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Planning the inquiry

1. What is our purpose? To inquire into the following:

Class/grade: School:

Age group: 9-10 School code: 006610

Oak Forest ES

transdisciplinary theme (Unit 2)


How the world works

Teacher(s): Ward, Harwell, Dhillon, Thorne, Forman, Pettit Date: Sept. 24-Nov. 2, 2012 Proposed duration: 30 over number of weeks: 6

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

PYP planner

2. What do we want to learn? central idea:


What are the key concepts (form, function, causation, change, connection, perspective, responsibility, reflection) to be emphasized within this inquiry? Key Concepts: Summative assessment task(s): What are the possible ways of assessing students understanding of the central idea? What evidence, including student-initiated actions, will we look for? Form Change Function

The human race is impacted by the quest for knowledge.

Related concepts: properties, behavior, transformation What lines of inquiry will define the scope of the inquiry into the central idea? Different forms of energy Physical processes Generalizations of properties

Students will plan a trip from one location to another utilizing all forms of energy to get there. Students will be given a beginning latitude and longitude and an ending latitude and longitude. They will need to determine their locations and then use all the forms of energy (chemical, electrical, mechanical, and radiant) during their trip. Students will work in groups to research and prepare a presentation of their trip. We will look for students ability to locate their start and end points, their ability to correctly use all the energy sources during the trip, and their ability to verbalize their exploration.

What teacher questions/provocations will drive these inquiries? 1. 2. 3. What forms of energy did you observe in your observation? What knowledge did you use to find your point in the room? How does matter change from one state to another?

Provocation 1. Students will observe and describe different kinds of energy using this experiment. Students will mix vinegar and steel wool, turn on a light bulb, and bend a copper wire back and forth, all of which create heat that the student can observe. Students can record the different kinds of energy they observed in a data table. (see science book pg. 273) 2. The teacher will layout a grid on the floor and place numbers at each end of each line in such a manner to mimic longitude and latitude. Students will be given an index card when they enter the classroom explaining that they should find the point listed on the card and stand at the point in the room. Teacher questions will then follow.

Taught: International Baccalaureate Organization 2007 September 24-October 26, 2012 Revised: November 14, 2012

Planning the inquiry

3. How might we know what we have learned?


This column should be used in conjunction with How best might we learn? What are the possible ways of assessing students prior knowledge and skills? What evidence will we look for? The provocations for this unit will allow us to assess some prior knowledge in regards to heat and plotting points. In both provocations, the teacher will look for the students ability to access internal knowledge about heat and point plotting.

4. How best might we learn?


What are the learning experiences suggested by the teacher and/or students to encourage the students to engage with the inquiries and address the driving questions? The teacher provides the context for inquiry. Leading and facilitating student inquiry. To look at how matter changes state, students will start with a solid ice cube, allow it to melt, and then heat it to watch it evaporate. To look at different forms of energy, teacher can present students with existing resources such as the lights in the room, materials from provocation 1, and other materials as needed to ensure all forms of energy are observed. Students will observe physical processes by introducing wind and water to an area of ground at the school. Students will generalize about the result of introducing these resources to the existing landscape.

What are the possible ways of assessing student learning in the context of the lines of inquiry? What evidence will we look for?

We will assess the students learning through the summative activity which incorporates all the lines of inquiry. We will look for the students ability to locate their start and end points, their ability to correctly use all the energy sources during the trip, and their ability to verbalize their exploration through the use of oral presentation. A rubric will be given prior to beginning the summative project. Multiple choice formative assessments will be given to assess content-specific material. We will be looking for a passing score. Teacher will ask higher order thinking questions throughout the learning processes to assess students knowledge.

What opportunities will occur for transdisciplinary skills development and for the development of the attributes of the learner profile? Transdisciplinary skills Thinking skills: Acquisition of knowledge, vocabulary development, and gaining facts. Research skills: observing; during the hands-on and summative activities students will use all their senses to gain understanding. Learner Profile Inquirers: Asking questions and researching information Thinkers: thinking creatively and critically about the generalizations towards energy forms Communicators: Being able to explain how energy can be used in various ways.

5. What resources need to be gathered?


What people, places, audio-visual materials, related literature, music, art, computer software, etc, will be available? Resources will be used to broaden and develop the understanding of the unit activities. Oh the Places You Will Go by Dr. Seuss (ISBN: 9780679805274) Reading stories from Pearson Reading Street textbook: Grandfathers Journey, Horned Toad Prince, Letters Home from Yosemite (ISBN: 0-328-22121-x) McMillan/McGraw-Hill Science-A Closer Look-Grade 4 chapters 6, 7, & 8 (ISBN:978-0-02-287753-8) Houghton Mifflin Social Studies Grade 4 Chapter 1 (ISBN: 978-0-618-93906-0) United Streaming: Getting to Know: Energy; Properties of Matter: Parts 1 and 2; Globes and Us (www.discovereducation.com) How will the classroom environment, local environment, and/or the community be used to facilitate the inquiry? We will use the classroom to plot our points for the provocation. We will use the landscape around the school. Taught: International Baccalaureate Organization 2007 September 24-October 26, 2012 Revised: November 14, 2012

Reflecting on the inquiry

6. To what extent did we achieve our purpose?


Assess the outcome of the inquiry by providing evidence of students understanding of the central idea. The reflections of all teachers involved in the planning and teaching of the inquiry should be included. We did not achieve our purpose with this unit due to District testing, mandated reteaching, and extracurricular activities.

7. To what extent did we include the elements of the PYP?


What were the learning experiences that enabled students to: develop an understanding of the concepts identified in What do we want to learn? o o Students completed KWL chart regarding their knowledge of different forms of energy. Graphic organizers were used throughout to help organize information.

demonstrate the learning and application of particular transdisciplinary skills? o Students were able to corporate effectively by assigning a variety of tasks and jobs to complete various science experiments.

How you could improve on the assessment task(s) so that you would have a more accurate picture of each students understanding of the central idea.

develop particular attributes of the learner profile and/or attitudes? o Students were able to communicate and cooperate effectively. In addition, through presentations, students were ablet o gain more confidence. Also, students were able to demonstrate empathy toward one another.

We could improve the assessment task by managing the time better, coming up with more realistic goals, and breaking up the assessment into smaller parts.

What was the evidence that connections were made between the central idea and the transdisciplinary theme?

There were scientific connections that worked well such as physical properties and matter; however, the central idea needs to be rewritten in order to make a clear connection.

Taught: September 24-October 26, 2012 International Baccalaureate Organization 2007 Revised: November 14, 2012

Reflecting on the inquiry

8. What student-initiated inquiries arose from the learning?


Record a range of student-initiated inquiries and student questions and highlight any that were incorporated into the teaching and learning.

9. Teacher notes

What is the difference between matter and mass? What is the difference between mass and weight? Why cant I see the lines of longitude and latitude on the ground?

Teachers need to plan better, quality experiments to teach the material. Teachers were overwhelmed by the number of SPIs that were included in this unit. The central idea needs to be re-evaluated in order to better serve the focus of the unit.

At this point teachers should go back to box 2 What do we want to learn? and highlight the teacher questions/provocations that were most effective in driving the inquiries.

What student-initiated actions arose from the learning?


Record student-initiated actions taken by individuals or groups showing their ability to reflect, to choose, and to act.

Several experiments were performed to help students understand matter versus mass. Students watched BrainPop video to help with understanding of longitude and latitude.

Taught: September 24-October 26, 2012 International Baccalaureate Organization 2007 Revised: November 14, 2012