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White Socks Only

White Socks Only

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White Socks Only

évaluations:
4.5/5 (28 évaluations)
Longueur:
34 pages
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1996
ISBN:
9780807593615
Format:
Livre

Description

In the segregated south, a young girl thinks that she can drink from a fountain marked "Whites Only" because she is wearing her white socks.
Sortie:
Jan 1, 1996
ISBN:
9780807593615
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Evelyn Coleman believes unicorns are real and that one day she will return to her own planet. In the meantime, she has written more than ten award-winning books in different genres, from picture books to middle grade to YA to adult thrillers. She was the president of the Mystery Writers of America and is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. Her book Freedom Train was on Georgia Center for the Book’s inaugural list of 25 Books All Young Georgians Should Read, and Shadows on SocietyHill was nominated for an Edgar Award. Coleman has written several books for American Girl, including her most recent novel, The Cameo Necklace, a mystery about the doll Cécile. 

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White Socks Only - Evelyn Coleman

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Ce que les gens pensent de White Socks Only

4.3
28 évaluations / 27 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this book for a few reasons. First, I enjoyed the "story telling" aspect. The grandmother was sharing a story with her granddaughter, I think that makes it very easy for children to relate to. They can recount a time they had a parent or grandparent tell them a story from their childhood. Next, I enjoyed the history and multicultural aspect. It briefly teaches readers about life for African Americans before the Civil Rights Movement. Finally, I enjoyed the innocence of the story. The young girl didn't realize the "whites only" sign was referring to the color of your skin, not the color of your socks. It really makes readers realize just how ridiculous the laws were during the time of segregation. I think the big idea of this book is to teach readers about life for African Americans during segregation, but also to emphasize how crazy the laws were and somewhat poke fun at them. It also allows readers to question, why would ONLY people wearing white socks be allowed to drink from that water fountain? Similarly, why were ONLY white people allowed to drink from certain water fountains. This can be taken a step further to teach students the other ways blacks were segregated.
  • (4/5)
    The idea of the story is to bring forth the topic of segregation. I liked this book for a few reasons. First, the combination of the language, point of view, and characters made the story realistic. The story started out in the first person point of view of the granddaughter and switched to first person point of view of the grandmother telling her story. The story was written using words the characters would actually say, which also helped make the characters believable. For example, when the granddaughter asked to go to town by herself, the grandmother responded with "You know you ain't big enough to go to town on your own, girl." By using the word "ain't", the author shows the realism of the dialogue. I also liked the illustrations in the book. Another reason I liked the books was the issue it pushes readers to think about. Segregation like the story tells does not exist in America anymore. Some readers may not understand why the sign "white only" was so important. The story teaches children to think about different times and struggles from what they are used to.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book. I really liked the plot of the book because it showed how radical and arrogant used to be back when racism existed. I also liked the illustrations because the unique look made the characters that much more dramatic. It helped show the hurt amongst the black people and how they stood up for themselves. The main idea is to stand up for what you believe in.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book a lot. I like how the author used a voice that the reader could tell was an older southern woman telling the story, "I sneaked into town once. Yep, all by myself.." language like this put the reader into the time period which the story was taking place. I also like how the authored showed the innocence of the girl happy and walking into town to just simply do something fun on a hot day. Also, the author showed her innocence because she thought that the sign "Whites Only" meant only her white socks. It was a powerful message portrayed when the author included how each of the black people came to the little girls assistance when she was down. The main message of this story was subtle and came at the end, she went against the rules of that town and made a difference by doing so.
  • (4/5)
     An absolutely beautiful story, if not a bit unrealistic. Too bad civil rights issues weren't solved as easily in the real world as they were in this book. I loved how it twisted around the conflict to show just how ridiculous segregation was (or is, depending on your location in the world).
  • (5/5)
    One little girl's confusion leads to a stance on civil rights. The story has a very natural story telling flow and makes kids think about how silly it is that only certain people can use certain things.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this book because it showed a real perspective. It mixed the cruelty of racism with the innocence of a young child. The author did a great job of showing the perspective of a child. The story details a young girl who simply wanted a drink from the fountain. It said "whites only". A naive child thought that this meant white socks only. Because she doesn't understand why someone wouldn't be allowed to drink water. A very scary white man comes and yells at her and pushed her. This causes man African Americans to come to her defense and drink from the fountain as well. I liked the message from this book. It showed readers how ridicules it is to discriminate against others, we are all human after all. It also taught readers to fight and stand up for what you believe in.
  • (4/5)
    This is a very powerful story about an African American grandmother telling her granddaughter a story of her youth. When she was a young girl, she went into town on a very hot afternoon. On her way back, she decides to get a drink at a "Whites Only" water fountain, mistaking the sign to mean white socks. She takes on her shoes so she is in her socks and begins to get a drink when a white man grabs her and threatens to beat her. Other African Americans take a stand and begin to take off their shoes also. The sign is taken down forever. I liked this story. It is powerful and when teaching about segregation and what it was like, this book would be a great tool. In the classroom, I would use this story to encourage respect when it came to different cultures and diversities. I would ask students what are some ways that we can celebrate our difference? What can they do to change some people's negative attitudes toward people who are different from them?
  • (4/5)
    This story is about a young girl who was curious to see if a egg could fry on the side walk on a hot day. This is a historical story that bring us social issues and segregation that was present in the past. The story was a movement for the civil right movement.
  • (4/5)
    The story of a young girl who goes into town by herself and takes a drink from a “Whites Only” water fountain and is scolded by a white man for doing so. All the black people in town gathered around and took drinks from the fountain until the white man had no choice but to back down. A story of the struggles faced by African Americans through segregation and of everyone’s right for equality.As a student this story takes me on a journey back in time to the days when racism is out in the open. i like the illustrations, and the story was pretty good. It made me very sad to see what happened to this little girl. Great bookAs a teacher this book is a great way to show my students what racism was like in the 50s. I believe my students shoul know what happened in that time.
  • (4/5)
    Racism makes no sense what so ever, especially through the eyes of a child. This is the main idea that this book aims to express. The carefree innocent actions of one young girl inspires a group of people to fight against the status quo in the name of equality and freedom. A little girl who reads a sign that says "Whites Only" hanging on a water fountain is so unaware of the harsh truth of racism that she assumes it means white socks only. She has white socks on and so assumes that she is allowed to drink from the fountain. This shows that people are not born with hate, that it is a learned quality and serves no purpose. Change can even be spurred by an unknowing child, too unaware to be fearful of consequences.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed reading this book. It is a very dramatic and emotional story that paints a vivid picture of how life was like for African-Americans during the time of Jim Crow Laws. I like how the story addresses how a little girl would perceive segregation of the time and how confusing it must have been to a lot of children. I especially like how the community takes a stand in a non-violent manner. The big message of this story is to shed light on the time of segregation and to show that people can change the world for the better without resorting to violence.
  • (5/5)
    White Socks OnlyBy Evelyn Coleman (1996)I liked White Socks Only by Evelyn Coleman for two reasons. First, I liked the generational storytelling that existed between the young girl and her grandma. Specifically, the young girl asked her grandma if she could walk in to town by herself, and the grandma responded to her granddaughter by saying, “you ain’t big enough.” Following her comment, the grandma proceeded to tell her granddaughter a personal story, which signified her reason for disapproval. Fortunately, the young girl learned a lesson from her grandma’s story. Second, I liked how Evelyn Coleman portrayed the grandma as an innocent child. For example, when the grandma went in to town by herself as a young girl, she made an innocent mistake. In short, she drank from a water fountain that read, “whites only.” She believed she could do so if she took off her shoes, and wore her white socks, so she did. Unluckily, she was punished for her mistake; she was whipped. Commonly though, children make wrong interpretations, which lead to negative consequences, just like the grandma’s incident. Overall, the “big idea” of White Socks Only is to not disobey your elders when they tell you no—the grandma disobeyed her mother as a child and was severely affected by her choice to do so.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book for the illustrations and the characters. The illustrations fits what is written. For example, when the Chicken Man walks up to the water fountain and takes off his shoes. The illustrations match what is being read. The characters are also believable. The grandma in the story could have impacted history and be a reason that the "Whites Only" sign got taken down. The big idea of this story is the power of standing for what you believe.
  • (4/5)
    In liked this book for several reasons. First, I really enjoyed the conversation that was created from the start of the book. The conversations between each of the characters in this book flowed very well. The story begins with a grandmother and granddaughter exchanging words and the grandmother tells a story about her childhood. The author did an excellent job of presenting the story that the grandmother was to tell. Next, I thought that this book helped to push readers to think about tough issues including the concepts of segregation. The segregation that existed amongst white people and African Americans is a history lesson in itself. The issue of segregation is one that is still present within our society and I believe that the story allows readers to think about this issue. The author did a great job of writing the story as it was very believable and could have been based off of a true story. The author included factual information from history to do this. Also, I found that the story was not very said it had a little bit of humor in it because the girl thought that the sign that read “No Blacks!” meant that she needed to take her shoes off and drink from the fountain in her white socks. The final reason I enjoyed reading this book is because the illustrations that were created to fit the story were very light and almost peaceful. The main idea of this story was to tell a realistic story about segregation between African Americans and white people and the significance of standing up for ones self.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed listening to this story! I thought that this book taught a great history lesson. The book was able to explain to us about the past and how segregation worked. Coleman expressed the truth, for example when the blacks were whipped with a belt because they drank from the "white only" water fountain" which would be helpful for children to understand how segregation worked in history. Also, they taught an overall message injustice of prejudice. The story talks about the type of racism that went on just half a century ago. The story was believable and I could see that a grandmother would share this story with a grandchild. As the story takes place in Mississippi, it is set in a place where there was racial tension. Finally, the author allows the characters to speak in a very southern accent.
  • (4/5)
    I like this book for several reasons. One reason I like this book is the language. The author uses home language instead of standard English which brings more meaning to the story. "I sneaked up on that rode..." and "I done it" are just two examples of home language that brings the reader into a different time and culture. Another reason I like this book is the plot. The story begins with a child asking their grandmother to go into town and the grandmother responded by telling a story. This is something children can relate to because many grandmothers tell young children stories no matter what the child asked. The way the story is written is another reason I like this story. The story flows well and keeps the reader engaged by having something new happen with every page. The grandmother starts by walking into town, then runs into a chicken man, then watches an egg heat up on the sidewalk, then gets yelled at by a man for drinking from "whites only" water fountain. This series of events keeps the reader wanting to know what will happen next. This book also pushes the reader to think about a tough issue of the past. This book brings up the issue of segregation between whites and blacks in a way that children can understand what it might have been like and how the blacks had to stand up to the whites.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed reading this book for several reasons. First and foremost, the language in the book was phenomenal. The author wrote the book using the slang that is common in African American culture, allowing the reader to connect with the story on a different level. This language made the text more cultured. An example would be when the grandmother said, “kept right on yelling.” Though it is not proper English, it enhanced the writing. The language was also very descriptive. The author did not just use descriptive adjectives, but metaphors, which gave the reader a better understanding of exactly what was occurring. My favorite example of this in the text was when the grandmother said, “I watched that egg like the old men watched checkers before making a move.” This allows the reader to visualize what is happening without even needing to look at the illustrations. I also enjoyed the fact that the book pushed readers to consider issues that may be unfamiliar or hard to face. Racism and segregation can be hard for students to relate to in this day in age, especially if they are Caucasian. This book addressed it, but in a light hearted way. The little girl innocently though that “White’s only” meant she needed to wear white socks. The white man did not appreciate this, which is where the racism came into play. The story also spread a good message to children when all of the African American people stood together. It teaches children to stand up for what is right. I was thoroughly impressed with this story!
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book for multiple reasons. First, the language used throughout the book was engaging and authentic. The grandmother who was telling the story was very relaxed in her conversational speech and it made me feel, as a reader, that she was talking to me. With her genuine attitude showing through her sentences while she is telling her story, such as when she said: "Lord, you should a'seen me strutting, the dust flying behind me!" The language used was fitting for the story being told. I also really enjoyed the illustrations and choice of font. The story is set in the time of segregation, so the illustrations and text creates an image of a story being told a while ago. This story focuses on the strong message that everyone should be treated equally despite differences. The book pushes readers to think about tough issues, such as racial discrimination, and broadens readers perspectives outside of their comfort zones. This is a great text to use in a history lesson because although it is a serious text, it has elements that lighten the mood, such as the chicken man.
  • (4/5)
     I liked this story for a few reasons. I liked how the author used metaphors and similes like "his face got red as fire." This helps the reader clearly picture what is happening. I also liked the illustrations. The illustrations are colorful, detailed, and keep the reader engaged.I also like how the grandmother is telling this story to her granddaughter. This shows the importance of stories from older generations and shows how different/similar life is in the present. I like how the story teaches the reader about equality and also includes personal experiences. The big idea of the story is to treat everyone equally even if they are different from you.
  • (4/5)
    This story was a historical fiction story about a young African American girl in Mississippi. I liked how the story began in the present then switched to the past with a story told by a little girl’s grandmother. For example, the story begins with a little girl asking if she can go into town and the grandmother takes the opportunity to talk about her own like experience going into town in the past. The moment between the grandmother and girl seem important until the author takes you into another story that changed the lives of the two.I also enjoyed the watercolor/oil pastel art that is used in the story. The art influences the mood of the story and sets the time frame nicely. For example, the time zone in the story is in the late 1800s in Mississippi. The illustrations resemble a dusty, humid area relatable to the setting the story takes place.The big idea of this story is to stand up for yourself to benefit the lives of others. The grandmother tells the story of how she took it upon herself to break the water fountain rule of “whites only” to encourage others to stand up for themselves and their freedom.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: A little gill asks her Grandmother if she can go to town by herself. The grandma tells her granddaughter that she is old enough to go to town when she can do some good while being there and then tells her granddaughter about the first time she went to town on her own. As a child Grandma out on her best dress, took two eggs from her kitchen and when to town to see if you could really fry an egg on the sidewalk when it got really hot. While she was in town, she got thirsty. She saw a water fountain that according to her had a sign that said "white socks only" so she took off her shoes and stepped up in her white socks to drink from the fountain. However a white person saw this and got really angry. Other people started taking off their shoes and using the water fountain. Even when she was beaten the little girl did not cry or complain. Finally she was rescued by one of her neighbours and when he delivered her to her mother her mom told her that she was old enough to go to town by herself because she had proven she could do some good while she was there.Review:I gave this book 5 stars because I really like some of the features in it. One of the things i really loved about it was that the writing is not in standard english. It has a flare of African Vernacular English to it. That is important because there are not many books where children who do not speak standard english when they arrive at school, can see their own home language reflected in. Something else I really enjoyed about it was the mixture of events that took place. The book starts out with something very childish, a little girls mischievous quest to see if she could really fry an egg on a sidewalk. Then things get really serious after she drinks from the fountain. The author handles this masterfully. exposing the seriousness of the situation and transmitting to the reader the feel and meaning of what is happening with out out the utilization of graphic pictures or vulgar language and she does this is a way that can really help children understand a very cruel part of United States history from a child's perspective.
  • (4/5)
    Review: This book had an amazing meaning to it and can be very useful in the classroom. The illustrations in the book are amazingly drawn. Summary: The story begins with a little African American girl who asked her grandmother if she could go into town by herself. Her grandmother sat her down and began to tell her a story. When her grandmother was young she stuck out of her house and went to town bringing two eggs with her. When she got there she went up to a statue of a horse and cracked an egg on the horses leg. She watched as the egg slid down its leg and onto the cement. The egg began to cook right in front of her eyes and she couldn't believe it. She was so excited to see this happen. She began to walk home but was so thirsty. She saw a water fountain that read "whites only." She thought she knew what that meant so she took off her leather shoes and only had her white socks on. As she was drinking a big white man came and picked her up and threw her to the ground. He started yelling at her for drinking from the whites only water fountain. She began to cry but out of no where an old black woman from her church took off her shoes and started to drink from the fountain. All of a sudden African Americans came and started taking off their shoes and drinking from the fountain although none of them had on white socks. The white people all began to yell and the white man took off his belt and started whipping all of the black people. A man who was known as the "chicken man" parted the crowd. He was known for healing helped up the little girl and whipped off her face and told her to go home. All of the black people surrounded the girl and brought her home.Argument: I enjoyed reading this book. I was a little confused at first why the chicken man was relevant to the story, but at the end the author brought him back in. This book teaches an amazing lesson and is very well written. The overall message in this book teaches children about racism, and treating others with respect and kindness. No matter who they are, what they look like, the color of their skin, or what clothes they wear.
  • (5/5)
    This is a story about a young African American girl and her true courage in the fight against segregation. A little girl snuck out to town to see if it is true what they say about frying an egg on the sidewalk on a hot summer day. After being able to fry the egg, she is thirsty and comes to a water fountain with a sing reading, "Whites Only". She simply takes off her shoes, striping down to her clean white socks, and steps up to the fountain. As soon as she takes a sip of water, a white man throws her to the ground yelling, "Can't you read, girl?" and taking out his belt to whip her. Suddenly, she looks over to see multiple African American adults taking off their socks and stepping up to drink from the "Whites Only" fountain, and even the magical "Chicken Man", said to turn people into chickens, helped the cause. From that day on, the "White's Only" on the fountain was gone.
  • (5/5)
    White Socks Only is story about a grandma retelling her story to her granddaughter of a time she sneaked into town to do “no good.” She was dressed up from head to toe with her fresh, white socks on. She intended to crack a few eggs on the horse statue outside of the court house because of a rumor she had heard. She ends up drinking water from a fountain that says “whites only.” She takes her shoes off and steps up to the fountain in her white socks. A mean townsman catches her drinking and begins to whip her. Then, unexpectedly, other African American locals step up and start drinking from the same fountain. The future of this Mississippi town would be forever change. The theme was very inspiring and this story would be a great discussion piece about history, equality, respect, and responsibility for ones actions. I think it is so important to incorporate a cultural variety of text in a classroom in order to reach all readers interests. This text does a great job of informing readers about past cultural differences as well as shedding light on kindness, and hope.I really enjoyed this text for two reason, the writing and the illustrations. The writing in this book was engaging, and the conversations were clear and easy to decipher. The flow of the words allowed for easy transition from page to page. Since this story is being retold to a young girl, the word choice throughout the story is perfect for elementary students. As she was approaching the water fountain, “saw a ‘white’s only’ sign, she took off her shoes so she was just in her white socks.” This allows for readers to easily picture this occurring even without the illustrations. The illustrations in this book definitely enhances the story. Many children may not have background knowledge about Mississippi. This story paints the beautiful oak trees, long country dirt roads, and the dry, small town in Cole County in a way where readers could just look at the pictures and have a good idea of what is happening in the story. The colors used within the illustrations are soft, yet vivid which I believe is appropriate for the mood of the story. For example, this theme could be considered controversial, but Evelyn Coleman uses calming colors and soft stokes to keep the tone more comfortable throughout the text.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book because of the point of view, and the plot. I enjoyed that the book was based on a first person point of view. I love how the grandmother reflected on her experiences. The author did a great job when depicting the feelings of African Americans at this time in history. When the grandmother says, "I began to cry as a crowd of white people gathered around," this portrays her feelings successfully. I also enjoyed the plot because it was organized and displayed great conflict based on segregation. Eventually, the author writes that the conflict was solved and the blacks overcame the segregation of "whites only." I love how the author began with a problem, and made her way to the solution. When the young girl stood her ground, and other African Americans stood up for her, this portrayed the importance of sticking up for oneself. The big idea of the story was that judging people by the color of their skin is foolish, and it is important to treat people with respect and kindness.
  • (4/5)
    This historical fiction children's book is the perfect way to introduce racism and the struggle this country went through in the past. Evelyn Coleman writes a story of a grandmother telling her granddaughter about the time she first snuck into town. It has scary characters, like the Chicken Man, and deals with a young African American girl drinking out of a "Whites Only" water fountain. It shows the innocence of a child's understanding of what "Whites Only" meant and uses incredible metaphors to convey what equality should look like. Evelyn Coleman creates a strong character who stands up for what is right in the body of a small and terrified little girl who had no idea of the impact she had on her town when she stepped up to that "Whites Only" water fountain. If I had to introduce this topic to 2-4 graders, White Socks Only would be the perfect start.