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Annotated Bibliography Primary Sources "12/21/1937: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs premieres." American History 42.

5 (2007): 19. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 19 Jan. 2013. This article provided important information about the cost and earnings of the film. It also contained information about the premiere of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs at Carthay Circle Theater in Los Angeles. Boone, Andrew R. Putting A Fairy Tale on Screen. Popular Science, January 1938. http://books.google.com/books?id=OygDAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PP1&pg= PA50#v=onepage&q&f=false. This magazine was extremely helpful. Because this source is a science magazine, it contained information about the technology involved in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The sections that described the processes of Technicolor, Sound, and the Multiplane Camera were extremely helpful. D23: The Official Disney Fan. "D23s From the Archives: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Disney D23." Disney D23. http://d23.disney.go.com/news/2012/11/d23s-fro m-the-archives-snow-whiteand-the-seven-dwarfs/ (accessed January 19, 2013). This source is the official Disney website that contains detailed information on their films as well as pictures and videos. This website supplied us with good images of posters and the people involved with Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. "Disney's First Princess Remembers Becoming Snow White, Disney Insider." Disney.com The official Home Page for all things Disney. http://disney.go.com/disneyinsider/insider/article/20090929 (accessed January 20, 2013). This source is the official Disney website that contains detailed information on their films as well as pictures, videos, and additional information and news about Disneys projects. This website really provided substantial information for our live model section of our website. It also contained quality quotes from one of the models mentioned. Disney. How Walt Disney Cartoons are Made. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OebUzEhSLBI&list=PL4IYJNt9JVyTjDECM GSe9x9TcVFCPPpzk. This source is an interesting video that goes into detail about the animation process of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The information provided covers topics such as the

drawing process and how the color seen in the animation is created from scratch by chemists in the Disney studio. Disney. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Theatrical Trailer 1937. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kWr9e4JN5I&list=PL4IYJNt9JVyTjDECM GSe9x9TcVFCPPpzk. This source is an informative video that demonstrated how important technicolor and sound was at that time. This video also provided the quotation that can be found on the Snow White page on our website. Disney. Snow White Meets Her Prince deleted Scene. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKxpf3KPEXs&list=PL4IYJNt9JVyTjDECM GSe9x9TcVFCPPpzk. This source provides a first-hand look on how the storyboard works in accordance with the animation process. It also shows the deleted scene when Snow White meets the prince in the animation, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. This video can also be found on our Snow White: Multimedia page on our website. Disney. Snow White Music in Your Soup. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crOEaocgOU&list=PL4IYJNt9JVyTjDECMGSe9x9TcVFCPPpzk. This source is a video that shows the animation process of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. At this stage in the animation, we can see the characters moving and hear audio, but there is no color. http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_so5D5tR2FXw/TLs2Xi73H_I/AAAAAAAAAEM/PIPJeIlbqk g/s1600/Marge+Champion+01.jpg. This source provides an image of Marge Champion as Snow White. This image can be found on our Live Models page on our website. Library of Congress. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/search/?q=snow%20white. The Library of Congress is the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections.This source provided extremely helpful sketches of the preliminary versions of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs which we used in our slideshow on the homepage of our website.

Louis Hightower and Marge Champion. Library of Congress Archive Project 2012. Last modified July 23, 2012.http://dhcfellow2012loc.wor dpress.com/2012/07/23/Louis-hightower-and-marge-champion/. The Library of Congress is the nation's oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. It is also the largest library in the world, with millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collections.This source contained images of Marge Champion and Louis Hightower as they worked on Snow White. They can be found on our Live Models page on our website. Mcelvaine, Robert S. "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." Encyclopedia of the Great Depression. Ed. Robert S. McElvaine. Vol. 2. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 892-893. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 20 Jan. 2013. This article described the responses to the film and contained quality quotations. Miller, Diane DisneyMartin, Pete. 1956. Disneys Folly. Saturday Evening Post 229, no. 25: 24. MasterFILE Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed January 20, 2013). This magazine was extremely helpful because it described the process of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, from Walt Disneys perspective. This magazine really expands on certain situations mentioned in the secondary sources and includes bits of information not mentioned in other sources. "Mouse & Man." American Decades Primary Sources. Ed. Cynthia Rose. Vol. 4: 1930-1939. Detroit: Gale, 2004. 38-41. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 19 Jan. 2013. This article spoke of Walt Disneys prior success in shorts and states that Snow Whites creation was tied to the Depression. The article also explains the significance of the movie in Walt Disneys career. Pogue, Paul F.P. "Animated Films." St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. Ed. Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast. Vol. 1. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000. 90-92. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 18 Jan. 2013. Although this article did not have a big section on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the section contained specific information. It emphasized the importance of the film as well as the technical advances made in the film. It explains that the movie paved the way for other feature films.

Secondary Sources Animated Film Timeline, History of Animated Film Evolution. About. http://movies.about.com/od/animatedmovies/a/history-animated-films.htm (accecssed January 20, 2013. It gave good information about the history of animation so we used in the timeline. Beck, Jerry. Animated Movie Guide: The Ultimate Illustrated Reference to Cartoon, Stop-Motion and Computer-Generated Feature Films. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2007. http://site.ebrary.com/lib/iolani/docDetail.action?docID=10173857 (accessed January 13, 2013). This source was crucial in understanding the history of feature animation films as well as the significance of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. It covered the financial challenges Walt Disney faced with Snow White and explained why the technical aspects of Snow White was so monumental to animation. This book also provided good information on Prince of Achmed which allowed comparison between the two films. Finch, Christopher. The Art of Walt Disney: from Mickey Mouse to the Magic Kingdoms. New York: H.N. Abrams, 1975. This book was an extremely helpful source. It provided information on Disneys early days before feature animation when he was still making shorts. It also provided beautiful and informative pictures that illustrated the process of animation. Lastly, there is an entire chapter devoted to Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs that is extremely helpful and details the process the film went through to reach the final product. Finch, Christopher. Walt Disneys America. New York: Abbeville Press, 1978. This source explores some of the ways in which Walt Disney was formed by America, and in return how his work transformed American customs and character into universal fantasy. This was a useful source for our project because our turning point was Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and this book contained one whole chapter dedicated to this film, explaining the process of its conception and production. This information was used to discuss the uncharted territories that Disney ventured into and his successes and critical reception the product received. There are also many great pictures and sketches of Snow White that will be put to use to visually enhance the website. Holliss, Richard, and Brian Sibley. The Disney Studio Story. New York: Crown, 1988. This book tells the story of the Disney films. There is a section containing information on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs and explained what Disney was like before Snow White, the movie-making process, and the effect that Snow White had on later Disney

films. http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/12/04/article-2242722-1657FE04000005DC339_634x474.jpg Image used on website. Maltin, Leonard. The Disney Films. New York: Crown, 1973. This book contained a specific chapter on Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, and gave important background information. The book has a long overview of the movie, which helped to refresh our memory. The book also contained many snippets of interviews from animators and people involved with the film making. These interviews helped explain the complexity of the animation process and this film in general. Lastly, this book also talked about the impact Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs had on later films, which helped us to prove the film was a turning point. Obalil, Linda J. "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs." International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers. Ed. Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast. 4th ed. Vol. 1: Films. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000. 1119-1121. Gale U.S. History In Context. Web. 23 Jan. 2013. This article gave important statistics about the movie as well as an in-depth look at the technology used in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. It covers the problems that the animators faced and solved with technology. Opening Night, 1937: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Premiers at Carthay Circle Theatre. Disney Parks Blog. http://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2011/12/opening-night-1937-snow white-and-the-seven-dwarfs-premieres-at-carthay-circle-theatre/ (accessed January 20, 2013). This source was a good article about the premier and it also contains good pictures used on our website. Quality Information Publishers. Gullivers Travels (1939). http://www.qualityinformationpublishers.com/sku-1291/. Image used on website.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs: The Creation of a Classic. The Walt Disney

Family Collection. http://www.waltdisney.org/snow-white. This source is the oficial website of the Walt Disney Family Museum, a museum dedicated to the history of Walt Disney and his films. This website contains background on the creating of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. An image used on our website also came from this source. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs-The Grandaddy of Them All, and Still the Best. Animated Film Reviews. http://animatedfilmreviews.blogspot.com/2012/1 1/snow-white-and-seven-dwarfs-1937.html (accessed January 16, 2013). This source was used for its pictures from the Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The 6 Most Unforgivable Animation Oscar Moments. Cartoon Brew. http://www.cartoonbrew.com/ideas-commentary/the-6-most-unforgivableanimation-oscars-37422.html (accessed January 17, 2013). This source was used for Walt Disneys awards ceremony picture.

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