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BLANCHING BLANCHIR

Blanching is not strictly a Principle of cookery but a preliminary process to which many types of food are subjected before further cooking takes place. The term to Blanch comes from the French word Blanc that means white. Often this is exactly what the cookery term to Blanch means; to make white. There are different ways of blanching food and different reasons for doing so. We may blanch by plunging food into COLD WATER and raising the temperature to boiling point, or we may plunge food into BOILING WATER and return to boiling point or finally we may blanch certain foods, usually potatoes in HOT OIL. Each method of blanching is suitable for different types of food and serves different purposes. The main method of heat transference employed in Blanching is CONDUCTION. In this process heat is transferred to the surface of the food by conduction from the cooking medium (water or oil) and then conducted from the surface to the inside of the food. TEMPERATURE RANGE: Food that is blanched in water will be plunged into either cold water or into boiling water at 100 degree C. Food that is blanched in oil will be plunged into oil at a temperature between 130 and 165 degree C. The required temperature will be determined by the thickness, texture and density of the food and the standard required. The reason for blanching food ingredients and the method used:

FOOD COMMOD ITY

METHOD OF BLAN CHIN G Cold water

REASON FOR BLANCHING

END USE

Beef bones

To make white and to remove impurities To make absorbent To allow bulk preparation in advance with no spoilage To remove skin

White beef stock

Turned potatoes Mignonette potatoes

Cold water Hot oil

Roasted potatoes Fried as required for service Use in salads sauces, garnishes etc., In preparation for freezing or for final cooking later

Tomatoes

Boiling water

Broccoli / Spinach

Boiling water

To par or pre-cook

Source: Foundation stage OCLD: Module F101 A