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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

(International English version) by Scott MacKenzie, Simon Gilbert, Geoffrey Moore Langdon, David Byrnes, Ralph Grabowski

Graphisoft
Visit the Graphisoft website at http://www.graphisoft.com for local distributor and product availability information.

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users


(International English version) ISBN 978-963-06-6538-4 Copyright 2008 by Graphisoft, all rights reserved. Reproduction, paraphrasing or translation without express prior written permission is strictly prohibited.

Trademarks
ArchiCAD is a registered trademark and PlotMaker, Virtual Building, StairMaker and GDL are trademarks of Graphisoft. All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders.

Contents

CONTENTS
Introduction_______________________________________________ 5 Leveraging What You Already Know of CAD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Get Up to Speed More Quickly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 The Purpose of This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Online Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Chapter 1: AutoCAD User, Meet ArchiCAD _____________________ 7 Why Use ArchiCAD?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Advantages to ArchiCAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Single Building Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Space Planning. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Generating Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Working as a Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Nomenclature: The Same, the Different, and the New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Concepts That Are Similar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Viewing Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Concepts That Are Different . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Concepts That Are New . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 How Far to Go with 3D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 ArchiCAD as a Supplement in the AutoCAD Firm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Transitioning from AutoCAD to ArchiCAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Chapter 2: Workflow ________________________________________15 Project Workflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Project Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 View Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Layout Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Publisher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Chapter 3: ArchiCAD Methods _______________________________17 Touring the ArchiCAD User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Overview of the User Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Palettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Other Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Typing Commands vs. Modal Operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Layers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Changing Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Setting Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Noun-Verb Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Selecting Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Drawing by Mousing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Entering Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Relative & Cartesian Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Object Snaps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Creating Modules and Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Group (Block) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 GDL Object (WBlock). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Layers & Layer Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Model View Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Place External Drawing (Image) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Merge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Xrefs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 TeamWork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Hotlinked Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Chapter 4: Editing with ArchiCAD ___________________________ 26 Drag (Move) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Drag a Copy (Copy) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Drag Multiple Copy (Copy Multiple) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Multiply (Array) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Resize (Scale) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Rotate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Mirror. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Click to Trim (Trim) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Adjust (Extend) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Fillet and Chamfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Polylines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Offset & Repetitive Offset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Chapter 5: ArchiCAD Tutorials ______________________________ 29 Starting ArchiCAD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Tutorial #1: Creating a Floorplan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Preparing the Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Placing the Walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Placing Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Contents

Placing Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Inserting an Empty Opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Adding the Floor Slab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Placing Furnishings (Objects) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Adding Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Automatic Hip Roof Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Generating Section and Elevation Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Tutorial #2: Curtain Wall Tutorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Creating the Structural Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Space Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Creating Curtain Walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Placing the Floor Slab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3D Viewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Inserting Elevators, Escalators, and Stairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Creating Additional Stories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Refinements to the Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Partial Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 3D Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Advantages over Xrefs and Paperspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Tutorial #3: Creating a Plot Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Plot Layouts and Multi-scale Drawing Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Tutorial #4: Making a Custom Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Create a Custom Window Object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Chapter 6: Transferring Drawings ____________________________ 54 How to Transfer 2D and 3D Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Importing from AutoCAD to ArchiCAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 DWG Import. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Translators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Evaluating the Translation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Text Translation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Adding Layer Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Exporting from ArchiCAD to AutoCAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Exporting to 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Exporting in 2D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 The Translator File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Exporting with the Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Using AutoCAD Xrefs in ArchiCAD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

Intelligence Lost. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 IFC Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 ArchiCAD Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 AutoCAD Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Chapter 7: Productivity Techniques ___________________________60 ArchiCAD Customization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Shortcut Keystrokes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Custom Line Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Selection Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Selecting by Object Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Find & Select . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Add-Ons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Selection and Element Information Palettes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Special ArchiCAD Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Favorites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Batch Output with the Publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Beyond Customizing the Graphic Tools of ArchiCAD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 New & Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference _______________________64 Selecting Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Tool Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 ArchiCAD Command Equivalents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Appendix B: ArchiCAD-AutoCAD Glossary ____________________69 ArchiCAD-AutoCAD Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Cursor Forms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Crosshair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Arrow with Snap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Mercedes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Checkmark . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Pencil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Magic Wand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Eyedropper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Scissors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Appendix C: Teamwork Roles & Permissions ___________________73 Acknowledgements_________________________________________74 Index ____________________________________________________75

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Introduction

INTRODUCTION
This book is designed to quickly make you productive in ArchiCAD by leveraging what you already know about AutoCAD. It will be an essential companion to your ArchiCAD Users Guide. Although ArchiCAD is a Building Information Modeling package and AutoCAD is primarily a 2D drafting tool, data in 2D and 3D can be passed between the applications. rather than having to break from design early to start the creation of 2D documentation, such as plans sections and elevations. This is because the documentation is automatically updated in the background while the model is being created.

Get Up to Speed More Quickly


You probably spent weeks learning the basics of AutoCAD, and months truly getting up to speed with shortcuts and productivity techniques. With ArchiCAD, however, we find that designers are usually doing floor plans and perspectives in the first day or two. A reason for this is that ArchiCAD handles so many of the basic setup procedures required to create architectural drawings (or drawings of any other kind) in AutoCAD. Here are some examples: ArchiCADs project structure is based on Virtual Building design. The ArchiCAD template is setup for a 2 story building with 4 preset exterior elevations. This template is designed to enable a new user to be able to get up and running from a new users perspective without having to set the system up initially. The template can be adjusted to cope with any number of stories, sections and elevations. Walls, layers, grid, units, and more are ready for you to start using. Insert doors and windows into walls and create zones to indicate spaces for programming. ArchiCAD generates coordinated sections, elevations, and 3D perspectives minutes after turning on the software.

Leveraging What You Already Know of CAD


It can be intimidating to take on a new BIM software package, particularly when you are well versed in a previous package. You have invested a great deal of time to learn the commands, techniques, shortcuts, and work-arounds needed to do architectural drawings in AutoCAD. You might even be considered the AutoCAD expert in your firm; colleagues come to you for help and advice. You worry that delving into a new area with ArchiCAD could undermine your authority or even your job. If you work on your own or in a small office, you may be worried that the transition may take up more time than you can afford. AutoCAD and ArchiCAD are both sophisticated software packages. It can be fun to go from an extensive but general CAD package like AutoCAD, to an advanced architecturally-intelligent (BIM) package like ArchiCAD. ArchiCAD is designed to automatically handle management of drawing scale configurations, and layer assignments. Thus giving the user more time to work on design and less time on mundane tasks such as making sure everything is on the correct layer, line weights are correct and annotation is the correct size. Yes, you can still customize ArchiCAD, such as creating your own layer names, but having it done automatically helps to get the computer out of the way of the design process. It is also fun for architectural designers to have the immediate visual feedback of 3D perspectives, sections, and elevations as they are designing, just as they had when designing with cardboard (only better). One of the common remarks we hear from users is that it enables you to concentrate on the important aspects of the design
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Introduction

The Purpose of This Book


All that architectural orientation is great, but... ... ArchiCAD looks different to the AutoCAD user. ... you may be wondering how to deal with unusual situations you run across in real building design. ... you may want to know how to leverage what you already know to achieve the same level of productivity you had with AutoCAD. The purpose of this book is to address the needs of more experienced AutoCAD users, and show you how to quickly transfer your AutoCAD skills to a similarly-advanced level with ArchiCAD. By experienced we assume you already know the fundamentals of AutoCAD such as what layers and blocks are; that you know a variety of AutoCAD tricks to produce floor plans quickly (mline or polyline-offset-trim); and other types of drawings the AEC firm needs to create. We show you equivalent techniques, as well as different approaches; we explain why these conceptually-different approaches may be better than merely adapting an AutoCAD trick. Over 80% of ArchiCAD users were AutoCAD users in the past, so you have a lot of company. We invite you to see what all those experienced CAD users have discovered in ArchiCAD.

Online Support
Go to http://www.archicadwiki.com for online ArchiCAD resources

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Chapter 1: AutoCAD User, Meet ArchiCAD

CHAPTER 1: AUTOCAD USER, MEET ARCHICAD


This chapter provides an overview of the similarities and differences between AutoCAD and ArchiCAD. Later chapters describe in greater detail how to work with ArchiCAD.

WHY USE ARCHICAD?


From the outset, ArchiCAD is a 3D Virtual Building modeler with architectural artificial intelligence. When you create a building in ArchiCAD, you dont do it by drafting and trimming lines as with AutoCAD. Instead, you virtually create the walls, insert doors and windows, and add other building elements. Each element has smart architectural parameters that you, the designer, can change at any time. ArchiCAD was designed with the architect in mind. The user interface makes it easy to manage floors (referred to as stories). Each story is kept visually separate from the other stories, yet objects (such as walls and furniture) are easily copied from story to story. The most basic element in ArchiCAD is the wall. Walls... Display differently in plan, section, elevation, and perspective views. Accommodate door and window openings that are similarly intelligent. Adjust to floors, roofs, and other walls automatically. Show poche (hatch) or texture, as appropriate. Other architectural elements, from stairs to detailed columns, are also intelligent 3D objects; they automatically interact and adjust to each other. Architectural elements are parametrically changeable by the designer.

Plan view with section view shown on top in ArchiCADMassaro House taken from the ArchiCAD BIM Experience Kit (available for free download at www.graphisoft.com) Creating a building project using the virtual reality building model approach has a lot of advantages over drafting in 2D CAD. This is because you are designing with Virtual Building elements. These elements are stored efficiently and can then be represented differently for all required architectural views. This removes any repetitions and ensures that any view created is always coordinated and up to date with the model, because it is the model. As with cardboard modeling, it is possible to see and fix potential design problems not apparent when plan smithing. ArchiCAD goes way beyond simulating cardboard, though, and produces photorealistic perspectives and walk-through animations to help your clients (and your colleagues) visualize your design ideas.

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Chapter 1: AutoCAD User, Meet ArchiCAD

Advantages to ArchiCAD
Many architects have switched to ArchiCAD and its Virtual Building environment, also referred to as BIM (Building Information Modeling). With ArchiCAD you have an automatically coordinated project, where plans, sections, elevations are all generated simultaneously. Advantages to ArchiCAD include...

Single Building Model


ArchiCAD allows you to model the entire building in a single drawing file. Benefits include instant visualization of any part of the entire building, coordinated documentation (sheets), precise materials list, and door and window schedules. The single building model is also known as the Virtual Building, a concept originally invented by Graphisoft. Enlarged plan view of kitchen

Space Planning
ArchiCAD helps early in the design process by allowing you to manipulate simple space planning areas. With the zone tool this allows users to show area information. It is also a 3D object that can double as a massing, which can be used to generate building components.

Generating Data
The modeled drawing elements and objects generate data that can be used for information about your potential building, such as building cost analysis, framing, energy analysis, and more.

Working as a Team
In offices where several designers need to work simultaneously on the same project, ArchiCAD allows each designer to sign into a project model as a teammate, reserve a building area and set of layers for themselves. See TeamWork on page 25. 3D camera view of kitchen

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Chapter 1: AutoCAD User, Meet ArchiCAD

Nomenclature: The Same, the Different, and the New


Many of ArchiCADs basic commands, such as editing (mirror, stretch, erase, rotate, fillet) and drawing aids (layer, grid), have the same name and work the same way conceptually as in AutoCAD. Even the x,y-grid and ortho angle are the same. ArchiCAD doesnt use commands per-se as you would in AutoCAD. ArchiCAD does not have a Command: prompt; instead, tools (or commands) are executed from cursor clicks or keyboard shortcuts. Therefore, you will need to quit the habit of hitting the enter key for tool execution, unless you are entering values, then the enter key is still used. Though the exact procedures may differ, there are a number of concepts that are essentially the same in both AutoCAD and ArchiCAD.

You can take any of those approaches in ArchiCAD. Particularly useful are fills or zones, which are color coded, stretch flexibly, and automatically display the current area then instantly turn into either 3D massing or walls. Slabs with cover fills can be used in this manner too. Slabs are more versatile and are 3D by nature. Editing Editing is easier, just select the tool of the object you want to edit. i.e. the same tool used to create the elements is used also to edit them. The user is presented with a Pet Palette used for editing elements on screen. The whole process is logical, quick and easy to pick up. Symbols and Symbol Libraries (Blocks) If you can avoid drawing/modeling something, and insert it in the drawing instantly (and accurately), it is faster yet. This is why the concept of symbol libraries is possibly the most important productivity concept in CAD software. AutoCAD provides a set of 2D & 3D blocks through its DesignCenter window (AdCenter command). ArchiCAD has a large collection of 3D symbols (Objects) sorted by several libraries. The primary library is in CSI format. These symbols are called GDL Objects. They are smart, 3D, and changeable. Each object can have parameters that change the objects size, material and display representation.

Concepts That Are Similar


Open, Save, and Plot do the same thing in ArchiCAD as in AutoCAD. Except in ArchiCAD you have the choice of Print and Plot. Print is intended for small format printers, and Plot is designed for large format plotters. Template Drawings In AutoCAD a good drawing template is very important for a successful CAD project. This template would be setup with office standards for layers, line weights, colors, dimension styles, etc. Although ArchiCAD comes with a default template it should give you an example of a project structure and aid you in creating your own. This is something that will evolve from project to project as your skills and requirements change. Sketch Layouts with Dimensions Some designers sketch their design on paper, and then start drafting walls with CAD. Alternatively, designers do 3D massing first. In AutoCAD, the preferred way to develop floor plans is to sketch lines (or zone areas), place dimensions, adjust them, start drawing walls and openings, and later add details.
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

These four cabinets are all the same GDL object, each object is set with their own unique parameters.

Chapter 1: AutoCAD User, Meet ArchiCAD

list that is typically created for AutoCAD is reduced. Yes the layers that are created should be structured and well designed. But because ArchiCAD is element based, there are more advanced and productive methods for the user to carry out commands that do not require the same level of reliance on layers. Plot Layout The same door object shown at 2 different scale settings, 1:500, 1:100 & 1:50 Layers Each element in the AutoCAD drawing is on a layer, the same as in ArchiCAD. Blocks, like ArchiCADs modules, can be placed on more than one layer. When you create a new layer in ArchiCAD, you give it a name, move elements to it, make it invisible (off), and lock it just like AutoCAD. Unlike AutoCAD, however, color, line weight and line type are not layer attributes in ArchiCAD. Though the procedures between AutoCADs paperspace and ArchiCADs Layout Map, laying out a sheet is essentially the same. You designate specific layers and the area, and then place that on a sheet at a specific scale.

The Layout Book is used to create plot layouts, which is similar to paperspace and the sheets component of Project Navigator in AutoCAD.

Viewing Commands
Layer Settings Manager Each architectural tool mode remembers its default layer, which is why the roofs are automatically on the roof layer, walls on the wall layer, and so on. But ArchiCAD is also flexible: you can set a default layer for each architectural element (or tool), and change it any time. It is important to note here that although ArchiCAD utilizes the concept of layers like AutoCAD, the need for a huge standard layer Zoom, Pan, Redraw, and Previous do the same thing as in AutoCAD. The middle mouse button works for panning and zooming too.

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Chapter 1: AutoCAD User, Meet ArchiCAD

Concepts That Are Different


There are some differences, which we highlight here. Look in Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference on page 64 for a more complete list. Drawing Commands To draw an arc, an ellipse or a circle you use the Arc/Circle tool. You draw a 360 degree arc when you create a circle. Editing Commands Some differences in editing commands include: Move in AutoCAD is called Drag by ArchiCAD, possibly to highlight the intuitive dynamic nature. The Copy command you are expecting is named Drag a Copy because the other Copy (in the Edit menu) is actually a Windows/Macintosh command where drawing elements are copied to the Clipboard for pasting into other programs. Array in AutoCAD is called Multiply, under which you find options for circular, rectangular, 3D, and linear arrays. This difference makes sense, because multiply would be more intuitive to CAD neophytes. See Multiply (Array) on page 26. Merge in ArchiCAD. It is used to combine drawings, import the equivalent of blocks, overlay scan images, and more. Offset shows up as an option when you use the mouse to click+hold the node (grip) of certain objects, such as slabs, fills, meshes, and roofs. See Offset & Repetitive Offset on page 27. Trim is a Ctrl+click, although there are other types of trim. Extend is a Ctrl+click, when the toolbar is set to the appropriate tool. You can find more details about these commands in Chapter 4: Editing with ArchiCAD on page 26.

Viewing Commands Changes from AutoCAD include: Zoom Extents is Fit to Window in ArchiCAD, although it is easier to use the little magnifying glass icons at the bottom of each window. Regen is known as Rebuild, but its not quite the same. If you are looking for how to get those 3D axonometric and perspective views, they are found under View | 3D View Mode | 3D Projection Settings. Move the little camera around the plan for axes. Some of the shortcuts listed above are meant for experts; beginners will find it easier to select commands from the menu bar. See 3D Viewing on page 45.

Concepts That Are New


Since ArchiCAD is dedicated to architectural design, it contains several new concepts not found in the base AutoCAD package. The Fundamental Difference The primary difference from AutoCAD is ArchiCADs single building model, sometimes called the Virtual Building. This is where the designer builds everything out of 3D elements, instead of drafting and trimming lines. And 2D drawings, such as plans, sections, elevations and preliminary details, are extracted from the comprehensive 3D model. Yes, you can just draft lines with ArchiCAD, when needed. You would, however, miss the productivity gain if you were to adapt AutoCADs line/offset technique to create walls in architectural floor plans. Even if you are not at all interested in 3D visualization, you still want to create 3D models as much as possible to obtain the benefit of coordinated elevations/sections, which reflect changes in all documents automatically. The basic working environment of ArchiCADs user interface consists of three main windows:

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Floor Plan Window uses floor plan symbols, and is not the same as a horizontal cut of the 3D model. Section Window & Elevation Window shows vertical and horizontal cuts through the 3D model. 3D Window shows the 3D model in perspective and parallel views. Sections and Elevations A major benefit of the single building model approach is that all section and elevation drawings are simply a by-product; there is no need to draft them from scratch. If the design changes, the section and elevation drawings update automatically.

covered up by walls or other elements. It is possible however to switch on the cover fill option for a slab object and have it represented with a fill (hatch pattern).

Elevation view of the Massaro House generated by ArchiCAD. You can add more detail, notes, elevation marks, and detail keys to the sections and elevations. These additions turn the schematic design drawings to proper construction documents. Stories and Floor Slabs Buildings with multiple floors are organized by Stories in ArchiCAD. All the stories in your building can reside in the same model (project file). Floor heights are controlled in the story settings. Stories can be thought of as a sub-layer or visibility display mode: walls on a second story can be on the same layer as walls on the first story, but you see only what is appropriate to each story. It is possible to toggle the visibility of elements and also coordinate elements between different orthographic views with the Trace & Reference feature. (View | Palettes | Trace & Reference) One facet of creating a 3D Virtual Building is that you need to add floor slabs. Even though floor slabs are not evident in floor plan drawings, they are integral to the Virtual Building model. By default the floor slabs outline is all that displays, but the outline is normally

The Floor Plan window shows the traditional 2D view of the drawing. Parametric GDL Objects In ArchiCAD, objects represent furniture, lighting, and building elements, such as windows, doors, columns, and stairs. Nearly all objects are 3D. It is fundamental to ArchiCAD that objects are changeable (through parameters). With changeable parameters, a single object takes the place of dozens of AutoCADs fixed blocks. For example, a bookcase can have a different number of shelves and materials. A door can have wide varieties of side lights, paneling, and handle hardware. Objects are written in a high level (i.e. simple to understand and learn) programming language called Geometric Description Language or GDL for short. ArchiCAD comes with a tutorial on how to write GDL. See Tutorial #4: Making a Custom Object on page 50.

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Chapter 1: AutoCAD User, Meet ArchiCAD

GDL uses parametric to generate variations on a single object, such as the interior door shown here.

How Far to Go with 3D


A philosophical issue with all architectural CAD software using 3D Virtual Building model approach is: How far should you take the 3D modeling?

Theoretically, when you model every single piece in the building, then even the smallest details coordinate automatically. Such a detailed model is, however, beyond reason, because there are hundreds of thousands of parts in even small building projects. So, compromises are necessary... It is usual to model floor slabs as monolithic 1-foot thick slabs regardless of the detail of their actual construction. Walls and roofs can show poche (hatches) to depict the different materials schematically. We build them in ArchiCAD as single elements. In details & section views, we usually add the required detail through the conventional 2D drafting method. ArchiCAD uses its Virtual Trace& Reference function to ensure that changes made to the main model are picked up on the Sections, Elevations and Details and documentation is kept coordinated. Some firms even include crown moldings, and use 3D details for wall details, rather than add such detail later in 2D. One school of thought is to model only what you would see in your predominant floor plan scale such as 1:50 or 1:100. The growing libraries of 3D GDL objects, such as those at www.objectsonline.com & www.archicadwiki.com encourage designers to go further with the Virtual Building.

A sampling of GDL objects for sale at the Objects Online Web site.

This photomontage shows a 3D building in wireframe (at left), hidden-line (top), and fully rendered (at right). ArchiCAD model courtesy of Studios Architecture, www.studiosarch.com.
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ARCHICAD AS A SUPPLEMENT IN THE AUTOCAD FIRM


While ArchiCAD is used as the sole CAD software in firms, it is a good choice as a supplemental software for 3D visualization in offices that must use AutoCAD. You can transfer 2D AutoCAD plans to ArchiCAD as guidelines, which create architectural models faster than any other technique. An advantage for interior designers and architects is that lights, textures, and materials chosen for walls and other elements are retained for the integral photo rendering and for export to super-photorealistic software. In some firms, ArchiCAD supplements AutoCAD for facilities management, space planning, and cost analysis, because it so easily keeps track of parametric objects. The smart DWG/DXF export-import function allows you to view DWG files like xrefs in ArchiCAD drawings.

Transitioning from AutoCAD to ArchiCAD


The best approach to transitioning is to finish existing projects in AutoCAD, but then start new projects in ArchiCAD. We recommend against attempting back-and-forth file transfers between CAD packages mid-project. Some offices continue to detail drawings and finish 2D construction documents with AutoCAD, while ramping up to speed with ArchiCAD. This, however, fails to utilize some of ArchiCADs great control over line weights, overshoots, and fonts that improves the look of your construction documents. More importantly as soon as you leave the ArchiCAD environment you have lost the all important coordination benefit of using ArchiCAD.

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Chapter 2: Workflow

CHAPTER 2: WORKFLOW
PROJECT WORKFLOW
Everything you draw or model in ArchiCAD starts in the Project Map. Layer control and other graphical display settings are saved to views in the View Map. Views are placed in the Layout Map on to Layouts (sheets). These layouts can be batch processed to file or to a printer via the Publisher. Understanding this workflow is very important for all members of an ArchiCAD project team. Otherwise you can be faced with confusion and inconsistent graphic quality in your construction documents.

Project Map
All project drawing information is accessible in the project map. All graphical drawing elements are displayed per the current settings.

combinations and model display options are assigned to drawing views.

Layout Map
The Layout Book is where the sheets are created and managed. The Masters (title blocks) are kept and managed here too.

View Map
The View Map is where the saved drawing views are kept. All graphical display settings are saved to a view with pre-set display configurations. this is where the graphic behavior is set. Pen sets, layer
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Publisher
The Publisher is used to print, plot and export files. This is where the batch printing and batch file conversion is performed. Do your setup and configuration in the Organizer palette. The setup tools available in the Organizer palette are arranged better for Publisher set setup as compared to the Navigator palette. Once a couple of projects have been completed in ArchiCAD the template can be customized so that new projects benefit from the project organization and defined views. Essentially this means that users can spend their time modelling and drafting without having to worry about generating documentation. This will automatically be taken car of with the template. See Batch Output with the Publisher on page 62.

Organizer Palette displaying the View Map in the left pane and the Layout Map in the right pane

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Chapter 3: ArchiCAD Methods

CHAPTER 3: ARCHICAD METHODS


Opening ArchiCAD for the first time reveals a new world for the designer experienced with AutoCAD. Although ArchiCAD is now established in the Windows environment, it still shows its Macintosh roots, such as the Toolbox topped by the Mac-like Arrow tool. ArchiCADs noun-verb approach may seem backwards to some AutoCAD users. Rest assured, you will find the different interface makes a lot of sense.

TOURING THE ARCHICAD USER INTERFACE


Upon starting ArchiCAD, you see a number of palettes (toolbars) and windows, including a large window in which to draw the floorplan. This window is surrounded by toolbars for placing objects, observing measurements, and setting options. The palette called the Toolbox, has icons for drawing walls, windows, doors, floor slabs, and so on. (The Toolbox is also in toolbar form). It is topped by the Arrow tool and dotted rectangle Marquee selection tools. ArchiCAD is unique from AutoCAD in that one tool of this toolbar must be selected, because this determines the mode of the CAD system. ArchiCADs Work Environment settings (Options | Work Environment) aid in control over the user interface. This includes the ability to create custom toolbars and keyboard shortcuts. As first required by Apple (and then Microsoft) user interface guidelines, the menu bar starts with File and Edit, followed by program-specific options, and then Window view controls and Help. Using the Open, Save, Exit commands, printing, undoing, and finding basic editing commands are obvious to the experienced CAD user. The ArchiCAD user interface changes depending on the mode of the primary toolbar, which is not what AutoCAD users are used to. The change in ArchiCADs user interface is due to the conceptual approach of building a project with architectural components, as opposed to 2D CAD drafting.
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Overview of the User Interface


Some parts of the ArchiCAD user interface should be familiar to you, such as the title bar, the menu bar, and the toolbar. As in AutoCAD, you can customize a toolbar by adding and removing commands. Other aspects of the user interface are somewhat different. ArchiCADs status bar displays only command prompts, and the amount of free virtual memory and disk space (Window | Palettes | Statusbar). Other information found on AutoCADs status bar can be found on ArchiCADs Coordinate Box and Control Box palettes (Window | Palettes). ArchiCADs grid consists of gray lines by default, instead of the black dots found in AutoCAD. You can set the grid to any color you want (in ArchiCAD). Another minor difference is that ArchiCAD actually marks the origin (0,0) using a small x. AutoCAD displays the origin with its UCS icon.

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A more significant difference is that ArchiCAD displays each view in its own window one window is for displaying the floor plan, another display the 3D view, while others display sections, elevations, details, schedules and worksheets. Tip: To get help for buttons and other user interface elements, right-click the item, then click on whats This... ArchiCAD display the full help topic.

3D Navigation The 3D drawing window has navigation buttons at the bottom. To open the 3D drawing window press the F5 keyboard button, the 3D Window button on the 3D Navigation toolbar, or from the 3D section under the Navigator palette under Project Map.

Palettes
Palettes are like sophisticated toolbars. They are similar to Tool Palettes in AutoCAD but more dynamic. Toolbox The Toolbox contains all of ArchiCADs selection and drawing tools (commands). The top two buttons are the Arrow and Marquee selection tools. The remaining buttons include drawing and annotation tools. The Wall tool is the default. Double-click a button to display its Default Settings (Properties) dialog box. Info Box The Info Box provides information about the current tool, such as construction method, fill (hatch), thickness, and layer name. The content of this palette changes, depending on which tool has been selected from the Toolbox. Coordinates Palette The Coordinates Palette displays information about the x, y, z-coordinates, relative distance, angle, and grid modes. (Grid modes can also be controlled with the Standard toolbar) This palette is not on by default. Go to Window | Palettes | Coordinates Control Box Palette The Control Box Palette provides tools for controlling the placement of elements. It lets you specify the relative construction methods including the offset tool, snap points, group mode, and so on. (These controls are also available on the Standard toolbar). This palette is not on by default. Go to Window | Palettes | Control Box.

3D Drawing Window Status Report The Status Report palette is displayed only when ArchiCAD reports an error, such as a missing library or incomplete .dwg translation.

Other Elements
Other user interface elements include: Toolbars These are just like toolbars in AutoCAD. You can create your own custom toolbars using any existing ArchiCAD tools.
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Pet Palettes The Pet Palette is an automatic element specific palette that pops up during element editing. It allows the user to execute different edit commands easily without looking away from the task at hand (heads up design). It shows both tools specific to the particular task and the default transformation commands such as move, rotate, etc.

options can be found under Options | Work Environment |Tracker and Coordinate Input.

Tracker toggle button on the Standard toolbar Window Controls At the bottom of each drawing view window is a set of controls that specify the drawing scale and zoom percentage. These button controls let you zoom, pan and specify the scale factor. See images in this chapter under 3D Navigation on page 18.

The Pet Palette displayed during the selection a slab edge

Typing Commands vs. Modal Operations


The Pet Palette displayed during the selection a node on a fill ArchiCAD contrasts with AutoCAD, where all tools apply the selected objects in the same way. When you select a tool from ArchiCADs Toolbox, such as the Wall or Windows tool, the palettes (toolbars) change to options appropriate for that tool. The illustration shows the Info Box palette changing from Wall mode to Window mode.

The Pet Palette displayed during the selection of a node on an object (GDL) Top line icons represent commands specific to edge or point selection such as stretch, fillet, offset etc. Commands on the bottom line are common transformation such as move, rotate, mirror, etc. These are the commands found in the grip editing modes in AutoCAD. Configuration options for Pet Palettes can be found under Options | Work Environment | Dialog Boxes and Palettes. The Tracker Similar to the Coordinate Box, the Tracker is a small palette that displays coordinate information. It follows the cursor movement and allows for heads up coordinate input. Toggle the Tracker on and off via the Standard toolbar. Configuration

When the Wall tool is selected, the Info Box displays a different set of information than when another tool, such as Window, is selected.

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Mouse click actions (such as Shift+click, Spacebar+click, and right click) also change, depending on the tool selected. Even the Edit | Select All command becomes more specific, such as selecting all walls when the wall tool is in use or all slabs when the slab tool is in use.

Layers
In AutoCAD, as you enter commands to place lines, arcs, and 3D objects, the objects take on the attributes of the current layer. Unless AutoCAD is programmed otherwise, you change layers manually. When ArchiCAD places an object, all settings color, layer, story, linetype, heights, and so on are specific to the currently-selected tool. Choosing a different tool, such as switching from the Wall tool to the Slab tool, automatically switches the active layer. Keep this in mind if you are creating your own templates with your own layers. See Layers & Layer Combinations on page 24.

Changing Objects
A significant advantage to ArchiCADs modal approach is the ability instantly to change one type of object to another. For example: 1 Draw a rough, four-sided shape with the Line tool. 2 Select the Fill tool, and then Spacebar+click the center of the shape to add fill automatically. Each time you hold down the Shift key and click the rectangle, objects are added or changed with the Magic Wand, depending on the currently-selected tool. 3 Select the Slab tool, and then Spacebar+click the center of the shape. Notice the line color changes; it is a slab (has thickness). 4 Select the Wall tool, and again Spacebar+click the shape. Notice the walls surrounding the shape. Switch to the 3D windows (Window | 3D Window) to see the slab and walls in three dimensions. The parameters of the new shape (color, height, layer, wall thickness, and so on) are whatever is set for each tool at the moment you use the Space+click. There is no need to change the thickness setting, for example, as there is in AutoCAD.

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Chapter 3: ArchiCAD Methods

Setting Properties
To adjust the settings of any ArchiCAD tool, double-click (or press the left-cursor arrow) the tools icon. The tools Settings dialog box appears. To change the parameters of an object already drawn, first select it, and then double-click the tool that created it: Slab tool for floor slabs, Wall tool for walls, and so on.

In addition, ArchiCAD has editing operations where you issue no command; this is similar to AutoCADs grip-based editing. For example, moving or stretching requires that you just select an object, then drag it to its new location or size. As in AutoCAD, you can also select an object, then right-click, and choose an option from the shortcut menu.

Selecting Objects
Objects are selected with the Arrow tool. Here ArchiCAD is the same as AutoCAD: you must click the lines making up an object. For example, click on one of the four lines making up a rectangle, and not in the middle. In AutoCAD, you select more than one object by clicking them. In ArchiCAD, you select additional elements by employing Shift+click. In AutoCAD, you hold down the Ctrl key to cycle through overlapping objects. When several objects overlap, such as a wall over a floor slab, ArchiCAD however, tries to select objects similar to the current tool type. When different types of objects are overlaid, ArchiCAD uses preselection to show the user what will be selected if the user clicks. This is activated initially if you hold down the shift key when in a tool or automatically on the arrow tool. If there is more than one element

Wall Default Settings dialog box.

Noun-Verb Editing
For its first eleven releases, AutoCAD required that you start an editing command, and then select objects to be edited. You enter a command (the verb) such as Move or Erase, and then select the objects (the nouns) to move or erase. Then, AutoCAD added noun-verb editing, where you select the objects first, and then select the editing command. ArchiCAD has noun-verb editing only: you always select an object first, and then specify how to change it.

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overlaid then the element information box shows a list of the multiple elements. If there are elements that overlap you can cycle through them. Click on one element, then tap the Tab key. The Element Information palette can be used to display information on selected elements, similar to the List command in AutoCAD (Window | Palettes | Element Information.) When objects are selected in AutoCAD, they are shown in dashed lines. In ArchiCAD, the selected elements display a fill pattern highlight and black dots at corners (or circles if grouped) called nodes. Nodes are similar to AutoCADs grips.

pressed multiple times, it will return you back to the Arrow tool. This is dependant on where the user was when first pressed (right click menu, selection, tool, Arrow). The Magic Wand is a selection method similar to the pick points selection option in the AutoCAD Hatch command. You can use it with the fill tool or when you create zones. Hold down the space bar and left click inside the area you wish to fill. See Magic Wand on page 71.

Drawing by Mousing
Drawing in ArchiCAD is similar to drawing in AutoCAD. In both, you judge distances by using coordinate readouts. In AutoCAD, you peer at the status bar; in ArchiCAD, at the Coordinates palette and the Tracker. See The Tracker on page 19. In both AutoCAD and ArchiCAD, you draw lines, walls, and so on, either by using the mouse, or by entering exact x,y,z-coordinates, distances, and angles. Similar to AutoCADs polar tracking, ArchiCAD has its Guide Lines that aid in drawing at specific angles in real time. To help with drawing, ArchiCAD features two grids, instead of AutoCADs one. One grid is a multiple of the other, such as100mm" and 1000mm.

Elements selected in ArchiCAD with the Arrow tool show nodes (grips). Tip: When objects are selected in ArchiCAD, pressing the F5 key will display only the selected objects in 3D view. This makes it easy and fast to check on specific details. ArchiCADs use of implied windowing is similar to that of AutoCAD: click in a blank area, and then drag over the objects with the arrow tool. The functionality is exactly the same, only the user has to preset the window method from the Info Box. Select either the partial elements button for a crossing window and the entire elements button for a regular window.

Entering Coordinates
To specify distances, use Cartesian coordinates (x,y) by typing X and a number, and then Y and a number. Notice that the appropriate field in the Coordinates palette is highlighted. Angles in ArchiCAD are the same as in AutoCAD: right is 0 degrees, up is 90, left is 180, and so on. The numbers are converted to the current units feet-inches in the USA, meters-cm-mm everywhere else.

The user can also define a window polygon or crossing polygon and also rectangle at angle in both modes. Fence mode is the only mode that ArchiCAD does not have. In AutoCAD, you can press the Esc key to unselect everything. In ArchiCAD, you can click in any white space of your drawing or press the Esc key to unselect everything or cancel the command. But the Esc key in ArchiCAD does more than just cancel the command. If

Relative & Cartesian Coordinates


Just like AutoCAD, ArchiCAD recognizes relative coordinates and cartesian coordinates. Cartesian coordinates are X and Y and Polar coordinates are defined by angle and distance. The other part that relates
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to both of these items is absolute and relative coordinates. Absolute is taken from the 0,0 origin and relative takes the point from the last position. To create a wall of a specific length and angle in ArchiCAD with the relative method: 1 Select the Wall tool 2 Click anywhere in your drawing to define the first point of the wall 3 Press R on the keyboard (short for relative distance), and then type a number 4 Press A (short for angle), and then type the angle. This step can skipped if the Guide Lines feature is on. See Drawing by Mousing on page 22. 5 Press the Enter key This is similar to relative units in AutoCAD. Check relative coordinates in the Tracker or triangle buttons in the coordinate box to see if they relate to either absolute or relative coordinates. See The Tracker on page 19.

Creating Modules and Symbols


An effective technique to increasing productivity in any CAD system is using a library of pre-drawn objects. There are some counterparts in ArchiCAD to AutoCADs blocks, block library (DesignCenter), and the WBlock, Explode, and Xref commands. For example, WBlock (a block written to disk) is similar in the way they are used to ArchiCADs GDL object. Although GDL objects are actually referenced into drawings, not embedded like blocks. ArchiCAD employs a variety of techniques and methods for working with symbols (blocks) more than just different command names. Some methods of working with symbols in ArchiCAD have no direct correlation with AutoCAD. For example, you insert a block or xref to create an overlaid lighting plan in AutoCAD; in ArchiCAD, however, you use Layer Combinations plus model view options to control the display representation of objects such as wall fills on plans.

Group (Block)
When a block is created in AutoCAD, it is internal to the drawing; it is not saved to an external file until you use the WBlock command. For the most part, AutoCAD users employ blocks to copy repeated items in the drawing efficiently. For this purpose, the Block command is probably most analogous to ArchiCADs Group command. The Explode command in AutoCAD and UnGroup in ArchiCAD do the same thing in this instance. In AutoCAD, blocks are instanced: only the x, y, z location is recorded, and a phantom is displayed and plotted; this makes blocks very memory and file-space efficient. A good feature of blocks is that if you redefine them, all instances automatically change. Blocks can have attributes added, data that can be extracted and processed. A block can be inserted from an external source, such as from a block library, a common folder, or even another entire drawing. In all these cases, AutoCAD blocks are analogous to ArchiCAD GDL objects.

Object Snaps
In AutoCAD, you turn on and off object snap modes. In ArchiCAD, object snaps are always on. Move the cursor near the end of a wall, for example, and notice the checkmark. It indicates an object snap point. Click the checkmark, and the cursor snaps to that point. A pencil icon with a line through it is the equivalent of AutoCADs NEARest object snap. Midpoints of lines/walls and centers/quadrants of circles appear automatically as little marker lines when you linger near the desired point. The marker lines can be snapped to, and disappear after about four seconds. To change to other or multiple snap points, select the Special Snap Points icon in the Control Box palette or on the Standard toolbar. This function behaves in the same way as the Divide and Measure commands in AutoCAD. The advantage here is that they are only temporary and do not have to be added to the model.

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Chapter 3: ArchiCAD Methods

GDL Object (WBlock)


To create a block external to AutoCAD, you save the block with the WBlock command, and then choose a folder in which to store it. Similarly, in ArchiCAD, you can take anything you have drawn or modeled, and save it as a module or a GDL object to a folder. Modules can be merged or hotlinked into your project and GDL objects are inserted like blocks. Create a GDL object from selected elements, File | Libraries and Objects | Save Selection as... Create a module from selected elements, File | External Content | Save Selection as Module... GDL objects have parameters that can be modified in the Object Settings dialog before they are placed. There are plenty of objects included in the ArchiCAD library. These objects are organized into several libraries, including the CSIs (Construction Specifications Institute) 16-division format (excluding the default international version of ArchiCAD). Objects include furniture, steel web joists, to items such as entire dining room layouts. Because the library is so extensive, many design offices rarely save custom library parts. Instead, they modify and adapt existing objects in the ArchiCAD library. It is possible to design GDL objects with a programming language called GDL, short for Geometric Description Language. Alternatives include dynamic GDL object creators, such as ArchiForma, and GDL ToolBox. GDL is included with your ArchiCAD license, so that you can create parametrically changeable custom elements. See Tutorial #4: Making a Custom Object on page 50.

Layer Combinations Layer combinations are similar to AutoCADs saved layer states, and are integral to the overall project documentation. Every view in the View Map should have a specific layer combination assigned.

Model View Options


Similar to Autodesk Architectural Desktops display representations, Model View Options control the global display of door objects, fill patterns and zones. Just like with layer combinations, model view options should be assigned to every view in the View Map. Document | Set Model View | Model View Options...

Place External Drawing (Image)


Place External Drawing works similar to an Xref because the external drawing is a reference and not embedded into the project. This feature works with a multitude of different image file formats such as .BMP, .JPG & .GIF, as well as CAD formats .DWG, .DGN & DXF. For example: You can place a site contour drawing in the background, and then trace on top of it. File | External Content | Place External Drawing.

Merge
The Merge feature is similar to inserting an exploded block, because the merged file becomes part of your project model in an editable state. File formats that can be merged include ArchiCAD projects, .DWG, DXF, .PLT, .WMF and more.

Xrefs
ArchiCAD has two familiar AutoCAD-like external reference commands; Attach Xref and Xref Manager. They are located under File | External Content. This functionality makes it easy to integrate ArchiCAD in offices previously using AutoCAD. The Xref Manager in ArchiCAD functions very much like the Xref Manager in AutoCAD. You can detach, reload, unload or bind and there is an attach & overlay option.

Layers & Layer Combinations


The Layers Settings window is very similar to AutoCADs layer manager; Document | Layers | Layer Settings (or just Ctrl+L). You can turn off (hide), lock layers and manage layer combinations.

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TeamWork
Teamwork is the method in which project model files are shared between multiple users and any one time. Users can sign-in to a project model and reserve only the portions of the building or documentation that he or she needs to work on. There are 5 different teamwork user types. Each one possesses its own unique permission levels and capabilities. Here is a short list... Teammate Team Leader Mark-Up View Only Administrator See Appendix C: Teamwork Roles & Permissions on page 73 for detailed role descriptions.

Hotlinked Modules
When working on segments of a building project, the segments tend to be updated continually. The best way to ensure you are working with the latest version of the designs is to insert the drawings in ArchiCAD as hotlinked modules. Unlike AutoCADs xrefs, modules in ArchiCAD interact with elements in the drawing (walls clean up, patterns blend, and so on). In a manner similar to the xref, a hotlinked module updates when changes are saved in the source module. Hotlinked modules can be .mod, .pln, or .plp files.

Hotlink Manager

Stories
Many offices use AutoCADs xrefs to draw and manage the different floors of a multi-story building. In ArchiCAD, rather than using either xrefs or layer sets, building stories are organized in the Project Map with the Navigator palette (and the Organizer palette). In Chapter 5: ArchiCAD Tutorials on page 29, you learn to work through several tutorials, learning these tools and terminology.

Navigator Palette
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Chapter 4: Editing with ArchiCAD

CHAPTER 4: EDITING WITH ARCHICAD


All of ArchiCADs basic editing commands (involving moving, copying, mirroring, stretching, erasing, rotating, filleting, and chamfering) work pretty much as in AutoCAD. Keep in mind that you select the elements first, and then apply the editing command. See Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference on page 64 for a list of AutoCAD commands, their ArchiCAD counterparts and keyboard shortcuts. Tip: You will read references to the pet palette. The Pet Pallet appears in ArchiCAD when editing either a node or edge. The closet thing to an AutoCAD equivalent would be grip editing. See Pet Palettes on page 19.

Drag Multiple Copy (Copy Multiple)


Select the elements, keyboard shortcut: Ctrl+D, Ctrl+Alt, or... Select the elements, from the Edit menu, select Move, Drag Multiple Copy, or... Select elements, click & hold, drag them and keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Alt.

Multiply (Array)
The Multiply menu has options for circular (polar) arrays or column-row (rectangular) arrays. Select the elements, keyboard shortcut: Ctrl+U, or... Select the elements, from the Edit menu, select Move | Multiply, or... Select the elements, click & hold to initiate pet palette, click Multiply button.

Pet Palette It was christened the Pet Palette after users noticed it followed the cursor around like a puppy. The palette provides common editing options, including move, offset, and fillet of corners. Its behavior can be controlled via the Work Environment Settings under the Options menu.

Resize (Scale)
Select the elements, keyboard shortcut: Ctrl+K, or... Select the elements. From the Edit menu, select Reshape | Resize, or... Select elements. Click & hold to initiate pet palette, click Resize button. The Resize dialog box will appear. Enter your resize ratio (scale factor) or click the Define graphically button to resize by clicking points on the screen (much like the AutoCAD default). Note that you can resize floor slabs, roofs, meshes, fills, and polygon walls using the pet palette.

Drag (Move)
Select the elements, keyboard shortcut: Ctrl+D, or... Select the elements, from the Edit menu, select Move, Drag, or... Select elements, click & hold, and drag them. Once the object is selected, you can drag the object from the node point. You just need to make sure that the bottom move icon in the pet pallet is selected. By default the pet pallet will always show the last used commands.

Drag a Copy (Copy)


Select the elements, keyboard shortcut: Ctrl+D, Ctrl, or... Select the elements. From the Edit menu, select Move, Drag a Copy, or... Select elements, click & hold, drag them and tap Ctrl.

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Rotate
Rotating in ArchiCAD is slightly different than AutoCAD. Select the elements, keyboard shortcut: Ctrl+E, or... Select the elements, from the Edit menu, select Move, Rotate, or... Select elements, click & hold, click the Rotate button from pet palette. Click to define the rotation centerpoint Click away from the center point to define the arc start point Complete the rotation arc (rotate with cursor on screen).

Fillet and Chamfer


To apply a fillet or a chamfer to a corner in ArchiCAD, look under Edit | Reshape | Fillet/Chamfer. To fillet a corner with a zero radius, look under Edit | Reshape | Intersect. Note that you can also fillet floor slabs, roofs, meshes, fills, and polygon-walls using the pet palette. In all cases, select the pair of lines first, and the command retains the two longer line segments. To trim between shorter line segments, instead use the click-to-trim shortcut: Ctrl+click.

Polylines
The ArchiCAD Polyline is very similar to AutoCADs except ArchiCAD does not allow you to assign a line width. Click on the Polyline button from the tool box palette. Start the Polyline from any point. The pet palette will pop-up, click the straight or arc segment buttons after each click to create your polyline.

Mirror
Select the elements, keyboard shortcut: Ctrl+M, or... Select the elements. From the Edit menu, select Move, Mirror, or... Select elements. Click & hold, click the Mirror button from pet palette.

Click to Trim (Trim)


Similar to AutoCADs Trim command, but without the need to select a cutting boundary. Hold the Ctrl key down. The Scissors cursor will display while you hold the Ctrl key down, then click the portion of the element you wish to trim away. Some objects (such as continuous lines, arcs, and walls) are grouped together automatically when you create them. To trim them, you must first ungroup them via Edit | Grouping | Ungroup.

Offset & Repetitive Offset


The Offset tool is similar to the Offset command in AutoCAD. Use the Control Box palette (Window | Palettes | Control Box). Note: The element type you offset needs to be the currently active tool. 1 Choose the tool that matches the element you are offsetting 2 Click the Offset or Repetitive Offset button from the Control Box palette. 3 Click the Magic Wand button from the Control Box palette 4 Click on the element to be offset and move your cursor to the side you want to copy.

Adjust (Extend)
1 Select the elements you wish to adjust. 2 Select the Edit | Reshape | Adjust 3 Draw a line segment, or click an existing line, wall, polygon edge or arc/circle. The endpoints of the selected walls and lines will be adjusted (lengthened or shortened) to meet the drawn or clicked line or curve. Only those elements will be affected that intersect (or would intersect) with the chosen line/arc/edge.

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5 Type in a specific distance or click where you want your copy.

Offset tool shown offsetting a wall. Notice the wall tool is selected in the tool box The Repetitive Offset feature allows you to create multiple offset copies by clicking different points on the drawing or typing in distances. This is an improvement over AutoCAD, because AutoCAD requires you to finish the command before you can specify a new distance.

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Chapter 5: ArchiCAD Tutorials

CHAPTER 5: ARCHICAD TUTORIALS


This chapter gives you a chance to gain some hands-on experience with ArchiCAD, by working through several tutorials that show you the fundamental procedures for designing a building: creating floor plans, working with multi-floor buildings, creating sections and elevations, working with plot layouts and multi-scale drawing sheets. 2 If the Start ArchiCAD dialog box appears, select the following: Create a New Project. Use a Template (ArchiCAD 12 Template.tpl) Set up Work Environment, Use: Standard Profile 12 And then click New.

STARTING ARCHICAD
Before starting ArchiCAD, ensure the hardware key is installed on your computers parallel or USB port, depending on the style of key. ArchiCAD will not run without the hardware key installed. On the positive side, the key allows you to install ArchiCAD on more than one computer, such as on a desktop and notebook. When travelling, simply move the hardware lock from the desktop to the notebook. 1 To start ArchiCAD, double-click its icon on the desktop. As an alternative, click the Start button on the Windows taskbar, and then select All Programs | Graphisoft | ArchiCAD 12| ArchiCAD 12. Tip: The very first time you start ArchiCAD, you may notice that it seems to take a long time to launch. This delay occurs only on the first occasion: starting ArchiCAD subsequently goes much faster.

3 For tutorial #1, we assume you are starting a new ArchiCAD drawing from scratch with the ArchiCAD 12 Template.
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TUTORIAL #1: CREATING A FLOORPLAN


In this tutorial, you create a floorplan by working through these four stages: Stage 1: Preparing the drawing. Stage 2: Placing walls. Stage 3: Inserting windows, doors, and a floor slab. Stage 4: Creating dimensions.Stage 5: Adding the roof and additional floors.

4 - From the palette under Structure, click on the cut fill box to the right 5 - Select 25%. Tip: To undo a drawing or an editing command, select Edit | Undo from the menu bar. Like AutoCAD, ArchiCAD can undo more than one step back.

Preparing the Drawing


To prepare the drawing for the floor plan, first set several options: 1 ArchiCAD has three grid settings, a main grid (larger) an auxilary grid based from the main grid (smaller) and a snap grid. The larger grid should start out at 1000mm, the smaller grid at 100mm. The larger grid makes it easy to rough out a building quickly (with dimensions like 30m x 10m, and so on); switching to the smaller grid makes it easier to place doors, windows, and furniture. 2 Turn on the grid, as follows: In the Coordinates palette, click+hold the Grid/Snap button. From the three options, select the larger grid.

You can always turn off the snap grid temporarily even while drawing and can modify both grids via View | Grid Options | Grids & Background... 3 Set the parameters for drawing the exterior walls, as follows: (see numbered steps image below also). 1 - In the Toolbox, click the Wall tool. 2 - In the Info Box palette, click+hold the Geometry Methods button (fourth from the left). Select the retangular walls button. 3 - Still in the Info Box palette, click on the large button labeled Floor Plan and Section This button displays a flyout palette that lets you configure the hatching for filling walls and other display behavior.

Notice that the walls will be placed on the Structural - Bearing layer. Tip: It is easier to work with generic walls, such as these 25% filled, and specify a nominal width. Later, as the design becomes definitive, you select walls that made of specific materials; ArchiCAD then adjusts the correct wall width automatically. 4 Designers use the fill tool as a space planning layout technique, before overlaying with walls. Select a fill for the area, as follows: Click the Fill tool (located in the lower half of the Toolbox). Click on pattern button, which is set to Foreground by default. This will display the fill pattern fly out palette. From the palette, select Wood. Notice that the fills will be placed on layer 2D Drafting General, per the fill tools default setting.

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Importing Xrefs You may want to xref a .dwg file for this exercise. The file could be of an existing building or site survey. Refer to How to Transfer 2D and 3D Files on page 54 for instructions on how to bring AutoCAD files into your ArchiCAD project.

Change the width from 300 to 100 Change the layer to A-WALL-EXTR Click OK.

Placing the Walls


Lets start placing the walls for a small building, we will start with the exterior perimeter. 1 To place the exterior walls, start in the lower left of the floorplan window labelled Untitled / 1. Story: Select the Wall tool from the Toolbox. Click the x (the origin) located near the lower-left corner of the window. Select the corner of the outline drawn in AutoCAD for the wall location. Click around the exterior perimeter using dimensions of 18000 wide by 10000 tall. Watch the R readout in the Coordinates palette. Since you selected the large grid, the distances jump in four-foot increments. When done, select the Arrow tool to cancel continuous wall drawing mode.

On the Info Box palette, change Geometry Methods from continuous to single walls. 3 Draw some interior walls to create several rooms.

The exterior walls are drawn as a continuous wall. 2 Before drawing the interior walls, double-click the Wall tool, and make these changes in the Wall Settings dialog box: Interior walls have a nominal width of four inches.

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Tips: To make the walls line up properly, you may need to switch the reference side of the wall in the Info Box palette. (The reference side of walls has the thicker black line.) Keep in mind that the reference line for one wall must meet the reference line of the adjacent wall. If the walls do not clean up automatically, it may be that you clicked too far away from the reference line of an adjacent wall for the auto-cleanup to work. To fix intersections, you can either: Stretch the walls to make them meet. To stretch a wall: Select the wall by clicking it with Arrow tool. Click+hold the end node on the reference line side of the wall (the other side moves the entire wall), and then drag toward the adjacent wall until the wall intersection icon appears. Trim or extend the wall. To trim a wall: Ungroup it with Edit | Grouping | Ungroup. Hold down the Ctrl key until you see the scissors cursor, which indicates ArchiCAD is in trim mode. Click the wall segment to remove. To extend a wall, select it. Ctrl+click the wall you want to extend it to (similar to the boundary selected in AutoCADs Extend command).

the mercedes cursor). When the cursor is over the walls reference line the mercedes will show bold. The mercedes cursor indicates where you can place any window or door. See Cursor Forms on page 71. Windows (and doors) must be placed in walls; do not place them in gaps between walls; that is, dont break the walls first. Notice that ArchiCAD cuts the right size of the opening automatically. Notice that the window opening appears, and that the cursor changes to the eyeball cursor. Click a spot outside of the building, so that the window faces the right direction.

Placing Windows
1 Before placing windows, double-click on the Windows tool icon. This will open the Window Default Settings dialog box. 2 In the Window Settings dialog box, select the window style you wish to place, and then click OK. Tip: As with walls, you do not have to make a final choice at this time, because you can [parametrically] change windows at any time. An empty opening of the approximate size will do at this stage. 3 Place the window as follows: Click the location in the wall where you wish to place the window. You should see an upside-down Y-shaped icon (called

Window Default Settings dialog

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The three steps for inserting a window. Tip: By default, windows and doors are placed relative to their centerpoint. To place them relative to the side jamb, change the Geometry Methods toggle in the Info palette. The jamb insertion requires an extra click to specify which side (of your first click) to place the window or door.

Placing Doors
The button for the Door tool is on the Tool Box palette. 1 Double-click the Door tool. 3 Click a location in the wall where you wish to place the door: Look for the mercedes icon, and then click. (a bold mercedes indicates the reference line side) When the eyeball icon appears, click one of the four quadrants (inside, outside, left, or right) to indicate the direction of the doors swing.

2 In the Door Settings dialog box, choose a door type. Notice the extensive library of interior and exterior doors of many standard sizes, swing types, materials, and styles all parametrically changeable. Click OK to close the dialog box.

The pick point determines the door swing in, out, left, or right.
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If you use the jamb setting (instead of centerpoint), you need to click a second time for the door position before selecting the swing.

Adding the Floor Slab


1 To create a floor slab, select the Slab tool from the Toolbox. The default setting is a 300mm wood slab, starting at elevation 0 and going down 300mm. 2 When the exterior walls enclose a definable space (think of AutoCADs closed polyline), you can apply the Magic Wand shortcut: Hold down the Spacebar. Select the outside wall edge. The entire floor is created automatically. Notice that slab edges are shown only by a gray line. In many circumstances, the line is precisely under the wall edge, which means that it can be difficult to see. You do, however, see the slab edge at door openings.

Inserting an Empty Opening


To open a wall without placing a door, you can use the Door tool. 1 In the Toolbox, double-click the Door tool. 2 In the Door Settings dialog box, select the Empty Opening button in the Preview and Positioning pane.

The edge of the slab can be seen in window and door openings. 3 Enter the width of the opening in the box next to the door width symbol. 4 Click OK. This creates the proper gap size in the 2D plan view; the 3D view, however, shows a header at 2100mm (which you can change). You can change the plain header to an arched opening, or even create indented niches in walls. Since not much of a slab is shown in plan, such an element is really only needed because of the whole 3D Virtual Building approach used by ArchiCAD. It is possible to add a cover fill to a slab to make it easy to identify. Select the slab Select the Floor Plan and Section button from the Info Box Check the box in the Cover Fill section (if un-checked) Uncheck the Use fill of surface material box (if un-checked)

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Click on the fill type box and select a fill pattern

Cover fill portion of the Floor Plan and Section palette Each slab can have separate settings for materials. To see different floor materials in different rooms in perspective renderings (such as tile in kitchen, and wood in dining rooms), you need to create a separate floor slab for each room. The floor slabs edge and bottom can have materials that differ from the top. Typically, ArchiCAD users run the floor slab under the walls (regardless of how the building is actually constructed), and set the same material for the floor slab edge as for the walls themselves. In renderings and perspectives, the line between walls and floor will then be invisible from the exterior. Cutting Holes in Slabs You need to cut holes in the slab to allow for stairs and balconies. This is done by selecting the existing slab, and then drawing the second slab; ArchiCAD removes the material of the second slab from the first, creating the hole. 1 Activate the Slab tool. 2 Select the slab. Because there could be many building elements overlaid (using the shift key changes the tool to selection mode indicated by cursor arrow rather than creation tool indicated by cursor cross) the element information will show which item would be selected using a pre-highlight if the user clicks. If at anytime there are multiple objects that are overlaid, the element information shows the item that it would select and then also indicates to the user that there are multiple items (see image below) and that if you use the tab key you can cycle through these elements. Make sure that if you are not in the arrow tool and are holding down the arrow tool then keep this held down along with the tab key to cycle through the available elements.
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

3 Trace the shape of the hole (the Slab tool is active).

4 Check that the slab was cut properly by going to the 3D view. If no hole appears, you probably didnt select the original slab correctly. Tip: To view your work in 3D, press the F3 key.

3D Drawing Window

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Placing Furnishings (Objects)


Placing furniture in ArchiCAD is like placing a dynamic 3D block AutoCAD. 1 Double-click the Object tool (looks like a chair) on the Toolbox. 2 In the Object Settings dialog box, select the furniture from the library. Click OK to close the dialog box. 3 Click to place the object. Notice that there is no need to scale the block, as there is in AutoCAD. 4 To rotate the furniture in place, click the Rotation Geometry Method button in the Info Box before you in insert the object.

Rotated Geometry Method selected in the Info Box

Click to rotate the object in 45-degree increments. Or, enter a value in the Parameters area. To change the objects insertion point, click the x-marker. Notice the heavy black square, which indicates the new insertion point. All objects in ArchiCAD are parametric, but not all to the same degree. Parameters, such as Number of Shelves, Materials, and Style Number, show in the dialog box; click the parameter to change it, within certain limits. Beyond furniture, other objects can be placed into drawings from the object library. Everything from fireplaces and elevators to people and vehicles are included. You should become familiar with what is available before drafting or modeling something new. There is a series of primitive shapes under ArchiCAD Library 12| 1. BASIC LIBRARY 12| 1.5 Special Constructions 12 | Basic Shapes 12, with which you can assemble something close to just about anything required. In addition, thousands of other objects have been modeled by other ArchiCAD users, and are available from www.archicadwiki.com & www.objectsonline.com. Placing Stairs To draw stairs in AutoCAD, you would insert a block or just draw 2D offset lines. In ArchiCAD, there are at least three ways to place stairs in your project: You can build stairs step-by-step with the Slab tool, changing the heights as required. As an alternative, you could use Multiply along with the Vertical Displacement option turned on. This is a good method for short runs of very custom stairs. You can design the stair with the StairMaker add-on, a multistep process described in the manuals. File | Libraries and Objects | New With | StairMaker. The process ultimately produces a custom stair object. The easiest method is to select a set of finished stairs from the stair tool object library. (with the stair tool selected, and settings dialog open). It is strongly suggested that you use and adapt existing stairs as much as possible. They already include other parameters, such as
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

As an alternative, you can rotate the object while in the Object Settings dialog box. Heres how: Pause the cursor over the objects preview image. Notice the curved black arrow.

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being optimally viewable in multistory building models on other stories. For this tutorial, find the Stair Straight 12 object under ArchiCAD Library 12| 1. BASIC LIBRARY 12| 1.4 Building Structures |Stairs 12 | Complete Stairs. Place it in the slab hole you created earlier, matching the stairs insertion point with one corner of the hole.

Switch back to the 2D plan window with the F2 key, Navagator palette, or Mini Navigator toolbar. To remove the marquee from the floor plan window, right-click and select Remove Marquee, or tap the Esc key.

Adding Dimensions
Placing dimensions in ArchiCAD is similar to doing so in AutoCAD: 1 Select the Dimension tool from the Toolbox. 2 Click each intersection where you want a dimension. You can be sure you have snapped to a hotspot, end point or intersection, as the placed point is marked with a circle & cross symbol

Place the stairs insertion point at one corner of the hole in the slab. Tip: To see the cutaway view in 3D, first use the Marquee tool to select the area you want to view (everything outside the marquee rectangle is not rendered). Then switch to the 3D window to see the cutaway view (press the F5 key)

The steps for placing associative continuous dimensions in ArchiCAD. 3 Double-click to end dimension placement. 4 Click where you want to place the dimension text. Notice the associative dimension text, extension lines, and tick marks. To change the parameters of the dimension, such as color and text font, double-click the Dimension tool to display the Dimension Default Settings dialog box.

3D view of a marqueed a area


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Any point that is not snapped to a hotspot, endpoint etc. will show as a box with a cross through it. The point will be dimensioned but it will be static and will not change if the model geometry changes.

Copy Story Elements Copy all elements from one story to another. Open the Story Settings dialog box, select Design | Story Settings. Select the story to copy elements from (1 1st Floor) Uncheck the boxes next to the element types you wish not to copy. Uncheck the box next to Object (chair icon)

Static dimension point ArchiCAD through the use of the cursor and in this case the icons of the of the points added for a dimension is continually giving feedback to the end user.

Story Settings dialog box Click Copy All. The event list box at the bottom right of the Story Setting window should display Copy from 1 Select the destination story (2 2nd Floor) Click the Paste Selected Types button. The event list should display Paste to 2. Click OK to close the dialog box. Notice that the second floor is identical to the first story, with the exception of the stairway and other furniture you may have added. The second story has the same exterior doors as the first story, which, most likely you will want to delete and replace them with windows.
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Dimension Default Settings dialog box Tip: Use the Info Box palette to move objects to another layer. For example, to move the stairway to the A-FLOR-STRS layer, select them, and then click the layer button in the Info Box palette. From the list of layer names, select A-FLOR-STRS.

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Tip: To switch between stories: Press Ctrl+Up arrow (up) or Ctrl+Down arrow (down) Or, double click on the desired story in the Navigator palette Or, press Shift+F2 (up) or Ctrl+F2 (down)

Automatic Hip Roof Creation


To create the roof: 1 Ensure ArchiCAD is displaying the 1st floor. 2 Click the Roof tool on the Toolbox. 3 In the Info Box palette, click+hold the Geometry Methods button. Notice the six roof options:

The hip roof shown in plan and 3D views.

Generating Section and Elevation Views


To create a section view of the building: 1 From the Toolbox, select the Section tool. 2 In the ground floor plan view, click a point outside the building model. Remember to hold down the Shift key to keep the section line orthogonal. 3 Click another point on the other side of the building. This defines the section line. 4 Click a third point, which defines the direction of the section-line view, as well as the depth of the view. Notice that ArchiCAD adds in the annotations for the initial section name.

4 Select the PolyRoof button, located in the lower left (looks like a house in plan view). 5 Spacebar+click any outer line of any exterior wall. 6 In the PolyRoof Settings dialog box, click OK to accept the default values.

Notice that the roof is completed automatically, as shown by the diagonal lines in the floor plan. Switch to the 3D window (F3) to see both stories and the roof. Creating a section with the Section tool.
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5 To view the section, select the section label, right click, and select Open Section. The section is dynamically linked to the model; when you delete or move objects, the view changes in the other windows.

The section view generated by the section line. Tip: To enhance section views, add or delete lines, fills (hatches), dimensions, and notes (text) as necessary. 6 To create an elevation, use the Elevation tool, but draw the line parallel to a wall outside the building, looking toward it.

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TUTORIAL #2: CURTAIN WALL TUTORIAL


In this tutorial, you create an office building based on a grid with columns. You place the structural grid and columns, do space planning, and then add the curtain walls and other details.

You should have a 6x10 structural grid sized 28800 x 33600, which you can place any where in the floor plan window. Notice that the grid is automatically labeled with letters and numbers. (To see the entire grid, select View| Zoom | Fit In Window, or Ctrl+.)

Creating the Structural Grid


1 Start ArchiCAD with a default ArchiCAD template. The exterior elevation labels in the template floor plan will need to be moved away from the center of the drawing to accommodate for the size of the building you are going to create. 2 From the menu bar, select Design| Grid System. 3 In the Grid positions list, select the grid distance next to B in the Horizontal grid lines section, and change the number to 4800. Do the same for C, D & E. 4 Add one more horizontal grid line by clicking the plus sign (+) button. Now you should have horizontal columns A through F. 5 Change the grid spacing for the vertical grid 2 through 5 to 4800. 6 Add 5 more grid lines by clicking the plus sign (+) 5 times. You should end up with a total of 10. All grid lines, excluding A & #1, should be set to 4800. 7 Check the box next to Elements and Grid line intersections in the General settings section. In the same line, select Column from the drop down list, then click the Settings button to the right (on the same line). This will open the Column Default Settings dialog. 8 Change the column height to 4800 under Geometry and Positioning. 9 Click OK to close the Column Settings dialog box. Then click OK to close the Grid System Settings dialog box.

Grid System Settings dialog box

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Space Planning
Define the spaces for the building with the Zone tool. 1 From the Toolbox, double-click the Zone tool. This will open the Zone Settings dialog box: Choose a Zone Category Select the manual geometry method (works like a polyline) 2 Draw the boundaries for the following different areas of the building: Lobby, Offices, Core. The building core consists of elevators, stairs, bathrooms, and mechanical space.

Column Default Settings dialog box

Example of zones to be created Click on the Zone tool icon in the ToolBox Select the Manual Construction method from the ToolBox Click the points to define the perimerter of your first zone

The completed structural grid with grid labels.

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3 After you finish a zone boundary notice the hammer cursor. Click inside the zone to finish the zone to place the zone tag.

Creating Curtain Walls


1 Zoom in to the upper left bay of the column grid. 2 In the Toolbox, double-click the Curtain Wall tool. This will open Curtain Wall Selection Settings dialog box: In the left hand pane, click on the Scheme icon Add 5 guidelines in the Primary Guidelines section (click on the plus sign 5 times), to reach a total of 7. Enter the following sizes for each... A = 250, B = 1000, C = 1000, D = 300, E = 1000, F = 1000, G = 250 Add 1 guideline to the Secondary Guidelines section to reach a total of 4. Enter the following sizes for each... 1 = 300, 2 = 2100, 3 = 2100, 4 = 300 Click on the middle icon button under Pattern Position to set the pattern to start from the center. Click on fields in the preview pane to define glass (white/main) and metal panel fields (shaded/distinct)

Zone boundary area drawn and hammer cursor shown 4 Repeat these steps to create the remaining zones Tip: You can dynamically stretch the zone, then have the zone area calculations updated automatically with the Update Zones feature. Go to Design | Update Zones, then click on Update All Zones.

ArchiCAD calculates the square-footage automatically. Curtain wall settings dialolg box Click OK to close the dialog box
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3 Set the curtain wall construction method to polyline chained. 4 Draw the curtainwall around the perimeter of the column grid. Click precisely on the top left corner of one of the northwest corner column. Click the top right corner of the northeast corner column Click the bottom right corner of the southeast corner column Click the bottom left corner of the southwest corner column Click on the top left corner of the northeast corner column to finish the curtainwall. The sun cursor will appear, click outside the building Curtain walls in place Sun cursor The Place Curtain Wall dialog will appear. Click on the Place button

Placing the Floor Slab


To create the floor slab, use the Slab tool to trace the outside perimeter of the exterior walls. See Adding the Floor Slab on page 34. Most design offices model the slabs as under both the curtain walls and columns, even though it isnt done this way in some types of construction. For this method, set the side material for the slab to match the material of the exterior wall. Double click on the slab tool button to open the Default Slab Settings dialog box, go to the Model section and click on the middle button.

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3D Viewing
To view the 3D model in perspective, double click on Generic Perspective in the Project Map. Double click on Axonometry to change back. To toggle between axonometric and perspective, type Ctrl+F3 for axonometric and Shift+F3 for perspective.

Click OK, place stair in northeast corner of the building Tip: You can use the Find library parts feature to search for objects. In the upper left corner click on the Folder View heading and change it to Find library parts.

3D window of a perspective view after the floor slab is created

Placed elevators, escalator, and stairs

Inserting Elevators, Escalators, and Stairs


With the first floor in place, add some conveying systems to get people to the future second and third floors. 1 Double-click the Object tool. 2 In the Object Settings dialog box: Under Object Library 12, go to 14 Conveying systems 12| 14 20 00 Elevators. Select Elevator Standard 12 Under the Parameters section change No. of Stories to 3 Click OK, place elevator in the center of the core area 3 Double click on the Object tool again. Under Object Library 12, go to 14 Conveying systems 12| 14 30 00 Escalators and Moving Walls 12. Select Escalator 12 Click OK, place escalator to the right of the elevator 4 Double click on the Stair tool. Select the Stair U-shape 12 object
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Creating Additional Stories


1 To create more stories, select Stories in the Navigator Project Map. Right click and select Story Settings. Change the Height to Next to 4800 for the 1. 1st Floor and 2. 2nd Floor. Click on 2. Story. Then click on Insert Above one time to create a 3rd story and again to create a 4th story for a parapet and elevator mechanical tower. Click OK. 2 Copy elements to the upper floors: Return to the Story Settings dialog box: Uncheck the box next to Object in the Edit Elements of Selected Story list box Select the 0 row, and then click Copy All. Select the 1 row, and then click Paste Selected Types. Select the 2 row, and then click Paste Selected Types again. Click OK. Notice that stories 0, 1, and 2 are all identical.

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Adding the Entrance Zoom into the center of the south wall at the ground floor story to prepare for inserting a revolving door. Before you place the door, 3 panels and 4 frame pieces need to be removed. 1 Select the curtain wall. Click on the Edit box that appears on the screen. (see image on the right) 1 Find a section with (2) wide verticle panels side by side. 2 Select the bottom two panels and the 4 frame pieces that connect them all. (see image below)

4 Select the new panel. Right click and select Curtain Wall - Selection Settings. (see image below)

5 Change the panel type to cw door revolving 12

3 Press the Delete key on your keyboard. You should now have one large glass panel to replace the deleted items.

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6 Save this project to a name of your choice. You can use it in the next tutorial.

3D view with the stories and front door added

Photo rendered 3D marquee view of the Massaro House. Click+hold the Marquee button on the Info Box palette to see variations on the marquee. The thin dashed marquee selects a slice of a single floor only, whereas the bold dashed marquee selects a slice through the entire multi-story building. Tip: Tap the F5 key to display the marquee selection in 3D. 3D Filter You can control what element types display in a 3D view. Go to View | Elements in 3D | Filter elements in 3D. For example; if you only want stories 1 and 2 to be viewed, you can do that here. You can also filter out objects, slabs and mesh terrain temporarily.

Refinements to the Design


Create custom layers (press Ctrl+L), and move objects, such as curtain walls to a curtain wall layer, escalators to an escalators layer, and so on. Add another story if you like and create a parapet on top with walls set at 600mm high; a flytower for mechanical, elevators, and stairs; and a roof.

Partial Views
On larger building projects, it is helpful to view only certain portions of a design at a time, rather than the entire building complex. When any objects are selected, you will see only those objects when you go to any 3D view. You can select them with the Arrow or the Marquee tool. The Marquee tool creates a slice right through where it is drawn even through a window or stair. These slice views render in a fraction of the time required to do the entire building model.

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3D Documents
The 3D Document in ArchiCAD 12 allows you to use any 3D view of the model and create a document with dimensions, annotations and additional 2D drawing elements. The 3D Document is a viewpoint that appears in the Navigator Project Map. In many respects, the 3D Document is similar to the Section viewpoint: it is an integral part of the ArchiCAD model, and its model elements are rebuilt automatically or manually, depending on its status. In the 3D Document, you can select model elements and access their settings dialog boxes to make changes in the model, but you cannot edit them graphically or create new model elements. See your ArchiCAD 12 Reference Guide for more information

Advantages over Xrefs and Paperspace


Doing multistory building projects in a single drawing file in ArchiCAD has some significant advantages over the classic AutoCAD approach of splitting up each floor as a separate drawing and xrefing it back to a master drawing, where the different floors are viewed in layer sets in paperspace (layout) viewports. With that technique, however, coordinating all work on a large multistory project is a difficult, full-time job. The ArchiCAD stories feature reduces this to a relatively easy task. Since the project can be all in one file, it is much easier to check and coordinate the interactions between stories. A second serious drawback of an xref master file is that nothing is changeable you have to go back to the original drawing file to make changes, sometimes without easy reference to whole building issues. To deal with such issues, users sometimes reference the master file back, creating the potential glitch of circular reference files. In ArchiCAD, the total building is always there, so changes are easier. Even global, simultaneous multistory changes are possible in ArchiCAD, both with the bold Marquee tool and while in 3D views (even a 3D top view), as well as in section and elevation views. ArchiCAD enables you to split up the model into modules if necessary. The modules can be hotlinked in a similar fashion to xrefs. For collaboration, however, ArchiCAD provides Teamwork to coordinate the work of simultaneous designers automatically. See TeamWork on page 25.

3D document view with dimensions

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TUTORIAL #3: CREATING A PLOT LAYOUT


To plot a single drawing at a single scale, ArchiCAD uses the same method as in AutoCAD: select File | Plot. Although if you wish to print to a small format printer you would use the Print command in ArchiCAD.

Plot Layouts and Multi-scale Drawing Sheets


Sheets are created and managed in the Layout Map portion of the Navigator. This is essentially a 2D-only space inside of ArchiCAD. As with paperspace, it is another whole environment in which you place your various drawing views at chosen scales, and compose your sheet sets. 1 In ArchiCAD, open your project file from the previous tutorial. 2 Click on the Layout Book button in the Navigator 3 Under the A-1 PLANS folder, double click on layout A-101 1st FLOOR PLAN. 4 There should already be a title block and a view of the 1st floor plan. The default title block, known as the master, is too small for the building in the previous tutorial 5 In the Settings list in the Navigator, you can edit the sheet number, sheet name and select the master (title block). Change the master from A2 to A1

6 Select the 1st floor drawing view and move it (Ctrl+D) to the center so the complete building fits inside the title block border. 7 Stretch the drawing view borders to fit inside the master borders. Select the view again Use the Arrow tool and hover over the edge of the drawing view border until you get the mercedes cursor. Click the edge with the mercedes cursor. the pet palette should pop up. From the pet palette click the Offset Edge button, then stretch the edges of the view to the inside of the title block border. Drawing Titles By default, the drawing title will automatically display under your drawing view. Its title will be the name of the drawing view as it is listed in the View Map, and the scale will display automatically. This behavior can be controlled with the drawing views Drawing Selection Settings. Select the drawing view from the layout or the Navigator, right click and select Drawing Settings.

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TUTORIAL #4: MAKING A CUSTOM OBJECT


To create a custom object, such as a window, the concept is to model the frame, glass and muntins with the slab tool. Select the whole thing, and save as 3D Model object.

Create a Custom Window Object


Here you will create a Roman arch window. 1 In the Coordinates palette, turn on the smaller 50 snap grid. 2 From the Toolbox, double click the Slab tool Change the thickness at top to 120 mm. Change the to Current Story to 60 mm. Set the slab cover fill to 50%. In the Model list, change the 3 model material choices to Wd-Walnut Horizontal. Click OK to close the dialog box.

3 Draw a slab 1000 mm (X) by 1500 mm (Y) 4 Create an arch at the top of the slab Select the slab Hold your cursor over the top edge to get the mercedes, then click & hold so the pet palette comes up. Pick the Curve Edge button, then pull the edge up 500 mm to form a perfect half-circle arch.

Slab tool and Coordinates Palette

Creating an arch from the top edge of the slab 5 Turn off the grid: View | Grid Display 6 Copy the new slab, and place it off to the side. We will come back to the copy later. 7 Select the Fill tool. The fill parameters dont matter, since youll be removing the fill later.
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Slab Selection Settings dialog box

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8 Spacebar+click the arc with the Magic Wand cursor, creating a color fill inside the pink lines.

Using the Magic Wand to fill the interior of the object. 9 Select the edge of the fill with Shift+click, and then hover over the edge to get the mercedes, click+hold an edge to display the pet palette. Select the Offset edge icon, and then visually offset. (As an alternative, you can type R for relative distance, and then enter 50 mm for the size of the window frame). Do this for each edge. See image below. 10 Cut a hole in the slab: Activate the Slab tool. Select the offset tool from the control palette, then magic wand the edge of the external size of the window. Move the icon inside the shape Enter 50 mm for the offset, for the frame depth This has just created another slab the same as the first but slightly smaller Deselect all the slabs 11 Create the Glass: Select the outside slab
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Access the pet palette by selecting the Mercedes symbol anywnhere around the outside of the shape along its edge. Magic wand the inner slab. This will remove the inner slab from the shape and leave the inner one in place. Select the inner slab and change to the following... Change the thickness (at top) to 12 mm Change the to Current Story height to 6 mm Change the material to Glass-Blue 12 Create the muntins: Double-click the Slab tool, and make these changes in the dialog box: Change the thickness to 38 mm Change the To Current Story or To Home Story (from 3D window) height to 20 mm On the Info Box palette, select the Rectangle draw option. Draw the muntins. See example below.

The window with muntins and glass. 13 The non-rectangular wall hole: If we leave out this step, walls will not conform to the arch of the window, and only cut a rectangle. Since this object is not rectangle we need to define the wall hole shape separately with a slab. Select the copy of the slab you created and placed to the side in step #6.

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Press Ctrl+T to bring up Slab Selection Settings dialog box. In the Listing and Labeling section, change the ID to WALLHOLE. - This is what makes the wall conform to the non-rectangular shape. Change the model material to 08 | Glass-Clear Change the thickness to 6 mm Change the Current Story height to 3 mm Click OK Drag the slab directly on to the window frame slab in the exact same spot. 14 Ground plane: The outside face of the window should be set on the ground plane i.e. 0. Everything lower thatn 0 will appear outside the wall. Select all the elements that makeup the window - frame, muntins, glass and wallhole slab. Elevate 60 mm: Edit | Move | Elevate or Ctrl+9 Enter 60 into the popup dialog box Click OK 15 The final selection: Select the elements that makeup the window - frame, muntins, glass and wallhole slab. Press the F5 key to display the selection in 3D Select all the elements again 16 Change the 3D view projection: Since the window object will not be placed in a plan view (like it is drawn), you need to change its 3D orientation before you save it as an object. From the menu bar, select View | 3D View Mode | 3D Projection Settings. Make sure Parallel Projection Settings is the title at the top of the dialog box: If it is not, click the Parallel Projections button. Change the Azimuth to 90 Change the axonometry setting to Frontal axonometry. See image below.

Click OK to exit the dialog box

3D Projection Setting dialog box in Parallel Projection mode 17 Save to file: Select all the parts of the arch window. From the menu bar, select File | Libraries and Objects | Save 3D Model as Type in a unique name, and then save it to a new folder The Save as Library Part dialog box will appear, select... Save as a Window Remove redundant lines from symbol should be checked. Editable GDL Script should be checked 18 Draw a new wall with the center construction method (reference line), no more than 3000mm. 19 Click on the Window tool to place the new window in a wall.

The new window object can even be placed in curved walls.


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Creating Custom Doors The steps for creating a custom door are the same as for a window, except you add the door knob or handle, and another slab or two.

Creating Other Custom Objects You can use any combination of ArchiCAD objects slabs, meshes, roofs, and other library objects to create custom objects.

Doors displayed (from left to right) by ArchiCAD in shaded view, fully rendered, hidden-line view, side view, and as a 2D symbol.

Fireplace displayed (from left to right) by ArchiCAD as a 2D symbol, side view, hidden-line view, in shaded view, and fully rendered.

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Chapter 6: Transferring Drawings

CHAPTER 6: TRANSFERRING DRAWINGS


ArchiCAD can open CAD files from different CAD programs. When working with different consultants there is a necessity to translate your model documentation to other formats. In this case we will look at DWG. Understanding the translator will enable you to achieve a quality output that will be in keeping with your documentation but will appear to have been modelled in the other software.

DWG Import
Importing an AutoCAD .dwg file into ArchiCAD is almost as easy as opening an ArchiCAD project: 1 Select File | Open. (If you choose File | Merge instead of Open, the ArchiCAD standard layers are retained.) 2 In the dialog box, change Files of type to DWG File (*.dwg). 3 Browse to, and then select an AutoCAD file. 4 Change the Translator to 02 For editable import. 5 Click Open.

HOW TO TRANSFER 2D AND 3D FILES


As you probably already know, AutoCAD provides no help in translating its drawings to competing CAD systems, other than its ability to save to earlier versions of .dwg . For this reason, ArchiCAD performs all the work translating. Graphisoft provides extensive documentation on translating drawings between AutoCAD and ArchiCAD. From the Help menu, select ArchiCAD Reference Guide, then go to Collaboration, Data Exchange. This chapter provides additional tips and insight for understanding translation.

Lower portion of the Open File dialog box If you need greater control over the translation, you can modify and create new translator files.

Importing from AutoCAD to ArchiCAD


In any new project you may need to use an existing AutoCAD file to represent existing conditions or represent the work of a consultant. There are 3 different ways to bring an AutoCAD file into an ArchiCAD model Attach as an Xref - File | External Content | Attach Xref Placed External Drawing - File | External Content | Place External Drawing. Merge - File | File Special | Merge

Translators
When you Xref or Merge a .DWG file you can control the input in regard to pens, layers and line types with a translator file. From the File menu, select File Special | DXF-DWG Translation Setup. The DXF-DWG Translation Setup window will appear. Within this window, is a list of available translators. From here you can edit and customize your own translators. Translator files are stored in \ArchiCAD 12\Defaults\DXF-DWG Translators. These files are in XML format and it is possible to edit them with an XML editor, but that can be tricky. It is best to do it through ArchiCAD. See The Translator File on page 56.
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Evaluating the Translation


No translation between CAD packages is ever perfect. Here are some of the changes ArchiCAD makes translating AutoCAD drawings: Polylines are exploded as grouped lines; widths are lost. Objects made from polylines, such as donuts and polygons, retain their shape but lose their width. Shapes are not import, but shapes in complex line types are. Xlines and rays are cut off at the drawing extents. Proxy and OLE objects are not imported. Blocks can be translated as exploded 2D elements, grouped 2D elements or library parts.

Adding Layer Standards


A new ArchiCAD file has the same layer names as the most-recently opened drawing or if you start from an existing template (unless you hold down the Alt-key and select New and Reset). Opening either an AutoCAD or ArchiCAD file, and then selecting New creates a new file with the same layer standard as the previous drawing. You can create new layers as needed by Document | Layers | Layer Settings (Model Views)| New. As an alternative, use File | Merge to merge the layers with any other drawing file. One of this books technical editors tends to favor using the ArchiCAD layers conversion. He says, This is very close to my offices standard (simple) layer set up in AutoCAD. I approach this by setting up a plot style to suit the drawing; this is a fairly fast process since each drawing set has three to nine lines that require a thickness. Other layers are set to a thin to medium line thickness (0.18 - 0.25). Then, the drawing can be used as a conventional 2D drawing. If this does not function well for you, you can go into AutoCAD and set the line styles by layer. This takes longer, but it is effective.

Text Translation
Of all entities in a 2D CAD drawing, text is perhaps the most difficult to translate accurately, because it contains so many parameters font, height, width factor, line spacing, justification, angle, and so on. ArchiCAD correctly imports single-line text, with these exceptions: Text with a negative obliquing angle is sloped forward. Upside-down text is printed right side up, but displaced by one line. Width factor is ignored. Vertical text is placed sideways. Unicode characters are displayed as question marks (?) by ArchiCAD. Paragraph text (mtext) is imported correctly in paragraphs, but some properties are lost, such as color. Leader text, which is created with mtext, is surrounded by curly brackets, as in {Leader}. Tolerance text and symbols have an incorrect scale factor, making the tolerance too small.

EXPORTING FROM ARCHICAD TO AUTOCAD


You have several choices when exporting a project (drawing) from ArchiCAD to AutoCAD. You can export the entire 3D model, which appears in AutoCAD as 3D faces (lots of them). You can export to different rendering applications from the 3D window, although ArchiCAD does have an integral high quality render application called Lightscape. Or, you can export the 2D views created by ArchiCAD as plan, section, and elevation drawings.

Exporting to 3D
To export a complete 3D model: 1 Ensure a 3D view window is current. 2 From the menu bar, select File | Save As. 3 In the Save as dialog box, click Files of type, and then select DWG File (*.dwg).

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4 Click Save.

In addition to .dwg, ArchiCAD also exports its drawings in other formats that AutoCAD imports: .dxf (drawing interchange format), .dwf (drawing Web format), .wmf (Windows metafile), as well as TIFF raster format.

The Translator File


To control the output of DWG files from ArchiCAD, you can configure the DWG format options, in the DWG-DXF Translation Setup window. See image below. The Translator is broken up into several different sections: Drawing Unit Set to 1 meter, 1 millimeter, 1 inch, 1 foot, or a custom number. Save Options This figure shows a 3D view in ArchiCAD, and the result in AutoCAD. The shapes in AutoCAD are 3D blocks made of lines. Both views have hidden lines removed, but look different because of the differing viewpoints. Tip: You can output the ArchiCAD drawing directly to the LightScape rendering package, retaining all lights, textures, and materials. From the menu bar, select File | Save As while in the 3D window, and then select Lightscape File (*.lp). The Save Options section covers the file format version to be created and how to process paperspace and modelspace.

Exporting in 2D
To export a 2D view: 1 Ensure the floor plan view of the story you wish to export is current. 2 From the menu bar, select File | Save As. 3 Change the Save as type to DWG File (*.dwg). 4 Set the Translator to 03 For as is output The figure below shows a 2D floor plan in ArchiCAD, along with the result in AutoCAD. The walls in AutoCAD are blocks made of lwpolylines (with width) filled with solid hatch patterns. Even arcs and circles are made of lwpolylines. Dimensions are blocks made of lines and text.

Translation Setup dialog box


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Template File Along with the translator you should setup an AutoCAD template drawing file. This file can contain all the standards and drawing information that your clients and consultants want to have in their drawings. All the layers and line types you want to have in your exported AutoCAD files should be inside this template drawing. It is a good idea to have a master AutoCAD file that has all the layers and line types that your client or consultants need. You could take their master file and turn it into your DWG translator template. Attributes The Attributes section of the translator is where most of the advanced configuration happens. To achieve the greatest control over your output, you will need to utilize each section here Layers You can convert ArchiCAD entities by mapping pen number over to layers in AutoCAD. This is done via the Pen-based layer names section. Some feel it is unnecessary to use this option because the layer name conversion option does a good job mapping layers. But the Pen to Layer option gives you the greatest control over your translation. With it you can separate out the door, window and object components on to their own layers in AutoCAD. The attribute assignments you create will sort in the list according to the order they were entered. Unless you have all your pens figured out when you start your project, you will make your pen assignments as your project evolves. Then your pens will be out of order. This is where having XML editing skills can be useful. Layer name conversion This is pretty self explanatory. Map your ArchiCAD layer to a different layer name in AutoCAD. Pens and Colors Check the box for Set all Elements Colors and Lineweights to BYLAYER. This will allow for greater control of the drawings elements inside AutoCAD. In order to make this work most effectively, you will need to have a template file (dwg) with all the layers already setup with their colors and line types set. Otherwise,
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

ArchiCAD will create the layers with the color white, and a line type set to continuous. Line types Map your ArchiCAD line types into AutoCAD line types. This is very important to utilize. Every CAD/BIM package handles line types differently. The same line type in one package may be named something different in another. For example: the Double Dashed line type in ArchiCAD is closest to Center in AutoCAD. The following is a basic list of matching line types... ArchiCAD Solid Line Dense Dotted Dotted Dashed Long Dashed Dot & Dashed Double Dashed Triple Dashed Hidden Line Fills Fills can be translated in the same manner as line types. Scale factors can differ greatly between ArchiCAD and AutoCAD. Because of this, some fill patterns such as one of the concrete patterns export to a scale that is too tight. AutoCAD Continuous Dot2 Dot PMOLD Dashed Dashedot2 Center2 Phantom2 Hidden

Exporting with the Publisher


The Publisher feature lets you set up publication sets, which can be different for each consultant, engineer, and client. The advantage is that ArchiCAD publishes the entire set of drawings with one click to the Web, to file or direct to a plotter The published files can be in a number of different formats, including .dgn, .dwg, pdf. This procedure increases efficiency because you do not need to save the drawings one by one, and there is no worrying that you left out a drawing.

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Using AutoCAD Xrefs in ArchiCAD


You can use AutoCAD .dwg files as Xrefs (externally referenced drawings) directly in ArchiCAD. This is different from importing (or translating) the drawings into ArchiCAD format. The drawings can be either attached or overlaid without translation into ArchiCAD even while being Xrefed simultaneously by other AutoCAD stations. Xref layers do not affect ArchiCADs layers or pens. You can easily separate the Xref layers in the Layer Settings dialog. And it is possible to unload or bind the Xrefs, just like in AutoCAD. To import an AutoCAD file as an external reference file: 1 Select File | External Content | Attach Xref. 2 In the Attach XREF dialog box: Use the Browse button to find the folder and .dwg file to attach. Select the file, and then click OK. 3 In the next dialog box regarding fonts, browse to where the font files (.shx) are stored or click Skip All. 4 To see the drawing, select Display | Fit in Window.

Options for attaching the xref: Rotation Insertion point. Scale Do an Overlay (one-level xref) instead of Attach (a multi-level xref). And whether to import font shape files. The default settings work fine for most cases, with the possible exception of changing the scale to inches (from mm) and the scale factor to 1 (from 1000). All AutoCAD layers show up in ArchiCADs layer list by their original name, prefixed by the file name and a vertical bar just like in AutoCAD. To view layers, press Ctrl+L. While you cannot edit the xref, you can snap to all intersections. In addition, you can Spacebar+click with the Magic Wand any lines and polylines into walls and other 3D elements. ArchiCADs support for xrefs means that the designer can xref a drawing to use as an underlay for a 3D model. Turn on only the layers needed; pop up all the walls by Spacebar+clicking them; pop in doors, windows, and so on; and then detach the referenced AutoCAD drawing. When you bind xrefs, the .dwg file becomes part of the ArchiCAD project file. To edit individual lines, you need to first ungroup them. If you wish to use AutoCAD blocks as named objects in ArchiCAD, you should Merge (or Open) the DWG file instead of Binding it as an xref. (It will automatically create a whole library folder for all the AutoCAD blocks.)

Attach Xref dialog box

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Chapter 6: Transferring Drawings

INTELLIGENCE LOST
It always has been difficult to translate drawings accurately between different CAD systems, because every CAD package has some unique objects. For example, no other CAD package has AutoCADs polyline objects. Similarly, no other CAD package has ArchiCADs GDL objects. In many cases, however, translated objects have identical matches, such as line to line, and circle to circle. When a match cannot be made, one of two things occurs: either (1) the object is deleted; or (2) an approximation is made. When an approximation is made, intelligence is lost. The problem of translation inaccuracy becomes more acute with smart objects, such as ArchiCADs GDL objects and Autodesk Architectural Desktops objects. (A smart object interacts intelligently with other smart objects.) Smart objects are simply too complex to permit a straightforward match. For this reason, several initiatives are underway to allow matching of smart objects, including IAIs IFC classes and the GDL object enabler.

ArchiCAD Support
With the continual developments of IFC, the format Is gradually emerging as a standard and its adoption is becoming increasingly evident where people are now needing to exchange data in a more intelligent manner.

AutoCAD Support
The core Autodesk product AutoCAD, however, does not have basic smart objects, such as walls, doors, windows, and so on. Support for IFC architectural entities is thus a moot issue. When you save an ArchiCAD drawing as an AutoCAD file, all the information that makes ArchiCADs walls and other objects smart is stripped out erased because AutoCAD cannot work with the information. If that dumb drawing is imported back into ArchiCAD, the plan view may look all right, but all the 3D data and all the smarts are gone.

IFC Classes
The IAI (International Alliance for Interoperability) created a standard that would allow intelligent objects to be exchanged between different CAD packages. This standard is called IFC, which stands for Industry Foundation Classes. The IAI is an alliance of organizations dedicated to bring about a coordinated change for the improvement of productivity and efficiency in the construction and facilities management industry (Building Smart).

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Chapter 7: Productivity Techniques

CHAPTER 7: PRODUCTIVITY TECHNIQUES


In this chapter, we describe some additional productivity tips. We say additional, because earlier chapters offer a number of tips for being more productive with ArchiCAD, such as using AutoCAD xrefs in ArchiCAD, and creating section views of the Virtual Building model.

ARCHICAD CUSTOMIZATION
One of the primary keys to increased productivity in AutoCAD is customizing it to meet your need. This includes creating custom toolbars, line types, and keyboard shortcuts, and even a custom user interface that adds wall, door, and stair drawing routines written in AutoLISP. This is largely unnecessary for offices using ArchiCAD, because it is designed for architects, while AutoCAD is not. After using ArchiCAD out-of-the-box for a while, we recommend that you create template drawings that retain layer setups, grids, wall heights and types, and so on. These template drawings save you time.

Shortcut Keystrokes
The real key to productivity in ArchiCAD, however, is learning its shortcuts, which are key combinations that instantly invoke commands and modes. These shortcuts involve keystrokes like Ctrl+Alt+click, Shift+Alt+click, Spacebar+click, and so on. The full list of shortcuts can be found under Options | Work Environment | Keyboard Shortcuts | Keyboard Shortcut Preview, Show Shortcut List in Browser. A subset appears in Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference on page 64.

Tip: You can also assemble a line type from line segments on the floor plan select and copy it, than paste it into this same window. While creating a line type in AutoCAD is tough, it is easy in ArchiCAD. You duplicate an existing pattern, give it a new name, and then modify it via the dialog box. Just choose something relatively close to what you are after, and then change a few parameters to create your custom patterns. No typing code in text files, as with AutoCAD.

Selection Tools
Selecting by Object Type
Selecting a specific object, such as a hatch pattern in AutoCAD is always tough. ArchiCAD can make its selections specific to an object type. For example, to select a fill, first click the Fill tool in the Toolbox. Then hold down the Shift key, and click the fill to select it. Selection is also confirmed by the use of the Element Information palette. It allows you to cycle elements before selecting what is required.
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Custom Line Types


To make custom linetypes, fill patterns, materials (textures for rendering), and composite walls in ArchiCAD, go to Options on the menu bar, and then select what you wish to create. For example, to create a custom line type, select Options | Element Attributes | Line Types.

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Chapter 7: Productivity Techniques

Find & Select


Use the Find & Select tool to select a specific group of elements. This tool is similar to the Qselect command or SSX utility in AutoCAD. Keyboard shortcut Ctrl+F or... Edit | Find & Select

Selection and Element Information Palettes


You can save multiple different selection sets with the Selection Palette. Give them each a unique name. Then double click on the name in the list to select the elements. The Element Information palette displays information on the currently selected elements (similar to the List command in AutoCAD)

Find & Select tool Define your criteria by adding attributes such as layer names and pen color. Add attribute types with the More Choices button, or remove them with the Fewer Choices button. Once your selection is defined, click the plus sign button (+) from the dialog box to select the elements. You can edit the selection with normal editing tools or perform Ctrl+T to invoke the Default Settings dialog box to edit the properties and/or parameters. Element Information Palette & Selections Palette

Special ArchiCAD Commands


Here are a couple of useful ArchiCAD commands you might overlook.

Add-Ons
The are numerous add-ons and special libraries for ArchiCAD. For example there is an Add-On that imports survey data from DXF and text (x,y,z-coordinate) files for terrain modeling with ArchiCADs own tools.

Favorites
An important productivity feature in ArchiCAD is the Favorites palette. Not to be confused with the term Favorites used in Microsofts Web browser, Internet Explorer. Favorites work like menu macros do in AutoCAD. You can pre-set a tool or object with a specific combination of pens, layers or parameters. Then recall it quickly by double clicking on that favorite in the palette. Using favorites also enables users to spend time modeling and drafting rather than setting up tools. For example to embellish a project view, the user may overlay lines and fills. All these can be set up so that they show the correct pens, outlines and also be on the correct layer. Dimensions can be kept consistent and if a user does not use the favorites, all you have to do to ensure the drawing

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Chapter 7: Productivity Techniques

complies with the office standard is to select the offending entities and then double click the favorite. These favorite settings can be transferred from project to project. It allows your firm to set up new drawings quickly by choosing styles that can include materials, heights, special layers, and colors.

The Publisher shown in the Navigator palette To use Favorites, a tool other than Arrow or Marquee must be active: 1 From the menu bar, select Window | Palettes | Favorites. 2 Click the small arrow in the right top corner of the Favorites palette. 3 Save the current settings by name.

Beyond Customizing the Graphic Tools of ArchiCAD


The most powerful aspect of using ArchiCAD over AutoCAD is the concept of creating a Virtual Building versus drafting it. In ArchiCAD, you set up templates to control the line types, layer settings, grids and other graphical elements that are required for the graphical look of a project. These are all techniques that are familiar in any CAD environment. ArchiCAD really shines in the ability to create templates that address real building issues. ArchiCAD out of the box comes with default settings for wall heights, types, slab settings, object settings, and so on. These settings can all be customized to create walls specific to the projects needs; windows that match the actual windows both in plan and 3D; furniture that is specific to the project; and floor systems that are the correct depth and composition. In short, the process of designing a building involves thousand upon thousands of decisions in the design process that the Virtual Building captures. As an example, lets use a window in a two-story house. The designer of the house makes decisions of window width, height, type, sill height, material, manufacturer, and so on. In addition to the geometry
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Batch Output with the Publisher


The Publisher has features useful to AutoCAD users: it batch-translates multi-drawing sets from ArchiCAD to DWG format. Although documents can be batch printed, plotted and translated to different formats it is useful to translate multi-drawing sets from ArchiCAD to DWG format. You select which drawings should be translated, and which AutoCAD version to use. The options are saved to Publisher Sets At any time during the project cycle, you can select a publisher set to generate an updated set of AutoCAD files. See Publisher on page 16.

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of the window, the graphic quality, such as pen settings and layers, would also be set in the object. These are all decisions that are embedded in the window through the use of the parameters of the object. There may be ten unique window types in a typical house, all of which have these settings. In ArchiCAD, these parameters can be set manually window by window by opening up each object and setting the parameters. Tip: You can store these windows in the Favorites palette. By double-clicking them in the palette, their settings are automatically transferred to the Window Tool, and the cursor is ready to place the window in the wall. This technique has the following benefits: The drafting speed of the Virtual Building is increased. Opening and closing objects and manually setting parameters of individual objects is a time-consuming task. Presetting these objects with the decisions that should only be made by the designer of the project decreases the need for replicating this decision making process on each object. If a project is only going to use the ten window types listed above, the decision is made once, and then they are used for the life of the project. This decision making process can be applied to the entire building from windows, to walls, to roofs, and furniture. The final template for a project is a collection of objects in the staging area of the project, that are embedded with the language of that particular building type. These templates become the specification of the Virtual Building, and a communication and quality control tool for the project team. Templates can be saved and archived for future projects. The quality control aspect of using project templates is a tremendous timesaving technique in ArchiCAD. In a typical AutoCAD setup, the project architect constantly checks the drafting quality of the junior CAD operator in the team. Questions, such as is the window size that is drawn in the AutoCAD elevation the correct type for the project, are no longer relevant. The ArchiCAD user, by using the template of the ten windows knows that the language of the building type meets the requirements of the project.
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

The use of Virtual Building templates is a concept similar to having a box of objects that fit in with the project requirements. This box of Lego-style objects have rules decided by the designer of the building and carried through the life of the project in the ArchiCAD Virtual Building.

New & Reset


To reset ArchiCAD to its stripped down default settings, use the New and Reset command. This ensures you do not use settings from a previous drawing. Hold down the Alt key, and then from the menu bar choose File | New and Reset. This command does not appear in the File menu unless you hold down the Alt key. As an alternative, you can use the Ctrl+Alt+N keyboard shortcut.

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Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference

APPENDIX A: COMMAND CROSS-REFERENCE


This appendix helps you find that certain command in ArchiCAD. Some commands are similar, such as Mirror; others are different, such as the equivalent to AutoCADs Move, which is found in ArchiCADs Edit | Drag menu. For a list of equivalent terms, Appendix B: ArchiCAD-AutoCAD Glossary on page 69. AutoCADs equivalent command is shown in italics. Selection Tools Arrow Marquee Design Tools Wall Door Window Skylight Roof Beam Column Slab Stairs Mesh Curtain Wall Zone Object Documentation Tools Dimension (Dimension) Level Dimension Text (Mtext) Label (Qleader) Fill (Bhatch) Line (Line) Circle (Circle) Polyline (Pline) Drawing

SELECTING OBJECTS
Click selects a single object, and deselect others. Shift+click adds or subtracts from selection set. Windowing nodes (grips) selects multiple objects, and deselects others. Shift+windowing nodes reverts the selection of multiple objects. Repeatedly click node selects one object from overlapping nodes. Click blank area deselects all objects.

TOOL SETTINGS
Many of ArchiCADs selection and drawing commands are found on the Toolbox. To set the tools parameters, double-click its button to see the Settings dialog box (except for the Arrow and Marquee tools). The Arrow tool has its own palette called Coordinate, shown below.

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference

ArchiCAD Command Equivalents


This list of commonly-used AutoCAD commands shows the equivalent menu selection and shortcut in ArchiCAD. By no means complete, the list does include all ArchiCAD commands that have keyboard shortcuts. AutoCAD Command .xz .yz .xy @ < AdCenter Align Aperture Array Block Boundary Break F Circle Coords Copy
ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

AutoCAD Command Copym CopyClip CutClip Dimlinear DrawOrder Above DrawOrder Front DrawOrder Under DrawOrder Back Dimlinear DSettings DView

ArchiCAD Coordinate Palette Selection Edit | Distribute Edit | Copy Edit | Cut

ArchiCAD Shortcut ... Ctrl+C Ctlr+X ... ... ... ... ...

D
ArchiCAD Coordinate Palette Selection X coordinate Y coordinate Z coordinate Vector radius Vectors angle ArchiCAD Shortcut x y z r a Document | Documenting Tools | Dimension Edit | Display Order | Bring Forward Edit | Display Order | Bring to Front Edit | Display Order | Send Backward Edit | Display Order | Send to Back Document | Documenting Tools | Dimension Options | Work Environment | Work environment | User Preference Schemes View | 3D View Mode | 3D Projection Settings

A
File | Libraries and Objects | ... Library Manager Edit | Align Options | Work Environment ... | Mouse Constraints and Methods Edit | Move | Multiply Ctrl+U

... Ctrl+Shift+ F3

B
Edit | Grouping | Group Spacebar & click Edit | Reshape | Split Ctrl+G ... ... ...
...

E
Erase Elevation Explode Extend Fillet to clean walls Edit | Delete Backspace or Delete Design | Story Settings Ctrl+7 Edit | Reshape | Explode into Ctrl+= Current View Edit | Reshape | Adjust Ctrl+- (dash)

C
Document | Documenting Tools | Arc/Circle Coordinates Palette Window | Palettes | Coordinates Edit | Move |Drag a copy

F
Edit | Reshape | Intersect ...

Ctrl+Shift+D

65

Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference

AutoCAD Command Fillet to curve lines Find Grid Group Create Group Suspend Group Ungroup Hide Hatch

ArchiCAD Coordinate ArchiCAD Palette Selection Shortcut Edit | Reshape | ... Fillet/Chamfer Edit | Search & Replace Text ...

AutoCAD Command Move MSpace

G
View | Grid Options | Grids & Background Edit | Grouping | Group Ctrl+G Edit | Grouping | Suspend Alt+G Groups Edit | Grouping | Ungroup Ctrl+Shift+G New Offset Open Orbit Ortho Pan PasteClip PageSetup

ArchiCAD Coordinate ArchiCAD Palette Selection Shortcut Edit | Move | Drag Ctrl+D 2D and 3D design windows in Project Map & View Map N File | New Ctrl+N

O
Spacebar+click with Offset method set on the Control Box palette File | Open Orbit button on 3D view window Hold down the Shift key
...

H
View | 3D view Mode | Hidden Line Document | Documenting Tools | Fill
Alt+Shift+F6

Ctrl+O O
...

...

P
Pan button on view window Edit | Paste File | Page Setup Navagator palette | Layout Book | Settings Document | Documenting Tools | Polyline File | Plot File | Print View | Guide Line Options Lock cursors vertical position Lock cursors horizontal position Lock the current radius and/or distance Lock the current angle Middle mouse button Ctrl+V Ctrl+Shift+P ... Shift+L ... Ctrl+P
...

L
Layer Layout Lengthen Limits Document | Layers | Layer Settings Navigator Palette | Layout Book Edit | Reshape | Adjust View | Zoom | Set Home View Ctrl+L ... Ctrl+- (dash) ...

PLine Plot Polar Tracking

M
MatchProp Edit | Element Settings | Pickup Parameters Alt+C

Mirror keep source objects Mirror delete source objts. Edit | Move | Mirror

Edit | Element Settings | Ctrl+Alt Inject Parameters Edit | Move | Mirror a Copy Ctrl+Shift+M Ctrl+M

Alt+X Alt+Y Alt+R Alt+A

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference

AutoCAD Command Properties PSpace

ArchiCAD Coordinate ArchiCAD Palette Selection Shortcut Edit | Element Settings | tool Ctrl+T Selection Settings Navigator (Palette) | Layout ... Book

AutoCAD Command Snapang Spell Spline Stretch Subtract

Q
QSelect Quit Rectangle Redo Redraw Regen Render Revolve Rotate Save SaveAs Scale Select Select All Shade Slice Snap Edit | Find & Select File | Exit Ctrl+F Ctrl+Q

R
Document |Documenting Shift+L Tools |Polyline with rectangular geometry method set Edit | Redo Ctrl+Shift+Z Ctrl+R View | Refresh | Rebuild Ctrl+Shift+R Document | Creative Imaging ... | Photorender Projection Design | Design Extras | ... Profiler (a plug-in) Edit | Move | Rotate Ctrl+E

ArchiCAD Coordinate Palette Selection Options | Work Environment | Mouse Constraints and Methods Document | Spell Checker | Open Spell Checker Document | Documenting Tools | Spline Edit | Reshape | Stretch Design | Solid Element Operations

ArchiCAD Shortcut ... ... ... Ctrl+H


...

T
Trim Edit | Reshape | Trim Design | Trim to Roof Ctrl+click Ctrl+O Ctrl+Z ...
...

U
Undo UCS UCS Origin Units Edit | Undo View | Grid Options User Origin button on the Coordinates palette Options | Project Preferences | Working Units & Levels

...

S
File | Save File | Save As Edit | Reshape | Resize ... Edit | Select All View | 3D View Mode | Shading Edit | Reshape | Split View | Grid Snap Ctrl+S Ctrl+Shift+S Ctrl+K Shift+Click Ctrl+A ... ... S View

V
Navagator (Palette) | View Map ...

W
WBlock File | Libraries and Objects | Save Selection as...

X
XAttach Xref File | External Content | ... Attach Xref File | External Content | Xref ... Manager

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67

Appendix A: Command Cross-Reference

AutoCAD Command Zoom Zoom All Zoom Extents Zoom Previous Zoom Window

ArchiCAD Coordinate Palette Selection

ArchiCAD Shortcut

The following ArchiCAD commands have keyboard shortcuts, but no AutoCAD equivalent: Description ArchiCAD Shortcut Window | Full Screen Ctrl+\ (backslash) View | Navigate | Stories | Ctrl+down Go down a story arrow View | Navigate | Stories | Ctrl+up Go up a story arrow View | Trace Alt+F2 Design | Story Settings Ctrl+7 Teamwork | Receive Changes Ctrl+J Teamwork | Send and Receive Ctrl+Shift+J Changes ArchiCAD Menu Selection

Z
View | Zoom View | Zoom | Home Zoom View | Zoom | Fit in Window To Previous Zoom button on drawing view window Increase Zoom button on drawing view window Full Screen Down a Story Up a Story Trace view Story Settings Receive Changes Send & Receive Changes

Ctrl+ (apostrophe) Ctrl+[(square bracket) Ctrl+Shift+

3
3dClip Zoom All Zoom Extents View | Elements in 3D View Ctrl+Shift+Y | 3D Cutting Planes View | Zoom | Home Zoom View | Zoom | Fit in Ctrl+ Window (apostrophe)

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Appendix B: ArchiCAD-AutoCAD Glossary

APPENDIX B: ARCHICAD-AUTOCAD GLOSSARY


Some of the terms used by ArchiCAD may be unfamiliar to you, such as Hotlink, which is similar to AutoCAD's Xref command. In other cases, ArchiCAD uses the same word but intends a different meaning. For example, both CAD packages use the word drag In AutoCAD, drag is a verb, while in ArchiCAD it is a command. And, in some cases, ArchiCAD has concepts with no equivalent in AutoCAD. While not exhaustive, this appendix lists much of the jargon that may sound unusual to the AutoCAD user's ear.

ArchiCAD Term
Cutting Plane Distribute Drag a Copy Drag Element Elevate Entire Elements selection method Favorites Fillet/Chamfer Fill Find & Select Fit in Window GDL Scripting Guide Lines Hierarchal Home View Hotlink Hotspot

Equivalent AutoCAD Term


Clipping plane

D
Divide Copy Move (in the Z direction)

ARCHICAD-AUTOCAD GLOSSARY
The following lists ArchiCAD terms and the equivalent AutoCAD term.

E
Object Elevation Window

ArchiCAD Term A
Active Layer Adjust ArchiCAD Layer Arrow Tool Attributes Axonometric Bring Forward Book Settings .bpn Calculate Camera Construction Grid Cutaway

Equivalent AutoCAD Term


Current layer Lengthen Layer 0 Cursor Properties Isometric

F
Menu macros Fillet Hatch pattern QSelect Zoom Extents

G
AutoLISP Polar Tracking

B
DrawOrder Sheet Set Properties .bak

H
Nested Zoom All Bound Xref with updating ability Point

C
AttExt Camera Xline Clip

I
Image Integrity Checking Image Audit drawing

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

69

Appendix B: ArchiCAD-AutoCAD Glossary

ArchiCAD Term

Equivalent AutoCAD Term L


Layer States Sheet DesignCenter Block; but library parts are referenced, blocks are embedded Layer lock

ArchiCAD Term Project Reviewer, Mark-Up Project Publisher Rebuild Repeat Resize

Equivalent AutoCAD Term


Design Review Drawing Publish

Layer Combinations Layout Library Manager Library Part Lock Magic Wand Materials Measure Merge Module Mouse Constraints Multiply Node Object Palette Patch Partial Elements selection method .pln Plot Polygonal geometry selection method Previous View Print

R
Regen Multiple Scale

M
Boundary (Pick Points) RMat Dist Insert Xref Ortho, Snap Angle, Tracking Array

S
Send Backward Skewed Grid Split Suspend Group Symbol Line Temporary Snap Text Tool Vectorial Working Units DrawOrder Snap angle Break Selectable (Group command option) Complex linetype

T
Running osnap Mtext Command

N
Grip

O
Wblock

V
Vector

P
Tool Palette WBlock objects Crossing Window .dwg Plot Window Polygon Zoom Previous Plot

W
Units

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Appendix B: ArchiCAD-AutoCAD Glossary

Cursor Forms
ArchiCAD uses many more cursors than does AutoCAD to show which command or state it is in. For the complete list, see Appendix Cursor Forms of the ArchiCAD Reference Guide, Volume 2. Here are some cursor forms you are likely to encounter as a new ArchiCAD user.

Pencil
When you click to start drawing an element whose definition requires more than a single spot, the cursors shape changes to a pencil.

Crosshair
The Crosshair cursor is displayed when any tool other than Arrow is selected. When snap is turned on, a dot shows the snap location.

Magic Wand
The magic wand cursor is displayed by holding down the Spacebar. It creates new elements, depending on the tool selected.

Arrow with Snap


The arrow cursor is displayed when the Arrow tool is selected. When snap is turned on, a dot follows the arrow to show the snap location. Magic Wand cursor

Eyedropper
The Eyedropper cursor is displayed by holding down the Alt key. It copies settings between elements. The origin of the drawing is shown by the x.

Mercedes
The Mercedes cursor snaps to the reference line of walls and beams. A lighter variant of the mercedes cursor snaps to the other edges of walls and beams.

Eyedropper cursor

Scissors
The Scissors cursor is displayed by holding down the Ctrl key. It trims elements with other crossed elements. Scissors cursor

Checkmark
The Checkmark cursor snaps to the nodes on the reference line of walls and beams. A lighter variant of the checkmark cursor snaps to the other nodes of walls and beams.

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

71

Appendix B: ArchiCAD-AutoCAD Glossary

Some File Extensions .plc .pln .plp .pmk Draft: a draft copy of a teamwork project file Plan: a complete ArchiCAD drawing file Teamwork Project File PlotMaker: formally for plotting plans in version 9 and earlier, reintroduced in version 12. .mod Module: a simplified ArchiCAD drawing .gdl Geometric Description Language: for programming parametric shapes (Legacy). .gsm GDL objects

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

Appendix C: Teamwork Roles & Permissions

APPENDIX C: TEAMWORK ROLES & PERMISSIONS


There are several different roles defined for Teamwork. Each role has its own purpose with its own capabilities. Here is a matrix to help organize their permission levels.

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

73

Acknowledgements

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This book is the effort of a worldwide team of CAD writers and experts. In addition to the assistance of Simon Gilbert of Graphisoft UK, Katalin Kiss of Graphisoft, Budapest and Al Moulton of Graphisoft USA, this book would not have been possible without these contributors: Scott MacKenzie is one of the authors and graphic designers of this book. He has been a CAD manager for Architectural and Engineering firms since 1994. He is a contributing writer for Cadalyst Magazine and has been using AutoCAD since 1989 and ArchiCAD since 2005. David Byrnes is one of the AutoCAD authors of an earlier version of this book. He has been a contributing author to many AutoCAD books, is contributing editor to two industry magazines, and has trained AutoCAD users in Canada, the USA, England, and Thailand. Geoffrey Moore Langdon is the ArchiCAD author of the earlier version of this book. He is a registered architect and has taught design, solar energy, and architectural CAD at a number of colleges in the Boston area. Omar Ely is the AutoCAD technical editor of an earlier version of this book. He has worked with AutoCAD for over a decade Kimon G. Onuma is the ArchiCAD technical editor of an earlier version of this book. His ArchiCAD experience on large-scale master planning projects for the US government gives him a unique perspective of using ArchiCAD in an AutoCAD-centric world. Stephen Dunning is the copy editor. He earned his Ph.D. in English from the University of Cambridge, and has taught English composition and literature at Douglas College in Vancouver for the past twelve years. Dr. Dunning edits CAD books, and is currently employed as a regular editor for an emerging Finnish software company. Ralph Grabowski is a project manager, book designer, and one of the AutoCAD authors of an earlier version of this book. Ralph has written over 50 books about CAD, including co-author of MicroStation for AutoCAD Users.

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

INDEX
2D 3D Transferring ~ 54

C
Chamfer 27 Checkmark Cursor 71 Click to Trim 27 Command Equivalents 65 Commands Drawing ~ 11 Editing ~ 11 Special ArchiCAD ~ 61 Typing ~ 19 Viewing ~ 10, 11 Concepts Different ~ 11 New ~ 11 Similar ~ 9 Control Box 18 Coordinate Box 18 Coordinates Entering ~ 22 Relative ~ 22 Coordinates palette 30, 50 Copy 26 Cover Fill 34 Creating ~ Curtain Walls 43 ~ Custom Doors 53 ~ Custom Objects 53 ~ Custom Windows 50 ~ Floorplan 30 ~ Plot Layout 49 Modules and Symbols 23 Crosshair Cursor 71 Cursor Forms 71 Curtain Walls 41, 43 Custom Linetypes 60 Objects 50 Windows 50 custom objects 50 Customization 60

D
Dimension tool 37 Dimensions 9, 37 Door Settings dialog box 33, 34 Door tool 33 Doors 53 drafting speed 63 Drag 26 Drag a Copy 26 Drawing Tools 18

Exporting in ~ 57 Transferring ~ 54 3D Filter 47 3D Navigation 18

A
Additional Stories 45 Add-Ons 61 Advantages ~ over Xref and Paperspace 48 ~ to ArchiCAD 8 ArchiCAD ~ -AutoCAD Glossary 69 Advantages to ~ 8 Command Equivalents 65 Customization 60 Editing with ~ 9 Exporting from ~ 55 Methods 15, 17 Special ~ Commands 61 Starting ~ 17 Support 58, 59 User Interface 11, 17 ArchiForma 24 Architectural Desktop 59 Support 60 Array (Multiply) 11 Arrow with Snap 71 Attributes 57 AutoCAD ArchiCAD- ~ Glossary 69 Support 59 AutoLISP 60

E
Editing ~ with ArchiCAD 26 Noun-Verb ~ 21 Element Information Palette 61 Elements 18 Elevation tool 40 Elevation Views 39 Elevators and Escalators 45 Empty Opening 34 Exporting ~ by Publishing 56 ~ from ArchiCAD to AutoCAD 55 ~ in 2D 56 ~ in 3D 55 Exporting in 2D 56 Extensions 72 External Content 54 Eyedropper Cursor 71

F
Favorites 61 File 54 File Extensions 72 File Special 54 Fill tool 30, 50 Fillet 27 Find & Select tool 61 Floor Plan and Section 34 Floor Slab 12, 34, 44 Floorplan 30 Furnishing 36

B
Batch Output 62 Blocks 9 BYLAYER 57

ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users

75

Index

G
GDL Object Enabler 59 Objects 12, 24 Geometry Methods 30, 31 Grid/Snap button 30 Group 23

O
Object Library 36 Object Settings 45 Object Settings dialog 36 Object Settings dialog box 36 Object Snaps 23 Objects 21, 64 Changing ~ 20 GDL ~ 24 Offset 51

Stories 12, 25 Story Settings dialog box 38 Structural Grid 41 structural grid 41 Support 59 Symbol Libraries 9 Symbols 9, 23

H
Hip Roof 39 Hotlinked Modules 25

P
Palettes 18 Paperspace 48 Parameters 36, 43 Parametric GDL Objects 12 Pens and Colors 57 Plot Layout 10, 49 Polylines 27 Productivity Techniques 60 Project Publisher 62 project templates 63 Publisher Sets 62 Publishing 57

I
IFC Classes 59 Importing 54 Info Box 18

K
Keyboard Shortcuts 60

TeamWork 8, 25 Template Drawings 9 Template File 57 Text Translation 55 Tool Settings 64 Toolbox 18 Transitioning From AutoCAD to ArchiCAD 14 Translator File 56 Translators 54 Trim 27

U
Ungroup 32

L
Layer Combinations 24 Layer name conversion 57 Layer Standards 55 Layers 20, 24 Line Types 60 Line types 57 line types 57

W
Wall Default Settings 21 Wall Settings dialog box 31 Wall tool 30, 31 Window 50 Window Controls 19 Window Settings dialog box 32 Window tool 32 Windows 32 Inserting ~ 32

Q
QuickViews 19

R
Resize 26 Roof tool 39

M
Magic Wand 34 Marquee 37, 47 Mercedes Cursor 71 Merge 54 Methods 17 Modules 23 Move 26 MSA 61

S
Save as type 56 Scale 26 Section and Elevation Views 39 Section tool 39 Sections and Elevations 12 Selection Tools 60 Selections Palette 61 Shortcuts 60 slab 50 Slab tool 34, 35, 44, 51 Space Planning 8, 42 Spacebar 34 Status Report 18

X
Xref 54 xref options 58 Xrefs 48, 58

Z
Zone boundary 43 Zone tool 42 Zones 43

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ArchiCAD for AutoCAD Users