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Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans

Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans

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Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans

évaluations:
4/5 (9 évaluations)
Longueur:
101 pages
Sortie:
Aug 4, 2015
ISBN:
9780544673052
Format:
Livre

Description

Sibert Honor Medalist ∙ Kirkus’ Best of 2015 list ∙ School Library Journal Best of 2015 ∙ Publishers Weekly’s Best of 2015 list ∙ Horn Book Fanfare Book ∙ Booklist Editor's Choice

On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina's monstrous winds and surging water overwhelmed the protective levees around low-lying New Orleans, Louisiana. Eighty percent of the city flooded, in some places under twenty feet of water. Property damages across the Gulf Coast topped $100 billion. One thousand eight hundred and thirty-three people lost their lives. The riveting tale of this historic storm and the drowning of an American city is one of selflessness, heroism, and courage—and also of incompetence, racism, and criminality.
        Don Brown’s kinetic art and as-it-happens narrative capture both the tragedy and triumph of one of the worst natural disasters in American history. A portion of the proceeds from this book has been donated to Habitat for Humanity New Orleans.

Sortie:
Aug 4, 2015
ISBN:
9780544673052
Format:
Livre

À propos de l'auteur

Don Brown is the author of Thunder in the Morning Calm, The Malacca Conspiracy, The Navy Justice Series, and The Black Sea Affair, a submarine thriller that predicted the 2008 shooting war between Russia and Georgia. Don served five years in the U.S. Navy as an officer in the Judge Advocate General's (JAG) Corps, which gave him an exceptional vantage point into both the Navy and the inner workings "inside-the-beltway" as an action officer assigned to the Pentagon. He left active duty in 1992 to pursue private practice, but remained on inactive status through 1999, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Commander. He and his family live in North Carolina, where he pursues his passion for penning novels about the Navy. www.donbrownbooks.com Facebook: Don-Brown  

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Drowned City - Don Brown

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Ce que les gens pensent de Drowned City

4.2
9 évaluations / 9 Avis
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Avis des lecteurs

  • (4/5)
    A quick read, this graphic novel does an amazing job outlining the complexities and horror of Hurricane Katrina. Don Brown did an astounding job writing and illustrating the events leading up to the disaster, the struggle for life and safety during the hurricane and flooding, and the chaotic aftermath. Not one to shy away from making it a clear cut disaster, Brown illustrates the screw ups, the loss of life, and the government miscommunication that helped ensure the death of more people than necessary. A great introduction for teens wanting to know more about what happened.
  • (5/5)
    The story of the events that took place before, during and after Hurricane Katrina struck. Along with dialogue that people had said about the events.
  • (4/5)
    A telling of the events in New Orleans and surrounding area when Hurricane Katrina hit. Nonfiction book that isa helpful history. I learned a lot from reading, after just visiting New Orleans, it helped me to better understand the events and the trauma of what happened in the aftermath of the storm.
  • (4/5)
    Graphic depiction of the destruction in New Orleans caused by Hurricane Katrina and its effects on local residents.
  • (4/5)
    This is a gripping and sobering read, well-researched and well-drawn. For those of us who remember watching this disaster unfold on the evening news, it's hard to believe it was ten years ago (and no doubt, for the residents of New Orleans and the gulf shore, it's even more omnipresent). However, this book does an excellent job of making the tragedy real and immediate to young readers who don't have any clear memories of those events.
  • (5/5)
    I have a lot of friends who came from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina hit and I never took the time to understand what exactly happened when Katrina hit. This is a powerful story that is sad but honest. This can be helpful in science when talking about the weather.
  • (5/5)
    This book was amazing! I liked the true reality that it portrayed throughout the book. It showed the importance of communication and help when natural disasters happen. Don Brown's illustrations were personal and insightful as he showed pictures of what really happened during Hurricane Katrina.
  • (3/5)
    The author/illustrator relates the history of Hurricane Katrina for young readers, relying on sources that include books, broadcast interviews, and newspaper articles. The focus is on laying out the facts of what happened, which reveal the problems of how people and governments were not prepared or able to cope with the aftermath. The illustrations are stark and dramatic, giving viewers a sense of what it must have been like. Nothing is too graphic; corpses are depicted face down. He didn't touch on how much the poor were impacted nor does he really indict the inept government responses, two things that resonated with me at the time of the hurricane. But that was apparently not the intent of his work and probably a book for another time.
  • (4/5)
    Most middle grade readers were only toddlers when Hurricane Katrina came ripping through the Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama coasts on August 29, 2005. Don Brown's non-fiction graphic novel superbly illustrates the plight of the people left stranded in New Orleans, with no way to escape and with water rapidly rising by the foot. The peoples' desperation is evident as they struggle to survive in a crowded Superdome and then subsequently migrate into Texas. Brown's illustrations are with a light hand yet show the depth of horror and emotion--but also hope--that came from the disaster.