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The Changing Concept of Reality in Art

The Changing Concept of Reality in Art

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The Changing Concept of Reality in Art

Longueur:
151 pages
1 heure
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jan 28, 2013
ISBN:
9781611458602
Format:
Livre

Description

"The transmutation of artistic form," writes Erwin Rosenthal, "depends on individual decisions and cultural development. But there are basic laws of self-expression which do not change, which are perpetual because they accord with the structure of the human mind and soul." These penetrating studies explore the deep psychological and formal affinities between defining figures of their epochs—from Giotto and Dante through Picasso—and illuminate ways that artists and thinkers encounter the world and translate it through the unique language of imagination.

The principal sections of this important book are:

·Giotto and Dante

·Picasso, Painter and Engraver

·Giotto and Picasso

·The Condition of Modern Art and Thought
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Jan 28, 2013
ISBN:
9781611458602
Format:
Livre

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The Changing Concept of Reality in Art - Deborah Rosenthal

E.R.

I

GIOTTO

AND

DANTE

In discussing the foremost poet and the foremost painter of the Middle Ages together, it is clear that it is not our intention here to present a detailed treatment of the poetry of Dante and the painting of Giotto. It would be particularly desirable to make a thorough analysis of Giotto’s painting — of his contributions to the fields of formal principles and spatial relationships. Here, however, we will limit ourselves to examining his art in the light of mediaeval thought. This approach will reveal the painter’s problems as an intrinsic element in the predominant cultural development of his age. Thus, the transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional space and the growth of natural, individual form are seen as phenomena which arise out of the unfolding process of humanization. In this way, we intend to show how, at a particular moment in history, a very great poet and a very great painter are symbolic of an era and how their works have had a powerful influence upon the intellectual growth of the world. Not every epoch possesses artists who embrace the meaning of an entire period. Yet, in the year 1300, living near one another and of almost the same age, we find Dante and Giotto, whose works have become a great manifestation of mediaeval life and thought.

Giotto di Bondone and Dante Alighieri were both born in Florence in the late thirteenth century. At this time Paris was the center of European intellectual life, and Italy had been forced to relinquish many of her most important personalities to the universities of France. About the time of the birth of both Dante and Giotto, Thomas Aquinas was lecturing before crowds of eager listeners at the Sorbonne, and his most celebrated colleague, Bonaventura, had likewise been summoned from his Italian homeland to Paris. Of these remarkable new forces in philosophy and art we shall speak later. Above all, new problems were developed which were, in turn, carried back to Italy and there occupied the most creative minds. While Dante and Giotto were growing to maturity, everywhere in Italy new currents of thought were pushing to the surface. This was the period of the flourishing and bellicose Communes, of free cities, centers of culture and independence. Tuscany rose to prominence and prosperous 13 th century Florence spanned the Arno with three new bridges to cope with the increase in traffic. There was vigorous activity in politics and letters, and in the lively discussions French and Provencal were to be heard along with Italian and Latin. Elements from neighbouring lands were absorbed into the native culture, particularly the fresh ideas which were flowing in from France. What had so far been a history of art void of names had turned into a history of artists, for painters and poets now rose as tangible personalities. A considerable number of young writers gathered there and zealously occupied themselves with the creation of new literary concepts ; for the first time, personal and individual experiences were cast into poetic

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