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Geronimo: The True Story of America's Most Ferocious Warrior

Geronimo: The True Story of America's Most Ferocious Warrior

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Geronimo: The True Story of America's Most Ferocious Warrior

Longueur:
194 pages
1 heure
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Feb 14, 2011
ISBN:
9781626366848
Format:
Livre

Description

First published in 1906, Geronimo is the collaborative work between Geronimo, chief of the Chiricahua Apache, and author S. M. Barrett. The latter was given special permission from President Theodore Roosevelt to interview Geronimo while he was a prisoner of war at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. What Barrett recorded is a blunt, firsthand account of the twenty-five years Geronimo spent fighting the U.S. government.

In Geronimo, the famous Native American discusses the history of the Apache people—where they came from, their early life, and their tribal customs and manners. Geronimo expresses his personal views on how the white men who settled in the West negatively affected his tribe, from wrongs done to his people and removal from their homeland to Geronimo’s imprisonment and forced surrender.

“I am thankful that the President of the United States has given me permission to tell my story. I hope that he and those in authority under him will read my story and judge whether my people have been rightly treated.” —Geronimo

This is the perfect book for anyone interested in the history of America and its native peoples, and this true-life account—from one of the most well-known figures in our country’s history—is both thrilling and sobering.
Éditeur:
Sortie:
Feb 14, 2011
ISBN:
9781626366848
Format:
Livre

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work.

PART I

THE APACHES

CHAPTER I

ORIGIN OF THE APACHE INDIANS

IN the beginning the world was covered with darkness. There was no sun, no day. The perpetual night had no moon or stars. There were, however, all manner of beasts and birds. Among the beasts were many hideous, nameless monsters, as well as dragons, lions, tigers, wolves, foxes, beavers, rabbits, squirrels, rats, mice, and all manner of creeping things such as lizards and serpents. Mankind could not prosper under such conditions, for the beasts and serpents destroyed all human offspring.

All creatures had the power of speech and were gifted with reason.

There were two tribes of creatures: the birds or the feathered tribe and the beasts. The former were organized under their chief, the eagle.

These tribes often held councils, and the birds wanted light admitted. This the beasts repeatedly refused to do. Finally the birds made war against the beasts.

The beasts were armed with clubs, but the eagle had taught his tribe to use bows and arrows. The serpents were so wise that they could not all be killed. One took refuge in a perpendicular cliff of a mountain in Arizona, and his eye (changed into a brilliant stone) may be seen in that rock to this day. The bears, when killed, would each be changed into several other bears, so that the more bears the feathered tribe killed, the more there were. The dragon could not be killed, either, for he was covered with four coats of horny scales, and the arrows would not penetrate these. One of the most hideous, vile monsters (nameless) was proof against arrows, so the eagle flew high up in the air with a round, white stone, and let it fall on this monster’s head, killing him instantly. This was such a good service that the stone was called sacred. (A symbol of this stone is used in the tribal game of Kah.¹) They fought for many days, but at last the birds won the victory.

After this war was over, although some evil beasts remained, the birds were able to control the councils, and light was admitted. Then mankind could live and prosper. The eagle was chief in this good fight: therefore, his feathers were worn by man as emblems of wisdom, justice, and power.

Among the few human beings that were yet alive was a woman who had been blessed with many children, but these had always been destroyed by the beasts. If by any means she succeeded in eluding the others, the dragon, who was very wise and very evil, would come himself and eat her babes.

After many years a son of the rainstorm was born to her and she dug for him a deep cave. The entrance to this cave she closed and over the spot built a camp fire. This concealed the babe’s hiding place and kept him warm. Every day she would remove the fire and descend into the cave, where the child’s bed was, to nurse him; then she would return and rebuild the camp

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