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The International Rigging & Lifting Handbook

2008 Edition

Index Introduction and Scope of Application 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 Glossary of Terms Regulations Definition and Principles of Lifting Equipment Examination of Lifting Equipment Selection of Lifting Equipment Safe Approach to Lifting Handbook Issue, Control and Receipt Document

Safe Use of Equipment 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 12.0 13.0 14.0 15.0 Cranes (Including man-riding) Chain Hoists / Pullifts Wire Rope Hoists Beam Clamps Beam Trolleys Plate Clamps Snatch Blocks / Sheave Blocks Winches 16.0 17.0 18.0 19.0 20.0 21.0 22.0 23.0 Hydraulic Jacks / Rams Wire Rope Slings Man-made Fibre Slings Alloy Grade 80 Chain Slings Shackles Eye Bolts Turnbuckles Fall Arrest Devices

Safety Advice 24.0 25.0 26.0 27.0 28.0 Slinging Guidelines Loading / Unloading of Containers (Forklift Trucks) Manual Handling and Kinetic Lifting Guidance on Personnel Transfers (Billy Pugh and Frog) Guidance for Lifting Over Live Facilities

Working Load Limit Tables Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Wire Rope Wire Rope Slings Man-made Fibre Slings Alloy Chain Slings Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8 Alloy Shackles Eye Bolts Hoist Rings Turnbuckles

Appendices Appendix 1 Lifting Gear / Legislation Matrix Appendix 2 Density of Materials Appendix 3 Recommended Hand Signals for Crane Operations Appendix 4 Recommended Hand Signals for Manriding Winches Appendix 5 Lift Categorisation Checklist Appendix 6 General Pre-lifting Checklist Quick Reference Index at Back of Handbook
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6.0

SaFE aPPROaCH TO LIFTIng The following section gives recommendations as to the correct procedures to adopt when effecting a lift. Personnel Competence

6.1

Any person using lifting equipment must be trained to operate that equipment. The person must also have a working knowledge of its capabilities and the defects likely to arise in service. This knowledge will be of value when carrying out the pre-use examinations. Never Exceed the Safe Working Load

6.2

In all lifting operations care should be taken to ensure that the load imposed on any item of equipment or on part of any item does not exceed its safe working load. When there is any uncertainty about the weight of the load or the load likely to be applied to a particular part of the equipment it is recommended that load sensing devices be used. In addition to the above, care should be taken to ensure that at all stages of lifting, the load remains in a stable condition. In general the load may be unstable if at any time (1) the centre of gravity of the load is not vertically beneath the crane hook, or (2) the centre of gravity of the load is higher than the point of attachment of the slings to the load. There are other causes of instability to be considered, eg liquid moving within a vessel, etc. Correct Use

6.3

The equipment should be used only for the specific purpose for which it is designed and should not be adapted for any other purposes without the approval of a Competent Person. Check The Lift

6.4

With ALL lifting operations the load should be lifted a nominal distance only in the first instance. This "trial lift" allows the operator to check his estimations of balance, stability, and general security of the load while it is in a relatively safe position. If any discrepancies are found the load should be lowered and the slinging revised. The sequence of trial lift and adjustment should be repeated until the operator is satisfied that the load is balanced, stable and secure.
WaRnIng! WaRnIng! WaRnIng! WaRnIng!

Do not stand below loads, keep hands clear of rigging as slack is taken up, avoid climbing on containers and stacked materials and never stand between loads and walls / bulkheads, etc.
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l NSL 1991 l www.nsl-aberdeen.com

The Organisation of Lifting Operations Flowchart NSL 2002 (Revised 2008)


All Lifting Operations must be : competently planned appropriately supervised carried out in a safe manner risk assessed

The Competent Person: The appointed person responsible for producing written plans and supervising complicated and complex lifts. Competent Personnel: Personnel suitably trained and/or experienced to perform the lifting operation safely and ef ciently at various speci c levels of dif culty as illustrated below.

Lifting Operations
Routine Lifts
2 The competent person identi es lift category and 2 The competent person identi es lift category and implements control measures as detailed below. 1 Responsible person identi es that a lifting operation is to take place.

Non-Routine Lifts

Routine Lifts Lifts


Uncomplicated lifts that are performed on a regular basis, which involve basic slinging practices, eg: the handling of pipe, tubulars, containers, the loading / unloading of trucks, etc usually performed by the deck crew, warehouse or yard personnel.

Simple Lifts
Lifts that involve the use of basic hoisting equipment, eg: a crane or manual hoist (suspended from dedicated lifting structures such as padeyes or runway beams) directly above the load. Lifts would also have to be outwith sensitive, dif cult or restricted areas. Loads would also require to have certi ed lifting points or be relatively easy to sling.

Complicated Lifts Complicated Lifts Complicated Lifts


Lifts that are dif cult due to the nature of the load,

Complex Lifts

eg: awkward shape, offset or high centre of gravity, fragile, containing liquids, no lifting attachments/dif cult to sling, etc. The loads may also require to be rotated or cross-hauled involving two or more sets of rigging and/or tandem lifting with cranes. Lifts of an extended duration i.e. covering two or more work shifts.

These lifts could be any of the rst three categories but with additional hazards,

eg: extremely heavy loads, con ned spaces, restricted headroom, lifting over unprotected plant or equipment, lifting sub-sea, lifts involving divers, lifts involving oating cranes, lifts where personnel are the load, ie lifting operations or conditions which would merit additional engineering input.

Minimum Qualifications
These lifts can be performed by personnel who have passed assessment on a Banksman/ Slinger course and/or been involved in such operations for 6 months. Their competence should be veri ed by quali ed skills assessors.

Control Measures
Planning: The use of generic plans and toolbox talks is usually adequate for this level of lifting operation. Ensure there are no changes to the original plan. Risk Assessment: If there are changes to original plan, a further risk assessment must be undertaken. Supervision: By appointed lift controller who also allocates duties to others.

Minimum Qualifications
These lifts can be performed by personnel who have passed assessment on the Technician level - Rigging and Lifting course and/or been involved in such operations for 12 months. Their competence should be veri ed by quali ed skills assessors.

Control Measures
Planning: May have a written plan or alternatively, a method documented in a Rigging and Lifting hand book. Risk Assessment: A basic risk assessment must be undertaken but need not be recorded. Supervision: By operator actually performing the work.

Minimum Qualifications
This type of lift must be performed by Riggers quali ed to National Standards eg EMTA level 2 / ECITB Level 3 (or equivalent) and/or have 5yrs experience. Their competence should be veri ed by quali ed skills assessors.

Control Measures

Minimum Qualifications

Control Measures

Planning: Written plans produced by The Competent Person combined with toolbox talks are required for this level of lifting operation.

Risk Assessment: A Risk Assessment must be undertaken and controlling measures recorded. Supervision: By The Competent Person with engineering support as required.

This type of lift must be performed by Riggers quali ed to National Standards eg EMTA level 2 / ECITB Level 3 (or equivalent) and/or have 5yrs experience.

Planning: Written plans produced by The Competent Person plus job packs combined with toolbox talks are required for this level of lifting operation.

Their competence should be veri ed by quali ed skills assessors. In addition, engineering support must be available as deemed necessary.

Risk Assessment: Risk Assessments must be undertaken and controlling measures recorded.

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Supervision: By The Competent Person with engineering support.

l NSL 1991 l www.nsl-aberdeen.com

8.51

Outrigger Bearing Pressure: Calculating the actual bearing pressure on outriggers can be quite complicated as there are so many variables. Normally, with the crane set up correctly, the bearing load would be spread across two outrigger foot plates, which would give you one set of values.

fig 8.13 As the crane booms out, the bearing pressure in these outrigger foot plates would increase due to the increased moment, generated by the extended radius. This would give you a higher set of values.
boomed out slewed right

increase pressure on this outrigger footplate

see fig 8.15 for view in this direction

fig 8.14 As the crane slews round, the bearing pressure will decrease on one foot plate and increase on the other, resulting in yet an even higher bearing pressure value. Ideally, the crane manufacturers tables for the various bearing pressures in relation to loads / radii etc. should be consulted.
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9.9

The length of the load chain should be checked to ensure that the bottom hook will reach the lowest point required without running the load chain fully out. If the load chain is permitted to run fully out, undue stress may be placed on the slack end anchorage (which is not a true load bearing component). Always i) Ensure the load rigging, ie sling / shackle / ring seats correctly in the bowl of the bottom hook and allows the safety catch to close.

9.10

fig 9.2
ii) iii) iv) 9.11 Never i) Load the tips of the hook. Ensure the load is correctly balanced. Position the hoist directly above the centre of gravity of the load (if known). Ensure all restrictions have been removed, eg hold-down bolts, etc.

fig 9.3

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27.2

Personnel Transfer Capsules (PTCs / Frogs) The PTC is a personnel transport and evacuation capsule and is supplied complete with three seats fitted with four-point safety harnesses fitted to a shock absorbing central column with lifting slings. The capsule can be fitted with a variety of optional accessories.

Plan View

Elevation

fig 27.1 27.3 The PTC is designed to provide a safe and reversible method of transferring personnel to standby and supply vessels from offshore drilling rigs, although it can be used in many varying types of transfer at sea. It is designed to be safe and to be operated in heavier and rougher sea conditions than conventional transfer baskets. The PTC comprises two main assemblies, an outer protective shell consisting of a stainless framework that houses the buoyancy panels and a central column seating assembly to provide shock absorption and support. All components are designed for the marine environment. The yellow coloured PTC buoyancy panels are manufactured from medium density polyethylene. The PTC has three large open access points to permit rapid entry / exit. It can withstand lateral impacts of 2 m/s. The buoyancy distribution ensures the PTC will float upright in the event of immersion. The central column supports a keel weight which ensures that the PTC will also self right.

27.4

27.5

27.6

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l NSL 1991 l www.nsl-aberdeen.com