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Use online resources safely


TAFE SA Code: Nominal Hours: Unit Descriptor:
The focus of this unit enables the learner to locate and use information online while maintaining a safe environment.

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Application of Unit:
This unit applies to learners wanting to develop online technology skills for self, employment, education and/or community participation. It contributes to the achievement of ACSF indicators of competence for learning, communication and reading at level 2. See Australian Core Skills framework levels of Performance for more detail. http://deewr.gov.au/SKILLS/PROGRAMS/LITANDNUM/ACSF/Pages/default.aspx To enhance the outcomes for learners it is recommended that this unit be taught concurrently with other units at this level, and that assessments include both integrated and stand alone tasks. To achieve competency in this unit, young people need to be able to operate hardware at a basic level, research and analyse online and be safe and secure in the use of online services.

They need to demonstrate:


Ability to operate hardware Use interface/icons Understand and Navigate file structures Use online services with support Knowledge of how to use internet safely Vet emails for scams, spam, phishing

Critical aspects for assessment and evidence required to demonstrate competency in this unit:
This unit of work involves accessing information via computer and internet and completing interactive activities. It contains a range of opportunities to assist the young person to meet the performance criteria (see checklist). Competence is demonstrated through holistic and simulated/real life tasks rather than a specific individual assessment for each concept. Authentic learning opportunities may include: Researching a topic Identifying relevant and reliable information

Context of and specific resources for assessment:


A range of assessment strategies are required to demonstrate competency of this unit including Observation Work samples Questioning Presentation in group discussions Peer/self assessment

Consistency of performance:
To ensure consistency of performance over the range statements and contexts, this unit must be assessed over a period of time.

Use On-line Resources Safely


Certificate 1 Education and Skills Development
Compulsory Unit Name: __________________________ TAFE ID Number: ___________________ Performance Criteria Operate hardware at a basic level 1.1 Turn the device on and off 1.2 Navigate the screen interface/icons 1.3 Understand and navigate file structures 1.4 Use basic online services with support Research and analyse online information with support 2.1 Identify and use search engines 2.2 Search and find relevant information/content 2.3 Establish the relevance and reliability of information located Be safe and secure in the use of online services 3.1 Provide an appropriate level of personal information 3.2 Assess the legitimacy of online requests to make an informed decision 3.3 Assess emails for scams, spam or phishing to make an informed decision 3.4 Manage personal occupational health and safety Date Assessed WPA Initial

Result: achieved / not yet achieved Date Completed:___________________ Student Signature:____________________ Assessor Name:_______________________ Signature:_______________________

Basic Hardware Operations

(Photo by Deegephotos photostream, available under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

Getting Started
In order to get us started we will need to complete a short induction around your computer. Together with a facilitator you will demonstrate that you are able to complete a series of basic tasks:
Starting up and shutting down your computer correctly Basic navigation around your operating system (i.e. windows

XP, windows vista, windows 7, android, apple osx etc) Navigating to and opening software on your computer (i.e. opening a Word or power-point document, opening a media player, accessing the i-Tunes store) Navigating to and opening Files contained on your computer (saving documents in a particular space and re-opening them at a later date) Correctly inserting and removing external devices to create back up or portable copies of files (i.e. using a USB storage device, iPod, phone etc As you demonstrate these skills your facilitator will be able to mark them off on the checklist provided on the next page.

Use Online Resources Safely Certificate 1 Education and Skills Development


Name:_______________________ 1. Observation Checklist _____________________ has demonstrated competency in the following skills: Date Turn on the computer and boot the system ready for use Shut the system down correctly Enter appropriate drive View the directory Create a file Copy files Delete files Save files Make back- up files (eg to USB or external hard drive) Access the chosen program Use menus Save and name files * WPA = Work Place Assessor 2. Workstation setup Record some key strategies to ensure good Occupational Health and Safety when using computers.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Date_____________________

* WPA Initials

______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________

Workstation Setup
Together with your facilitator read and discuss the information below and then work through the workstation checklist provided in the appendix section at the back of this unit (Appendix A). Ergonomics
Ergonomics refers to how the workplace is set up in relation to the

equipment you use, the design of the building and how you perform your work.
When you are sitting at your workstation, you should be able to

place your feet firmly on the ground or on a footrest, your thighs should be parallel with the floor, and the backrest of your chair should support your lower back. You should be able to move your chair easily about the work area and its base should have five points touching the floor.
Your workplace should be set up so that you dont have to twist,

reach or bend too often. If you do have to reach for something it is better to get up out of the chair and take the opportunity to change your posture. This will also help to reduce fatigue.
When sitting at a computer, the screen should set up so that you

can read the screen with very little movement of your head, neck and shoulders. You should take rest breaks for your eyes every 20 minutes. The simplest way to do this is to look away from the screen at something in the distance. Do this for three to five minutes every 20 minutes.

(Photo by Kare Products photostream, available under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

Interactive Activities
After you have completed the 'Workstation Checklist' please record some of the ways that you have discovered that model good occupational health and safety when using computers. Use the space provided on the bottom of the check list from the first activity 'getting started' to record your learning.

Next up, try the SafeWork SA website for an interactive game about safe work spaces. You can access the website by either typing in or clicking on the link below. http://tiny.cc/SafeWork_SA

Working with Online Resources

(Image by CSUC, available under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

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What is a Search Engine?


A search engine can be described as a program that searches documents for specified keywords and returns a list of the documents where the keywords were found.

Although 'search engine' is really a general class of programs, the term is often used to specifically describe systems like Google, Yahoo and Bing that allow people to search for documents on the World Wide Web (or internet).

Have a quick look at the images on the next page and see how many of the images you recognise. After that talk about which 'search engines' you may already use and what you most commonly search for.

(Photo by Toby Fogarty, available under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

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Using Search Engines


Now that we have talked about the variety of search engines that are out there for you to access, we need to make sure we can use them. Think about your favourite Musician, Band or Celebrity (TV, Movie, Sports, Extreme Sports etc). We are going to complete a small research task about your chosen subject, using the Template that can be found following this page.

Facilitators Note: Please find a 1 page checklist that can be used for Evaluating Internet Sources in the appendix section of this unit (Appendix B).

Step 1
Using one of the search engines from page 1, complete an internet search on your chosen Musician, Band or Celebrity.

Step 2
Save a copy of your internet search by using the 'Print Screen' button on your computer and then opening a word document and pasting your captured image into the document. Save the document with the title 'Using search engine'.

Step 3
Using the results of the search engine select the website or websites that you will use to complete the research task template.

Step 4
When you have finished the research task template, save the document with your own name added to the document name.

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Research Task Template


Name or Names of your chosen Musician, Band or Celebrity: ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________

Paste a picture of your chosen Musician, Band or Celebrity here:

Share 3 interesting facts about your chosen Musician, Band or Celebrity (make sure they can be confirmed as true and correct & also include the address of the website that you sourced the information from): Fact No Fact 1 Fact 2 Fact 3 Fact Website Address

As you looked at each website, describe how you decided if the information that the website was sharing was true or not? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________

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Staying Safe Online

(Photo by John Drogers photostream, available under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

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How safe are you ?


The internet has become an important part of everyday life and while it allows you to connect, create and communicate 24/7, it is important to consider your own safety when you are online.

Start of by taking the online quiz that you can access by either typing in or clicking on the link below. (The quiz is hosted on the Cybersmart website).

http://tiny.cc/cyber_smart_quiz

And then watch the following short videos / animations and work through the information pages for each clip.
Facilitators Note: Please note that where URL (website addresses) within this document appear to have a space between words there is an underscore (_) this will be required if you are typing in the web address.

Think before you post


http://tiny.cc/thinkb4youpost

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Digital Reputation - What is my digital


reputation?
Your digital reputation is defined by your behaviour in the online environment and by the content that you post about yourself and others. Tagged photos, blog posts and social networking interactions will all shape how you are perceived by others online and offline. A poor digital reputation can affect your friendships and relationships as well as your future job prospects. What happens online can permanently affect you in the real worldso protect your digital reputation.

(Photo by luc legay photostream, available (and modified) under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

How do I protect my digital reputation?

Think before you post!


Set your profile to private and check every now and then to make sure the settings havent changed. Keep an eye on photos tagged by your friends. Remember, online information could be there forever. Your personal information may end up being seen by people you dont know, including potential employers.

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Megans Story
http://tiny.cc/megans_story

Sexting - What is it?


Sexting is the sending of provocative or sexual photos, images, messages or videos using a mobile phone or posting online. Once youve sent a picture or message, its out of your control. Images posted online can be almost impossible to remove and they may come back to haunt you anywhere and anytime well into the future. Theres no such thing as safe sexting, even if you think you can trust your current boyfriend or girlfriend.

(Photo by Clicony photostream, available under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

Could I be breaking the law?


Sexting may seem funny or flirty but there can be serious social and legal consequences, particularly if youre under 18 years old. Sexting images may be considered child pornography. Even if all participants are willing, they may be breaking the law if they take and share naked or sexual images of themselves or others who are minors.

How do I deal with it?


Think before you postit could be online forever! Adjust your privacy settingssome things were never meant to be shared. Manage photos or images tagged with your name - detag a.s.a.p. Delete any sexting you receive and dont forward anything on. Consider others before you photograph or post. Talk to an adult you trust.

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Facebook in Reality
http://tiny.cc/facebookreality

Unwanted Contact - What is it?


Unwanted contact is any type of online communication that you find unpleasant or confronting. The contact can come from online friends you havent met in person or someone you know in the offline world. Unwanted contact can include:
being asked inappropriate or personal questions by someone

you dont know being sent offensive, confronting or obscene content being asked to send intimate pictures or do things online that make you feel uncomfortable

How do I deal with it?


Tell someone you trust, like your mum, dad or another adult. Dont respond and leave the site or chat session. Block the contact or remove them from your friends list. Change your profile settings so that your personal details are kept private. Dont open messages from people you dont know. Keep the evidence. This can be useful in tracking the person posting unsuitable material. Contact your ISP and/ or phone provider, or the website administrator. There are actions they can take to help.

(Photo by Ben Terrett photostream, available under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

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Talent Show
http://tiny.cc/talent_show

Cyberbullying - What is it?


Cyberbullying is using technology to deliberately and repeatedly bully someone else. It can happen to anyone, anytime, and can leave you feeling unsafe and alone. Cyberbullying can include: abusive texts and emails posting unkind messages or images imitating others online excluding others online inappropriate image tagging Remember treat others as you would like to be treated when communicating online.

(Photo by bullyinguk photostream, available under a CreativeCommons Attribution-Noncommercial license.)

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How is it different to face-to-face bullying?


While cyberbullying is similar to face-to-face bullying it also differs in the following ways: it can give the person doing the bullying a sense of being anonymous it can occur 24/7 and be difficult to escape it is invasive and you can be targeted while at home it can have a large audience - sent to groups or posted on a public forum it can be permanent

How do I deal with it?


Dont retaliate or respond. Block the person doing the bullying and change your privacy

settings. Report it - Click the report abuse button. Collect the evidence - keep mobile phone messages and print Emails or social networking conversations. Talk to someone you trust, like a family member or friend.

Talking to your teachers or parents can make a difference. Your school may have policies in place to deal with bullying and cyberbullying.

What do you do if your friend is being bullied online?


While it can be hard to know if your friends are being cyberbullied, if you see or know about cyberbullying happening to a friend:
Dont forward messages or pictures. Though you may not have started it, you will become part of

the cyberbullying cycle. Stand up and speak out - tell a trusted adult.

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Nana gets an email


http://tiny.cc/nana_email

Identity Theft - What is identity theft?


Identity theft is when your personal information is used without your knowledge or permission. Personal information can be accessed from your computer or at a public computer terminal. With sufficient information, criminals can use your information to:

open bank accounts in your name apply for credit cards or loans in your name transfer money directly from your bank accounts impersonate you online on social networking sites

Identity theft can damage your chances of applying for loans and credit cards when you are older

How do I avoid it?


Monitor your content - if your profile has been hacked shut it down asap. Use secure websites for online shopping and banking. Dont post personal information small pieces of personal data can be used to build a much bigger picture. Change passwords password should be:
eight or more characters in length, preferably a mix of symbols,

letters and numbers changed regularly never shared

How do I deal with it?


Watch your bank account and respond immediately to any unexpected withdrawals or suspicious spending. Report it - talk to an adult that you trust, and to your bank Dont get phished - dont respond to calls or emails from banks asking for passwords or other details. If the email asks you to click on a link, chances are its a scam. If you receive a call from someone saying theyre from the bank, hang up and call back on their publicly listed number to see if its real.

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Follow up units of Work


There is a very large variety of resources that can be accessed on any or all of the previous topics that have been covered. There are three units of work in particular (listed below) that can be found within the appendix section of the unit. These can also be found on the 'Cybersmart' (www.cybersmart.gov.au) website.

Appropriate Communication (Appendix C) Ethical Responsibilities and practices (Appendix D)


Net basics E-security (http://tiny.cc/netbasicsdoc)

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Appendix A

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Appendix B

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Appendix C

Unit of work Lower secondary ages 1213


I am what I postappropriate use and communication

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Contents
I am what I postAppropriate use and communication.................................................. 33 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 33 Before you start ........................................................................................................... 33 Unit overview ................................................................................................................... 33 Aims ............................................................................................................................. 33 Objectives .................................................................................................................... 34 Length of time required for lessons ............................................................................. 34 Key concepts ............................................................................................................... 34 Curriculum and learning resources links ......................................................................... 34 National curriculum connections ................................................................................. 34 Cross curriculum links ................................................................................................. 35 Lesson resources ........................................................................................................ 35 Learning activities ............................................................................................................ 37 My internet use ............................................................................................................ 37 Online communication protocols ................................................................................. 38 Communicating with different audiences .................................................................... 42 My online image........................................................................................................... 43 Going further ................................................................................................................ 44 Worksheets ...................................................................................................................... 46 Worksheet 1: Fill in the meaning of the acronyms below............................................ 46 Teacher key ................................................................................................................. 47

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Creative Commons These teaching resources on the Cybersmart websites Schools Gateway are now available to schools under Creative Commons licences. The new licensing conditions are more flexible than existing copyright, enabling schools and teachers to use, adapt and re-publish material from the resource, without seeking permission to republish from the ACMA. These materials have been licensed under an attribution non-commercial share alike license (BY-NC-SA). Under these licenses, the materials are available for free use and adaptation so teachers can change, translate and share new creations with other teachers and students. Copyright Notice Source: Commonwealth of Australia 2009

This work is based on materials that constitute copyright of the Commonwealth of Australia and is licensed under a

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike 2.5 Australia Licence.


Disclaimer: The ACMA has taken reasonable care to ensure the information in this work is correct and accurate at the time of publication. However, the ACMA makes no warranties regarding the correctness of the information at later dates, and disclaims liability for damages resulting from its use. The ACMA recommends that users exercise their own independent skill and judgment when using this work and carefully evaluate the accuracy, currency, completeness and relevance of the material for their purposes. The ACMA requests that if you republish this work, you notify the ACMA by email at:

cybersafety@acma.gov.au including a link to the republished work. This is to assist us in


tracking the uptake of our works and the innovative uses that our licensees are making of our works. See: more information

http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/Legal/Copyright.aspx for

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Unit of workLower secondary Teaching


I am what I postAppropriate use and communication
Introduction
The internet offers a wealth of opportunities to be entertained, and is also a continually expanding learning resource. It offers an effective way to communicate, collaborate and engage with diverse audiences. Use of the internet and various internet-enabled devices has rapid uptake among people of all ages, but is particularly popular with young people. Young people need to be encouraged to maintain a balanced approach to ICT use and to follow communication conventions and protocols when communicating with others online. They also need guidance as they are developing their online image and identity. This unit covers the following topics: internet use online communication protocols communicating with different audiences online image.

Teachers should review all suggested websites, videos and other digital content before use in the class room to ensure that it meets school guidelines and student needs.

Before you start


Have you checked the behaviours and skills levels of your students? If not, visit What are students doing online? in the Schools section on the ACMA Cybersmart website at www.cybersmart.gov.au/schools.aspx to assess their skills. This section also provides information on children and technology, including cybercitizen profiles, videos of students discussing their online activities and links to the ACMA research.

Unit overview
Aims
This unit aims to help students to: reflect on their internet, gaming and mobile activity to maintain a balanced approach to use increase their understanding of different online or digital modes and how to use them to communicate effectively appropriate to the audience consider online etiquette and rights and responsibilities that are integral to ethical internet use consider how they represent themselves via internet sites and services such as social networking

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reflect on their online image or digital footprint and understand the concept of persistence in relation to the web.

Objectives
By the end of this unit, students will be able to: identify how much time they spend on the internet, gaming devices and mobiles identify and describe, explain or practise using a range of online communication modes be able to draw upon knowledge of communication protocols in relation to personal internet use that relates to netiquette, online conventions and language. understand that it is difficult to remove or to retract content that is posted online and this may have an impact on reputation.

Length of time required for lessons


7 x 45 mins (approx).

Key concepts
To check how these concepts apply to your learning program explore Learning Pathways lower secondary under Teacher resources in the Schools section of the ACMA Cybersmart website www.cybersmart.gov.au/schools.aspx.

Curriculum and learning resources links


National curriculum connections

Values Education
National Values Education website with the Nine Values for Australian Schooling. www.valueseducation.edu.au/values/val_national_framework_for_values_educati on,8757.html This page has a downloadable PDF of the National Values Education Framework for Australian schools www.valueseducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/Framework_PDF_version_for_th e_web.pdf

National Statements in ICT


1. Lower secondaryYear 9 statement www.curriculum.edu.au/verve/_resources/StmntLearning_ICT_2008.pdf

Communicating with ICT Students understand how ICT can be used to enhance interpersonal relationships and how it can be used to emphasise people in other places and situations.
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They have opportunities to select different digital media, apply suitable or agreed communication conventions and protocols and to develop their own image and identity or that of a group. They acknowledge feedback and reflect on their use of ICT to communicate in a range of contexts. Ethics, issues and ICT Students have opportunities to apply codes of practice and meet expectations regarding responsible practices. Students use agreed principles to review their use of ICT in terms of safety, ethical practice, legality and responsibility. They apply principles that acknowledge ownership of digital information and develop an awareness of legislation surrounding digital theft and plagiarism.

Cross curriculum links


This unit of work can be used in any of the following subjects and topic areas: English media studies ICT identity health and well being communication SOSE the arts personal development.

Lesson resources

Technical resources
Computers

Websites
ClickNSW Public Schools technology guide http://www.schools.nsw.edu.au/news/technology/usingtechnology/yr2008/smslangua ge.php Netsmartz www.netsmartz.org Digital Native www.digitalnative.org Stay Smart Online www.staysmartonline.gov.au

The ACMA resources


CyberNetrix www.cybernetrix.com.au

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Wise Up to IT www.wiseuptoit.com.au All resources from the ACMA can be ordered at cybersafety@acma.gov.au.

Other resources
Butchers or poster paper

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Learning activities
Focus question
How and why is positive online behaviour and use of appropriate skills important when creating and communicating with different online audiences?

Contributing questions
How and why should I maintain a balanced approach to internet use? How can I create content and communicate using online tools for different purposes? How can knowledge of communication protocols and a code of conduct in relation to personal internet use help me to select and use different communication modes effectively with varied audiences? What are my responsibilities in relation to using the internet ethically to communicate? What is my online image and how might it impact on my reputation?

My internet use

Overview
Research indicates that young people spend about half of their discretionary time each day on electronic media and communications. Their total screen timei.e. time spent using a television screen or computer monitoris four hours 15 minutes per day for boys and three hours 51 minutes for girls. (Source: Media and Communications in Australian Families ACMA 2007) Some young people have issues in maintaining a balanced approach to their use of ICT. Having a sense of how much time they engage in internet, gaming and mobile activities can help individuals keep perspective.

Topic starter
Introduce the topic by asking students to monitor how long they use the internet, gaming devices and mobiles each week and to record their activities and length of their use on each occasion. Agree on some common categories for activities such as downloading music, homework etc. Use the Student technology audit available under What are students doing online? in the Schools section of the ACMA Cybersmart website , www.cybersmart.gov.au/schools.aspx Record, share and display the results as graphs. Compare results for internet use by students over the week.

Self reflection
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After examining the class graphs, ask students to consider in small groups and later as a class the following questions in relation to their use of the internet, gaming devices and mobiles: How much time am I spending on these activities for entertainment? Key issueidentifying how individuals and fellow class members spend their time online how important is technology to them. How much time am I spending on the computer for homework? Key issuesharing ideas regarding how to use the internet effectively for homeworksharing search strategies, sites etc. Do I sometimes mix homework and entertainment? Does this have an impact on homework? Key issueHow do individuals and fellow class members balance social and homework timedo they feel they have the right balance? Is peer pressure a factor with online activities? Does this impede the ability to complete work well? Explore the fact that everybody is different in terms of study styles. Some people seem to do better with regular breaks from study for social interaction while others are better off completing larger slabs of study before taking a break. Encourage class to share strategies for managing social and homework demands online. How does their online homework and socialising approach fit with the approach their parents would like them to have?

1.

Am I doing other offline activities to balance how much time I am spending online?
Explore as a class what other activities individuals engage in away from technology. What do they think is a good balance? How do they know? What do friends and family think about the time they spend online or using mobiles? Am I spending too much time on one internet-based activity? Explore as a class how to identify what an acceptable time would be. What are the key factors? What are the indicators somebody might be spending too much time on one activity? What times over the day or evening am I engaged in these activities? Do I have time to rest, eat and do offline activities? Explore whether there are issues arising for any students because of the time spent online. Are there examples of friends or family who seem to be spending too much time online? How do you help someone who is spending too much time online? What steps would you take if your friend was online all the time? Do I need to change how I allocate my time to different online and offline activities? General exploration of practical strategies to change approach to online activities if class feels this is necessary.

Online communication protocols

Overview
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The ability to connect desktop computers, laptops and handheld devices via the internet provides users with access to information and content throughout the world and facilitates speedy and efficient worldwide communication and self-expression. It is important to know online communication protocols to communicate effectively, responsibly and safely with a range of audiences for various purposes using digital tools and the internet.

Online communication protocols considered in this topic include netiquette and using appropriate online conventions and language.

Topic starter
As a class consider how good manners help to ensure successful communication. List students ideas about what it means to have good manners, for example: speak politely without rude or offensive language dont leave people out of the conversation talk kindly about other people speak in a conversational tone rather than shouting use words like please and thank you be careful not to hurt anyones feelings.

Explore the meaning of the word etiquette with the class. Discuss the combining of the words internet and etiquette to refer to good online manners as netiquette. Discuss expectations about netiquette that relate to students lives today. Ask students to identify etiquette that surrounds their use of digital communication tools. Record students ideas on butcher paper and display them. For example, points may include using appropriate emoticons and avoid capitals, as they are equivalent to shouting.

Group work
Have students form small groups to discuss the important netiquette tips for young people today, then as a class create a Netiquette tips chart, that describes how people should treat each other online, for example: Netiquette tips 1. Speak or write kindly and politely. 2. Dont exclude people. 3. Use good manners words like please and thank you. 4. Use emoticons to help people to know when a joke is friendly. 5. Keep calm and do not react or respond if you receive rude or offensive content from other people, and ask an adult for support. 6. Check your content to make sure your message is clear. 7. Respect other people and their privacy. 8. Remember your online messages may be both public and permanent.

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9. Think before you respond to rude or strange online communications. 10. Be sure about who you are replying or sending a message to. Alternatively have students design a netiquette website for primary age students that will provide them with knowledge and skills they require to ensure they communicate responsibly and respectfully with digital tools.

Web activity
Ask the students to access Angelas Experience on the Netsmartz site at http://www.netsmartz.org/resources/reallife.htm#. This clip is about netiquette and models how to respond when someone is harassing you online.

Class activity
As a class list emoticons students may use in when text messaging via SMS, when chatting or in emails, for example: :-) happy ;-) wink :-( sad or unhappy

Discuss: the effect upon people of receiving emoticons in emails or messages. How do positive messages make people feel? How might negative emoticons affect people when they receive them? the benefits of expressing negative feelings more clearly and fairly face-to-face, rather than in emails or text messages where they may be misunderstood.

Group work
Many people use acronyms in emails, chat rooms, instant messaging and with short message services (SMS) as speedy and effective ways to communicate. Give worksheet 1 to groups of three or four students and ask them to provide definitions for as many terms as they can over a specified time. Distribute the answer sheet when this time has elapsed.

Web activity
The mobile phone interactivity in Cybernetrix at http://www.cybernetrix.com.au/resources/student/lo_02_mobile_phone/lo_02_mobile _phone_activity.htm has sections on cool text terms and tips for being mobile smart. Other sections of the activity explore cyberbullying and grooming, for example contact from an adult stranger.

Work in pairs

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Ask the students to develop a piece of writing using text terms and emoticons. Use the CyberNetrix txtA3 activity available from the teacher resources tab at www.cybernetrix.gov.au. In this activity students prepare a message with advice on cybersafety and ethics.

Alternatively ask the students to write a dialogue which demonstrates netiquette and uses appropriate emoticons and acronyms.

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Communicating with different audiences

Overview
The internet is a global communication network that enables people to share information and interact together using computers and mobile internet enabled devices. Text, voice, still and moving images can all be transmitted across the internet via a range of services such as email or the web to a range of audiences across the globe. While the internet has ushered in a new and exciting ways of communicating, there are potential risks for students who require guidance in communicating appropriately with different audiences.

Topic starter
Ask students to list the different ways they communicate with the internet, gaming devices and mobiles. Suggest they think about communication broadly in terms of who they communicate with and what they post online. If the class completed the topic starter activity for topic 1 this information could be used here. Have the students consider the range of relationships they have with people online. Ask the students to draw three concentric rings on poster paper. They need to place themselves in the central ring. In the first ring students need to place people they know in real life and communicate with online. They should also note how they communicate with these people. In the second ring students need to list the people they communicate with online who they dont know in real life. They should also note how they communicate with these people. The placement of people within the rings should reflect the proximity of their relationship to the student.

Once the students have completed the rings suggest they review the relationships by asking the following questions: Do I communicate differently with people I know in real life compared with people I dont know in real life? What things might I tell or share with people online I know in real life? What things do I communicate online to people I dont know? Are there things I should not communicate to people I dont know in real life? Am I posting things in public that should not be there?

When the students have completed this activity ask the class to share some of their thoughts about online relationships. Make the point that the people furthest from the centre of the ring are the people we not share personal information with. Emphasise that the people we meet online and who are not known to us in real life may not be who they say they are.

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Web activity
Ask students complete the CyberNetrix chatroom interactivity at http://www.cybernetrix.com.au/resources/student/lo_01_chat_room/lo_01_chat_room .htm. This interaction allows students to practice making safe decisions about communicating online with someone they dont know. The interaction can be supported with the Profiling activity available from the Teacher resources tab. This activity reinforces that not everyone you meet online is who they say they are.

Group work
Break the class into small groups to investigate communicating effectively with a range of audiences using different technology-based services. Allocate different services to each group. These might include: instant messaging (MSN) text messages (SMS and MMS) chat in public forums social networking (Facebook, MySpace) blogs wikis pod or vodcasting (YouTube) virtual worlds and multiplayer online games video and photo-sharing sites (YouTube, Flickr) microblogging (Twitter).

Ask the groups to prepare a brief presentation to share with the class which addresses the following: A description of the technology and how people use it to communicate. Some benefits of using this technology. The safety information and features provided for users. Three cybersafety tips for using this technology.

Provide students with guidance in how they access and use the technology following your schools guidelines on ICT access and use within school.

My online image

Overview
People can use various digital and online technologies to selectively promote and embellish representations of their image and identity through the creation of online avatars and profiles. However, students should be encouraged to consider concepts such as digital footprints and online reputation and the persistent nature of the web.
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Topic starter
View the clip Digital Dossier by the Digital Native Project at http://www.digitalnative.org/MediaProjects/DigitalDossier/. This video outlines how our digital footprints are formed, the implications of digital dossiers for the present and future and how they affect what we publish.

Self reflection
Ask students about their online presence. Do they have a social networking profile? Are there any photos of themselves online? Do they participate in forums or play multiplayer games. Ask them if someone were to review your online presence what could they find out about you?

Group work
In groups of four, ask the students to review their current social networking profile if they have one, or to create a profile if they dont have one. Students who need to create a profile can either use pencil and paper or a program such as PowerPoint for the purpose of this activity. Ask each student in the group to play one of the following roles when commenting on a students profile: parent, grandparent or carer close friend employer.

Every students profile needs to be considered from the point of view of each of the roles. Questions to be considered as part of the review might include: Is the profile appropriate? What do the photos in the profile reveal about the person? Is the information provided personal? Would this profile attract unwanted attention?

After the review has been completed remind students of the concept of digital footprints introduced at the start of this topic and the notion of reputation and the need to protect it. Emphasise that once content is posted to the web it remains there into the future. Check if anyone in the class has decided to change their profile, Conclude the activity with a reminder that students should check that their profiles are set to private. However, remind students that they cannot completely rely on the privacy settings if they accept friends who are not known to them in real life.

Going further
A video Privacy is available in the Budd:e secondary school module at www.staysmartonline.gov.au/budd-e/secondary/index.html from the Department of
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Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy. This video covers concepts such as digital footprints, reputation, online friends and privacy. CyberNetrix at www.cybernetrix.gov.au has an activity RLWU that contains a class technology survey project, report and cybersafety advertising campaign. This project can take between three and 10 periods depending on activity approach and access to technology. The Click website provides information about language used when text messaging. For more information about acronyms and abbreviations visit

http://www.schools.nsw.edu.au/news/technology/usingtechnology/yr2008/smslangua ge.php

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Worksheets
Worksheet 1: Fill in the meaning of the acronyms below
Acronym AAMOF ABT AFK AKA ASAP ASL B4N BBS BRB BTW CU DND EOD F2F FAQ G2B GBH GF GN HAND HMWK IC ILU IMHO IS Definition Acronym IWALY K KIT LNK LOL LTR MYOB M8 PAW PLZ PPL QT SH SRY SWAK THX TMI TOY TT2T TTFN TTUL TU *G* *H* *K* Definition

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Teacher key
Acronym AAMOF ABT AFK AKA ASAP ASL B4N BBS BRB BTW CU DND EOD F2F FAQ G2B GBH GF GN HAND HMWK IC ILU IMHO IS Definition as a matter of fact about away from keyboard Otherwise known as as soon as possible age, sex, location bye for now be back so on be right back by the way see you do not disturb end of discussion face to face frequently asked questions going to bed great big hug girlfriend good night have a nice day homework I see I love you in my humble opinion I'm sorry Acronym IWALY K KIT LNK LOL LTR MYOB M8 PAW PLZ PPL QT SH SRY SWAK THX TMI TOY TT2T TTFN TTUL TU *G* *H* *K* Definition I will always love you kiss keep in touch love and kisses laughing out loud long term relationship mind your own business mate parents are watching please people cutie so hot sorry sealed with a kiss thanks too much information thinking of you too tired to talk ta ta for now talk to you later thank you giggle or grin hug kiss

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For more information, contact the Australian Communications and Media Authority Cybersafety Contact Centre Tel: 1800 880 176 Email: cybersafety@acma.gov.au www.cybersmart.gov.au

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Appendix D Unit of work Lower secondary ages 1213


I am what I postsharing ethical and responsible practices

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Contents
I am what I postsharing ethical and responsible practices .......................................... 53 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 53 Before you start ........................................................................................................... 53 Unit overview ................................................................................................................... 53 Aims ............................................................................................................................. 53 Objectives .................................................................................................................... 53 Length of time required for lessons ............................................................................. 54 Key concepts ............................................................................................................... 54 Curriculum and learning resources links ......................................................................... 54 National curriculum connections ................................................................................. 54 Cross curriculum links ................................................................................................. 55 Lesson resources ........................................................................................................ 55 Learning activities ............................................................................................................ 56 Plagiarism .................................................................................................................... 56 Copyright ..................................................................................................................... 58 Illegal downloads ......................................................................................................... 59 Going further ................................................................................................................ 61

Creative Commons These teaching resources on the Cybersmart websites Schools Gateway are now available to schools under Creative Commons licences. The new licensing conditions are more flexible than existing copyright, enabling schools and teachers to use, adapt and re-publish material from the resource, without seeking permission to republish from the ACMA. These materials have been licensed under an attribution non-commercial share alike license (BY-NC-SA). Under these licenses, the materials are available for free use and adaptation so teachers can change, translate and share new creations with other teachers and students. Copyright Notice Source: Commonwealth of Australia 2009

This work is based on materials that constitute copyright of the Commonwealth of Australia and is licensed under a

Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike 2.5 Australia Licence.


Disclaimer: The ACMA has taken reasonable care to ensure the information in this work is correct and accurate at the time of publication. However, the ACMA makes no warranties regarding the correctness of the information at later dates, and disclaims liability for damages resulting from its use. The ACMA recommends that users exercise their own independent skill and judgment when using this work and carefully evaluate the accuracy, currency, completeness and relevance of the material for their purposes. The ACMA requests that if you republish this work, you notify the ACMA by email at:

cybersafety@acma.gov.au including a link to the republished work. This is to assist us in


tracking the uptake of our works and the innovative uses that our licensees are making of our works. See: more information

http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/Legal/Copyright.aspx for

Unit of WorkLower secondary ages 1213


I am what I postsharing ethical and responsible practices
Introduction
The internet provides a wealth of opportunities to be entertained, communicate and collaborate with diverse audiences. Unlike the traditional mass media, the internet and readily available digital tools allow people to be both consumers and creators of content. Learning about ownership of digital content and the rules and laws governing internet use can, in part, help students to contribute to ethical, respectful and responsible internet use. This unit covers the following topics: copyright plagiarism illegal downloads.

Teachers should review all suggested websites, videos and other digital content before use in the classroom to ensure that it meets school guidelines and student needs.

Before you start


Have you checked the behaviours and skills levels of your students? If not, visit What are students doing online? in the Schools section on the ACMA Cybersmart website www.cybersmart.gov.au/schools.aspx to assess their skills. This section also provides information on children and technology, including cybercitizen profiles, videos of students discussing their online activities and links to the ACMA research.

Unit overview
Aims
This unit aims to help students to: increase their understanding of the rights and responsibilities that are a part of ethical internet use including respecting copyright and acknowledging the impact of plagiarism and illegal downloading.

Objectives
By the end of this unit, students will be able to: explain key responsibilities in relation to using the internet ethically in the context of using content developed by other people understand how to avoid plagiarism understand the potential consequences of illegal downloads for themselves and others.

Length of time required for lessons


6 x 45 minute lessons (approx.)

Key concepts
To check how these concepts apply to your learning program, explore Learning pathways Lower secondary in the Teacher resources section on the ACMA Cybersmart website www.cybersmart.gov.au/schools.aspx.

Curriculum and learning resources links


National curriculum connections

Values Education
National Values Education website with the Nine Values for Australian Schooling. www.valueseducation.edu.au/values/val_national_framework_for_values_educati on,8757.html This page has a downloadable PDF of the National Values Education Framework for Australian school www.valueseducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/Framework_PDF_version_for_th e_web.pdf

National Statements in ICT


Lower secondaryYear 7 statement from www.curriculum.edu.au/verve/_resources/StmntLearning_ICT_2008.pdf

Communicating with ICT Students understand how ICT can be used to enhance interpersonal relationships and how it can be used to emphasise people in other places and situations. They have opportunities to select different digital media, apply suitable or agreed communication conventions and protocols, and to develop their own image and identity or that of a group. They acknowledge feedback and reflect on their use of ICT to communicate in a range of contexts. Ethics, issues and ICT Students have opportunities to apply codes of practice and meet expectations regarding responsible practices. Students use agreed principles to review their use of ICT in terms of safety, ethical practice, legality and responsibility. They apply principles that acknowledge ownership of digital information and develop an awareness of legislation surrounding digital theft and plagiarism.

Cross curriculum links


This unit of work can be used in any of the following subjects and topic areas: English media studies ICT communication SOSE the arts.

Lesson resources

Technical resources
Computers

Websites
All Right to Copy www.activated.act.edu.au Cybersmart www.cybersmart.gov.au/Teens.aspx Stay Smart Online www.staysmartonline.gov.au Frank Hardcase www.frankhardcase.com.au/

The ACMA resources


Wise Up to IT www.wiseuptoit.com.au All resources from the ACMA can be ordered online at cybersafety@acma.gov.au.

Learning activities
Focus questions
How and why am I personally responsible for appropriate, ethical and respectful use of the internet?

Contributing questions
What are my rights and responsibilities in relation to appropriate, respectful and ethical internet use? How and why should I use my knowledge of internet protocols to develop a code of conduct and procedures on personal internet use that cover copyright, plagiarism and illegal downloads?

Plagiarism

Overview
The internet provides ready access to digital tools that enable people to readily create or synthesise online content including text, music and images. However, often they do not realise how serious it is to copy or to use the creative work of others. Taking someones work and pretending that it is yours or using their work without acknowledging who created it is like stealing. In some cases, people face fines or are sued for plagiarism. To avoid plagiarism students need to understand how to reference a work correctly.

Topic starter
Show video clips from the All Right to Copy section of the ACT Department of Education, Youth and Family Services website at activated.act.edu.au/copyright/artc/index.htm. In the videos, two students, Donna and Joe, are trying to put together a website for a web design competition. Along the way they confront the issues of seeking permission to use other peoples work in their project including text, images, film and website referencing. They also learn how to avoid plagiarism.

Class discussion and activity


Discuss with students the meaning of the word plagiarism. For example: unethical or unfair use of other peoples work using or allowing others to think that words, productions or other content that was created by someone else is your own work taking content from a source and letting people think it is your new or original work.

Ask students in pairs to list 2 or 3 things explaining why plagiarism is unfair to a content owner.

As a class, brainstorm ways that plagiarism can be avoided, such as: taking care not to submit the work of other people as though it is your own work providing credit to the originator of words or ideas and giving details about the source of any content created by someone else using quotation marks to show if words were written or spoken by someone else.

Display, discuss and clarify a definition of plagiarism, such as: Plagiarism involves the theft or stealing of someones work. It also involves fraud, by lying about or omitting to acknowledge the source of the material.

Copyright

Overview
Copyright protects a content owners rights to use or exploit a work. People who own a work such as music, an article or an image can decide how that work can be used through copyright. For example, they may wish to allow their work to be used free for education but it cannot be sold on. How a work is used by a content consumer is subject to its licence. Students need to understand that a work is subject to copyright, and that they may seek to access and use that work in keeping with its licence or under the exemptions in the copyright act. As content creators, they may wish to protect their rights as the owner and apply a licence to their work.

Topic starter
Ask students to look at the information on copyright on the All Right to Copy section at activated.act.edu.au/copyright/artc/index.htm and to complete the quiz to assess their understanding.

Activity in pairs
The video Ownership produced by the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy is available in the Budd:e secondary school module at www.staysmartonline.gov.au/budd-e/secondary/index.html. It provides an overview of ownership from both the content creator and consumer perspectives. Ask the students to watch the video on ownership and consider the following questions: What is copyright? What are the responsibilities of content consumers? Why are some content creators happy for their work to be shared? Why do people want to be acknowledged for their work? Why cant you post someone elses work online? Who should make money out of a work?

Illegal downloads

Overview
The use of the internet to download music, games, films and other forms of entertainment or content raises many complicated and controversial issues in relation to ethics and the violation of copyright. Educating students about the legal and ethical aspects of illegal downloading offers the best opportunity to minimise the ethics gap that allows otherwise law-abiding young people to break the rules.

Topic starter
As a class, brainstorm titles of content that students have recently downloaded using the internet. Have students form small groups to select six different types of content from the class list, such as information from a website, music or a game, and work together to complete a chart such as the one that follows. Type of content Title of content Who created the content? Who owns the content? Was permission given for you to download the content? Is it legal or illegal for you to download this content? Why?

Class discussion
Provide students with the following scenario: A group of young people formed a band. They worked hard to save enough money to record their songs to create a CD. They then posted one of the songs for free download on a website to promote their album, which is available for purchase. You really like the song.

As a class, discuss: Is it fair to download the bands album from a peer-to-peer website onto your MP3 player without buying the CD?

Activity in pairs
The video Sharing produced by the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy is available in the Budd:e secondary school module at www.staysmartonline.gov.au/budd-e/secondary/index.html. It provides an overview of sharing content via peer-to-peer networks. Ask the students to watch the video on sharing and to list the major points made in the video.

Class activity
Have the class debate: Use of peer-to-peer file-sharing services to illegally download films and other digital content is unfair to the creators. Have the students use their notes on the video Sharing to inform the debate. Point out to students that use of peer-to-peer file-sharing services to download content is not only often illegal, it threatens the livelihoods of people. Discuss who can be affected and how. In addition, file sharing can open your computer, enabling people to see your files including personal information or content, including photos and videos, which can lead to identity theft or inappropriate postings and can also allow viruses, worms, and trojans to invade your computer.

Web activity
Encourage students to view the Frank Hardcase animation found at www.frankhardcase.com.au. This animation is part of a Crime Stoppers Australia initiative against music piracy. It features animated character Frank Hardcase, an investigative journalist whose lighthearted but insightful reports provoke students to consider the effects of illegal file sharing. In this episode, Frank interviews Jason, a young music fan unaware of the effect his illegal downloads might be having on his favourite artists, and Sassy, a singer who has been forced to give up her dream of becoming a professional musician after her debut album failed to sell because it was illegally file shared. The campaign also involved a school competition based around the animation. While this has closed, competition requirements could be used as an in-class challenge. Students could be invited to create an anti-piracy awareness campaign fashioned on the Frank Hardcase animation and characters.

Watch a video
Provide opportunities for students to engage with the video What the? found at www.wiseuptoit.com.au.

In this video, the boys computer takes ages to load programs and open files, and he is bombarded with pop-ups. His internet settings have changed and strange things are happening to his email and online accounts. The computer has spywaremalicious software that spies on his every move. Discuss the following questions: What happened? Why did it happen? What type of content was the boy downloading? How does downloading illegal content pose risks to e-security? What did the boy do to protect himself and his computer? How can you protect yourself from this sort of thing? What other problems might be associated with illegal downloading?

A lesson plan and student handout is available to support this video.

Going further
Australian songwriters and musicians discuss the realities of life as an artist. See the video at www.in-tune.com.au/Content.aspx?PageID=163. Nothing beats the real thing provided by the IP Awareness Trust and created by the Australian Teachers of Media at www.copyrightorcopywrong.info considers film piracy, illegal downloading and copyright. The site contains a number of teaching resources. Smart Copying: the official guide to copyright issues for Australian schools and TAFEs from the Copyright Advisory Group of the Ministerial Council on Education, Employment and Youth Affairs provides national copyright guidelines, FAQs and information sheets at www.smartcopying.edu.au/scw/go/pid/862. The Australian Copyright Council at www.copyright.org.au is an independent non-profit organisation that provides information, advice and training about copyright in Australia. It produces publications, conducts research and makes submissions on copyright policy issues. The MyBytes website at www.mybytes.com allows young people to find out firsthand why it is important to have the right to receive credit for your idea when you create something and to have a say in how others use it. The MyBytes Music Mixer and Showcase is designed to help young people to see how this works for musicians, filmmakers, video game programmers and other creative people. It also provides interviews with creative professionals and students, and stories to help users understand the value of protecting creative rights, and what it means to be a good digital citizen. The creative commons website at www.creativecommons.org.au contains information on licensing your work so that others can build on it in a way that is consistent with the laws of copyright.

For more information, contact the Australian Communications and Media Authority Cybersafety Contact Centre Tel: 1800 880 176 Email: cybersafety@acma.gov.au www.cybersmart.gov.au