the use of brief quotations for the purpose of a book review. For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, please contact Simon Rose at sorcerersletterbox@gmail.com

Published by Sorcerer's Letterbox Publishing

Calgary, Alberta

www.simon-rose.com

Print ISBN: 978-0995940383

Ebook ISBN: 978-0995940390

Thanks to Isobelle Davenport for her invaluable help with this book.

Table of Contents

Title Page

Introduction

Chapter One: Writing What You Know

Chapter Two: Editing Your Own Work

Editing Issues

Dialogue

Punctuation and Tenses

Description

Characters

Story Synopsis

Chapter Three: People Plotting

Finding Characters

Making a Difference

The Real World

Chapter Four: Dynamic Dialogue

Is Said Dead?

Adverbs and Adjectives

Dialogue and Description

Who is Speaking?

Almost Realistic

Chapter Five: The Importance of Book Covers

Attracting Attention

Packaging Products

Chapter Six: A Story in One Paragraph

Chapter Seven: Age Levels and Word Counts

Board Books

Early Picture Books

Picture Books

Nonfiction Picture Books

Early Readers

First Chapter Books

Chapter Books

Middle-grade Books

Young Adult (YA) Novels

Chapter Eight: Age-appropriate Material

Relationships

Swearing

Violence

Chapter Nine: Study Guides and Resources

Inspiration and Imagination

Workshops and Creative Writing Exercises

Chapter Ten: The Value of Blogging

Blog Word Counts

Post Frequency

The Importance of Good Content

Blog Tours

Topics to Cover

All About You

Chapter Eleven: Networking and Writers Groups

Membership in Groups

Maintaining Connections

Online Groups

Feedback

Networks

Chapter Twelve: Submitting Your Work

Researching Publishers

Cover Letter

Synopsis

The Time Camera Synopsis

Sample Chapters

The Time Camera – Sample chapters

Conclusion

About the Author

Books by Simon Rose

Fiction

Non-fiction

Anthologies

Introduction

The Children’s Writer’s Guide 2 is ideal for writers not just of books for children and young adults, but also features information that’s applicable to writers in all genres. The first installment of The Children’s Writer’s Guide has a wealth of tips and advice, including suggestions regarding how to get started as a writer, dealing with writer's block, conducting research, choosing appropriate names for your characters, the editing and revision process, as well as the world of marketing and promotion.

In this second book, I further explore the writing process, examining topics such as developing memorable characters, creating effective dialogue, the importance of book covers, the value of blogging, age levels and appropriate content for books for children and young adults, networking, and the process of submitting your work to publishing houses.

In combination with The Children’s Writer’s Guide, this second book provides invaluable advice and support for both established and aspiring authors of books for children and young adults.

Chapter One: Writing What You Know

In terms of writing and publishing trends, even though the height of the Harry Potter phenomenon is now long gone, there doesn’t seem to be any shortage of books with similar fantasy themes. I’m in bookstores in Calgary conducting signings on a regular basis and a large percentage of the books that children and young adults seem to enjoy are in the fantasy genre. These stories don’t always involve wizards and dragons and that kind of thing but magic is usually part of the story. This appears to be an ongoing trend although vampires, elves, and zombies seem to be less popular than they used to be. Steampunk mostly appears in adult novels but there have been books published in this genre for teens and YA in recent years. The paranormal is also quite popular these days, but how long that trend lasts is unknown, of course.

As an author it’s really up to you what you decide to write about, but I always find it’s best to write about what you know or at least about something that you’re interested in. It’s much harder to write a novel to satisfy a current trend if you dislike or are uninterested in the topic or genre. For example, my own books cover such areas as fantasy, science fiction, the paranormal, time travel, superheroes, parallel universes, alternate realities, historical fiction, and a few other themes. These are the things I’m interested in writing about so that makes it easier to develop the story ideas but also to actually create the novels.

I do write lots of nonfiction books on topics that may not always be my favourites and which involve considerable research but that’s a little different, more like writing magazine articles or being a business writer or journalist. I probably wouldn’t write a book about fishing, sailing, mountain climbing, farming, most sports, horses, and several other topics, although these things might crop up in a book as part of the plot. I prefer to stick with what interests and inspires me, which makes the writing process much more enjoyable.

I should clarify that this doesn’t mean that you have to pigeonhole yourself. If you come from a small town does that mean you can never write about life in a big city? If you live on a farm in a rural area, can you never compose a gritty crime drama set in New York? You should always strive to stretch yourself creatively. Everyone develops as a writer as they work on their stories and most writers usually become more proficient at their craft as they continue to create new work.

Writing what you know refers to what interests or intrigues you rather than what you’re qualified to do. As I mentioned, my nonfiction work has often been on topics with which I’m less familiar and involved considerable research, similar to that conducted by journalists when completing an article for a magazine or an online publication. Yet research also has to be completed

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