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Longueur:
576 pages
2 heures
Sortie:
May 15, 2018
ISBN:
9781616897437
Format:
Livre

Description

This comprehensive reference guide explores bookbinding techniques in start-to-finish detail, explaining all possible options in clear illustrations and easy-to-follow text, making it easy for artists and designers to compare and choose among them.
From types of paper to folding methods, to all of the available paperback and hardcover bindings, to finishing techniques and case studies by contemporary designers, Bookbinding is truly the must-have book for professional designers and production staff. Bookbinding is also a work of art in its own right, given an award by the Type Director's Club for typographic excellence.
Sortie:
May 15, 2018
ISBN:
9781616897437
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Franziska Morlok studied graphic design at the Academy of Fine Arts in Saarbrücken and the University of the Arts in Berlin. She as published several books, and teaches Visual Communication at the University of the Arts in Berlin.

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Aperçu du livre

Bookbinding - Franziska Morlok

This book . . .

. . . explores the possibilities of folding, stitching and binding from the perspective of (and incorporating questions from) designers and production managers, facilitating collaboration with binderies and an understanding of the process as a whole.

. . . offers lots of important

Tips from bookbinders

Pointers about pitfalls

. . . explains

types of fold from p. 96

and various binding techniques using . . .

wire from p. 121

glue from p. 141

thread from p. 171

binding systems and fasteners from p. 210

. . . illustrates the difference between

softcovers from p. 256

hardcovers from p. 332

. . . and explores other important topics, including

Planning a publication from p. 20

The production process from p. 60

Format from p. 24 and paper from p. 30

Design specifications from p. 358

Contents

Turning a print project into reality is not simply about the binding style but also about choosing a type of cover, as well as making many other decisions. The various chapters of this book are therefore concerned with all aspects of the printed product – from the binding style to the paper to the cover and other design elements.

Basics

Folding and binding techniques

Constructing a softcover book

Constructing a hardcover book

Overview of different covers

Different kinds of fore-edge

How to develop a print project

The concept: Developing and realizing a publication

Format

Paper

Printed sheets

The printing process and binding styles

Industrial and hand bookbinding

How does the production process work?

Books on demand

Estimates

What happens in a bindery

The book as an objet d’art

Bookbinding, reinterpreted: Twelve interesting examples by contemporary designers

Overview:

Binding techniques

Folding

Parallel folds

Cross folds

Combination folds

Wire

Saddle stitching

Side stitching

Glue

Perfect binding

Fold gluing

Lay-flat binding

Thread

Thread sewing

Pamphlet sewing

Side sewing

Thread sealing

Binding systems

Spiral and comb binding

Binding rings

Screws, rivets, eyelets

Spine bars and springback binders

Rubber-band binding

The soft cover:

Softcover books

Single-sheet softcover with 360-degree rotation

Side-bound softcover

Softcover bound along the spine fold

Softcovers: Common styles

Standard softcover

Softcover with flaps

Blank softcover with jacket and flaps

Blank softcover with drawn-on jacket and flaps

Tape-bound softcover

Swiss binding

Kösel EB 500

Softcover with a detached spine

Flush board binding with spine backing

The hard cover:

Hardcover books

Single-piece cases

Cases made of synthetic material

Multi-piece case bindings

3- and 4-piece cases: Full binding

5- and 6-piece cases: Half binding

Padded cases

Additional information:

Design specifications

Interior paper

Endpapers

Case materials

Covering materials

Soft covers

Dust jackets

Bellybands

Head and tail bands

Folding plates, fold-outs, centre folds, fold-ins

Finishing techniques

Ribbons (bookmarks)

Rounded spines

Rounded corners

Appendices

Glossary

More than 285 technical terms from the book, with brief explanations

Afterword

Acknowledgements

Sources and credits

Folding and binding techniques

Folding

Parallel folds 101

Cross folds 109

Combination folds 113

Stitching with wire

Saddle stitching 121

Side stitching 131

Binding with glue

Perfect binding 141

Padding 146

Fold gluing 155

Lay-flat binding 161

Sewing with thread

Thread sewing 171

Pamphlet sewing 181

Side sewing 191

Thread sealing 201

Binding systems and fasteners

Wire combs, spirals, plastic combs 213

Rings 225

Screws, rivets, eyelets 233

Spine bars 241

Rubber-band binding 247

Constructing a softcover book

Book block

Scoring

Binding (perfect binding)

Cover

Constructing a hardcover book

Endpapers

Book block

Super

Backlining paper

Head and tail bands

Paste-down

Covering materials

Binding (thread sewing)

Spine/spine piece

Case

Overview of different covers

Thread sewing 171

Full binding 346

Flat spine 332

Thread sewing 171

Full binding 346

Rounded spine 386

Thread sewing 171

Half binding 350

Flat spine 332

Thread sewing 171

Half binding 350

Rounded spine 386

Thread sewing 171

Four-piece case 346

Flat spine 332

Thread sewing 171

Padded case 354

Ribbon 386

Thread sewing 171

Single-piece case 336

Rounded spine 386

Plastic cover 342

Thread sewing 171

Open spine 178

Thread sewing 171

Flush board binding with spine backing 322

Thread sewing 178

Open spine 178

Flush board binding with spine backing 322

Thread sewing 171

Swiss binding with a hard cover 332

Lay-flat binding 161

Lay-flat binding incorporating board 161

(as used for children’s board books)

Perfect binding 141

Standard softcover 284

Perfect binding 141

Softcover with a detached spine 312

Perfect binding 141

Swiss binding 304

Perfect binding 141

with fold-outs 376

Padding 146

Ring-wire binding 215

Single-sheet softcover 260

Plastic comb binding 220

Single-sheet softcover 260

Japanese stab binding 195

Side-bound softcover 268

Book screws 210

Side-bound softcover 268

Spine bars 241

Pamphlet sewing 181

Saddle stitching 121

Softcover bound along the spine fold 274

Different kinds of fore-edge

Saddle-stitched untrimmed 125

Saddle-stitched trimmed 125

Wire-o 215

Standard softcover 284

Wraparound cover 266

Softcover with flaps 288

Fold-outs 376

Japanese stab binding 195

Flush board binding with spine backing 322

Hardcover 332

Flat fore-edge 386

Hardcover 332

Rounded fore-edge 386

Single-piece case 336

Rounded fore-edge 386

Padded case 354

Hardcover 332

Foiled edges 377

Printed edges 377

Rounded corners 386

Coloured edges 377

Rounded fore-edge 386

The concept: Developing and realizing a publication

There are various aspects to take into account when developing a publication. The question of which folding, case or cover style is most suitable should be considered right from the start, because the interior and exterior design and the content should be closely coordinated.

Books, flyers and folders are not merely repositories of information, their form serving only to store and protect their contents. They are also three-dimensional aesthetic objects that must fulfil certain criteria in terms of their design as well as their physical look and feel. A successful publication is always the result of the interplay between interior and exterior design.

In addition to the layout – comprising typography, illustrations and colours – the format, materials, folds and binding style all play an important role.

A publication can be much more than a linear sequence of pages – in a perfect world, it can be a comprehensive work of art that appeals to the senses on various levels and interacts creatively with its content. In our digital age, such publications are increasingly becoming highly sought-after objects and collector’s items. The goal should always be to ensure not only that the form clearly communicates the content, but that both are intertwined.

In reality, of course, cost or functional requirements are often prioritized so highly that binding techniques and design are barely discussed at all, leaving design potential untapped. Yet even if the format, shape, extent and weight are predetermined, there are all sorts of ways to make a publication stand out.

That is why it is so important to get bookbinders involved in the early development stages. Not all ideas can be implemented, of course, but experts familiar with the processes, methods and technical possibilities of printing and bookbinding will easily find alternative solutions. By drawing on a strong base of knowledge and experience, it is possible to develop realistic projects that go beyond traditional or standard models – often producing results the designer never considered, or even inspiring the bookbinder to explore new avenues.

At the start of the initial planning phase it is a good idea to ask a few questions, the answers to which could have a significant impact on subsequent decisions and design processes.

What content is being communicated?

Is this a photography book, a magazine, a novel, an art catalogue, an information sheet or a fold-out poster? Are you trying to tell a linear story? Or are you arranging things differently, deliberately interrupting and reshaping the narrative structures of the content?

Who is the target audience?

Are you targeting academics or children? Thousands of readers or just a small group? Age range, reading habits and socialization all play an important role.

What is the intended purpose of the publication?

Is it informational material for a festival that is only going to last three days, or a textbook that will be used frequently and intensively? Depending on the intended purpose of the publication, you will have to think carefully about its format, weight and how easy it is to open and lay flat. Books in frequent use, for instance, will need a sturdy binding. Texts with a high page count should use paper that is not too white or too transparent. A big, heavy book may seem impractical – or it may command respect.

How will the publication be read?

A newspaper is read selectively, but a novel end to end. The various ways of reading a publication will affect its shape and, to a degree, its format.

What impression is the publication supposed to make?

Should the book seem especially high-end? Does it represent a particular brand? Or is it a fanzine, intended to project a certain lightness of touch? The style of design, the format, the colours, the materials – each of these elements has a particular effect you should be aware of. The texture of the paper, the smell of the printing ink, the heaviness of a book, the lightness of a small folded poster that unfurls into a large-scale image. Raw linen that evokes the feel of a strong, warm blanket, or the fascinating artificial suppleness of a synthetic cover paper that feels like skin – such textures may be appealing or they may be repulsive, but either way they provoke a reaction. There is a huge diversity of materials that can be used to communicate ideas, although not all are suited to every purpose.

What is your budget?

Are there specific constraints imposed by production costs? Can you fall back on alternative, more cost-effective materials in your design? Could there be high shipping costs you need to take into consideration when thinking about manufacturing?

Why does shipping sometimes influence the development of a publication?

Anybody creating a printed product that needs to be shipped individually has to consider the restrictions imposed by format and consignment costs. With small production runs these are less important, but with large runs, shipping costs can use up half the budget. That is why it makes sense to integrate packing directly into the production process. A yearbook, for instance, which will be sent to all students, can be packed for postage at the bindery. The format and the weight of the paper stock should be chosen so as not to exceed shipping-cost constraints.

Format

If you don’t want to fall back on traditional formats, of which there are many, then you can, of course, choose your own. Which format is best suited to which project depends on several things, including reader behaviour, type area and costs.

In order to find the right format for a publication, the following issues are crucial:

Content

Target audience, intended use

Design, type area, extent

Technical criteria (dimensions of the printed sheet, printing press size, materials)

Cost (especially in choosing materials and design specifications)

First, you should think about the content of your publication. What are you trying to convey? Is it text-led, or are there a lot of illustrations? Is a large format essential, because the images have to be reproduced in full detail? Or does the format of the images (as with artworks, for instance) determine the format of the book, because they have to be printed full-page but can’t be cropped? Maybe a simple paperback

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